Small-bubble transport and splitting dynamics in a symmetric bifurcation

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/625646
Title:
Small-bubble transport and splitting dynamics in a symmetric bifurcation
Authors:
Qamar, Adnan; Warnez, Matthew; Valassis, Doug T.; Guetzko, Megan E.; Bull, Joseph L.
Abstract:
Simulations of small bubbles traveling through symmetric bifurcations are conducted to garner information pertinent to gas embolotherapy, a potential cancer treatment. Gas embolotherapy procedures use intra-arterial bubbles to occlude tumor blood supply. As bubbles pass through bifurcations in the blood stream nonhomogeneous splitting and undesirable bioeffects may occur. To aid development of gas embolotherapy techniques, a volume of fluid method is used to model the splitting process of gas bubbles passing through artery and arteriole bifurcations. The model reproduces the variety of splitting behaviors observed experimentally, including the bubble reversal phenomenon. Splitting homogeneity and maximum shear stress along the vessel walls is predicted over a variety of physical parameters. Small bubbles, having initial length less than twice the vessel diameter, were found unlikely to split in the presence of gravitational asymmetry. Maximum shear stresses were found to decrease exponentially with increasing Reynolds number. Vortex-induced shearing near the bifurcation is identified as a possible mechanism for endothelial cell damage.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
Citation:
Qamar A, Warnez M, Valassis DT, Guetzko ME, Bull JL (2017) Small-bubble transport and splitting dynamics in a symmetric bifurcation. Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering 20: 1182–1194. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10255842.2017.1340466.
Publisher:
Informa UK Limited
Journal:
Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering
Issue Date:
28-Jun-2017
DOI:
10.1080/10255842.2017.1340466
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1025-5842; 1476-8259
Sponsors:
This research has been funded by NIH [grant number RO1EB006467].
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10255842.2017.1340466
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorQamar, Adnanen
dc.contributor.authorWarnez, Matthewen
dc.contributor.authorValassis, Doug T.en
dc.contributor.authorGuetzko, Megan E.en
dc.contributor.authorBull, Joseph L.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-03T12:49:31Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-03T12:49:31Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-28en
dc.identifier.citationQamar A, Warnez M, Valassis DT, Guetzko ME, Bull JL (2017) Small-bubble transport and splitting dynamics in a symmetric bifurcation. Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering 20: 1182–1194. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10255842.2017.1340466.en
dc.identifier.issn1025-5842en
dc.identifier.issn1476-8259en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10255842.2017.1340466en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/625646-
dc.description.abstractSimulations of small bubbles traveling through symmetric bifurcations are conducted to garner information pertinent to gas embolotherapy, a potential cancer treatment. Gas embolotherapy procedures use intra-arterial bubbles to occlude tumor blood supply. As bubbles pass through bifurcations in the blood stream nonhomogeneous splitting and undesirable bioeffects may occur. To aid development of gas embolotherapy techniques, a volume of fluid method is used to model the splitting process of gas bubbles passing through artery and arteriole bifurcations. The model reproduces the variety of splitting behaviors observed experimentally, including the bubble reversal phenomenon. Splitting homogeneity and maximum shear stress along the vessel walls is predicted over a variety of physical parameters. Small bubbles, having initial length less than twice the vessel diameter, were found unlikely to split in the presence of gravitational asymmetry. Maximum shear stresses were found to decrease exponentially with increasing Reynolds number. Vortex-induced shearing near the bifurcation is identified as a possible mechanism for endothelial cell damage.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research has been funded by NIH [grant number RO1EB006467].en
dc.publisherInforma UK Limiteden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10255842.2017.1340466en
dc.subjectGas embolotherapyen
dc.subjectbubble splittingen
dc.subjectshear stress in bifurcationen
dc.subjectvolume of fluiden
dc.titleSmall-bubble transport and splitting dynamics in a symmetric bifurcationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.identifier.journalComputer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineeringen
dc.contributor.institutionBiomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.en
dc.contributor.institutionMechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.en
dc.contributor.institutionCase Medical Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.en
kaust.authorQamar, Adnanen
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