Backreef and beach carbonate sediments of the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia: impacts of reef geometry and currents on sediment composition

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/625655
Title:
Backreef and beach carbonate sediments of the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia: impacts of reef geometry and currents on sediment composition
Authors:
Missimer, T. M.; Almashharawi, Samir; Dehwah, Abdullah ( 0000-0002-0495-7577 ) ; Coulibaly, K.
Abstract:
Three sites in the Red Sea were investigated to assess the variability of composition in Holocene sediments of the backreef environment within 0–2 m of water depth. This is important because composition of the sediment is commonly used to estimate water depth in ancient carbonate rocks. The site located at the King Abdullah Economic City (Saudi Arabia) contains a fringing reef with the reef tract located very close to the beach at the north end, flaring to the south to produce a narrower backreef area compared to the other two sites. This geometry produces a north to south current with a velocity of up to 15 cm s−1, particularly during high onshore winds. The sediments contain predominantly non-skeletal grains, including peloids, coated grains, ooids, and grapestones that form on the bottom. The percentage of coralgal grains in the sediment was significantly lower than at the other two sites studied. Om Al Misk Island and Shoaiba have a much lower-velocity current within the backreef zone and contain predominantly coralgal sediments from the beach to the landward edge of the reef tract. The two locations containing the predominantly coralgal microfacies were statistically similar, but the King Abdullah Economic City site was statistically different despite having a similar water depth profile. Slight differences in reef configuration, including reef orientation and distance from the shore, can produce considerable differences in sediment thickness and composition within the backreef environment, which should induce caution in the interpretation of water depth in ancient carbonate rocks using composition.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
Citation:
Missimer TM, Al-Mashharawi S, Dehwah AHA, Coulibaly K (2017) Backreef and beach carbonate sediments of the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia: impacts of reef geometry and currents on sediment composition. Coral Reefs. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00338-017-1607-4.
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Coral Reefs
Issue Date:
1-Jul-2017
DOI:
10.1007/s00338-017-1607-4
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0722-4028; 1432-0975
Sponsors:
Funding for this research was provided by the Water Desalination and Reuse Center and from discretionary faculty funding by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology. The authors thank Dr. Sam Purkis and an anonymous reviewer for helping to improve the paper.
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00338-017-1607-4
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMissimer, T. M.en
dc.contributor.authorAlmashharawi, Samiren
dc.contributor.authorDehwah, Abdullahen
dc.contributor.authorCoulibaly, K.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-03T12:49:32Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-03T12:49:32Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-01en
dc.identifier.citationMissimer TM, Al-Mashharawi S, Dehwah AHA, Coulibaly K (2017) Backreef and beach carbonate sediments of the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia: impacts of reef geometry and currents on sediment composition. Coral Reefs. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00338-017-1607-4.en
dc.identifier.issn0722-4028en
dc.identifier.issn1432-0975en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00338-017-1607-4en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/625655-
dc.description.abstractThree sites in the Red Sea were investigated to assess the variability of composition in Holocene sediments of the backreef environment within 0–2 m of water depth. This is important because composition of the sediment is commonly used to estimate water depth in ancient carbonate rocks. The site located at the King Abdullah Economic City (Saudi Arabia) contains a fringing reef with the reef tract located very close to the beach at the north end, flaring to the south to produce a narrower backreef area compared to the other two sites. This geometry produces a north to south current with a velocity of up to 15 cm s−1, particularly during high onshore winds. The sediments contain predominantly non-skeletal grains, including peloids, coated grains, ooids, and grapestones that form on the bottom. The percentage of coralgal grains in the sediment was significantly lower than at the other two sites studied. Om Al Misk Island and Shoaiba have a much lower-velocity current within the backreef zone and contain predominantly coralgal sediments from the beach to the landward edge of the reef tract. The two locations containing the predominantly coralgal microfacies were statistically similar, but the King Abdullah Economic City site was statistically different despite having a similar water depth profile. Slight differences in reef configuration, including reef orientation and distance from the shore, can produce considerable differences in sediment thickness and composition within the backreef environment, which should induce caution in the interpretation of water depth in ancient carbonate rocks using composition.en
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding for this research was provided by the Water Desalination and Reuse Center and from discretionary faculty funding by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology. The authors thank Dr. Sam Purkis and an anonymous reviewer for helping to improve the paper.en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00338-017-1607-4en
dc.subjectBackreef zoneen
dc.subjectSediment compositionen
dc.subjectGrain size distributionen
dc.subjectHoloceneen
dc.subjectCoral reefen
dc.subjectRed Seaen
dc.titleBackreef and beach carbonate sediments of the Red Sea, Saudi Arabia: impacts of reef geometry and currents on sediment compositionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.identifier.journalCoral Reefsen
dc.contributor.institutionU. A. Whitaker College of Engineering, Florida Gulf Coast University, Fort Myers, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionGeoscience Support Services, La Verne, USAen
kaust.authorAlmashharawi, Samiren
kaust.authorDehwah, Abdullahen
All Items in KAUST are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.