Global patterns in mangrove soil carbon stocks and losses

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/625640
Title:
Global patterns in mangrove soil carbon stocks and losses
Authors:
Atwood, Trisha B. ( 0000-0001-7153-5190 ) ; Connolly, Rod M.; Almahasheer, Hanan; Carnell, Paul E.; Duarte, Carlos M. ( 0000-0002-1213-1361 ) ; Ewers Lewis, Carolyn J. ( 0000-0003-0871-1715 ) ; Irigoien, Xabier; Kelleway, Jeffrey J.; Lavery, Paul S.; Macreadie, Peter I.; Serrano, Oscar; Sanders, Christian J.; Santos, Isaac ( 0000-0003-0524-842X ) ; Steven, Andrew D. L.; Lovelock, Catherine E.
Abstract:
Mangrove soils represent a large sink for otherwise rapidly recycled carbon (C). However, widespread deforestation threatens the preservation of this important C stock. It is therefore imperative that global patterns in mangrove soil C stocks and their susceptibility to remineralization are understood. Here, we present patterns in mangrove soil C stocks across hemispheres, latitudes, countries and mangrove community compositions, and estimate potential annual CO2 emissions for countries where mangroves occur. Global potential CO2 emissions from soils as a result of mangrove loss were estimated to be ~7.0 Tg CO2e yr−1. Countries with the highest potential CO2 emissions from soils are Indonesia (3,410 Gg CO2e yr−1) and Malaysia (1,288 Gg CO2e yr−1). The patterns described serve as a baseline by which countries can assess their mangrove soil C stocks and potential emissions from mangrove deforestation.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Atwood TB, Connolly RM, Almahasheer H, Carnell PE, Duarte CM, et al. (2017) Global patterns in mangrove soil carbon stocks and losses. Nature Climate Change 7: 523–528. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nclimate3326.
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Nature Climate Change
Issue Date:
26-Jun-2017
DOI:
10.1038/nclimate3326
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1758-678X; 1758-6798
Sponsors:
Support was provided by the CSIRO Coastal Carbon Biogeochemistry Cluster. We also acknowledge the support of The Oceans Institute of the University of Western Australia, the Global Change Institute of The University of Queensland, and the Australian Research Council (Awards DE130101084, DE170101524, LP160100242, LE140100083 and DP150103286) and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) through the baseline fund to C.M.D. We would like to thank P. Terletzky-Gese for assistance with GIS.
Additional Links:
https://www.nature.com/nclimate/journal/v7/n7/full/nclimate3326.html
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAtwood, Trisha B.en
dc.contributor.authorConnolly, Rod M.en
dc.contributor.authorAlmahasheer, Hananen
dc.contributor.authorCarnell, Paul E.en
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en
dc.contributor.authorEwers Lewis, Carolyn J.en
dc.contributor.authorIrigoien, Xabieren
dc.contributor.authorKelleway, Jeffrey J.en
dc.contributor.authorLavery, Paul S.en
dc.contributor.authorMacreadie, Peter I.en
dc.contributor.authorSerrano, Oscaren
dc.contributor.authorSanders, Christian J.en
dc.contributor.authorSantos, Isaacen
dc.contributor.authorSteven, Andrew D. L.en
dc.contributor.authorLovelock, Catherine E.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-03T12:49:31Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-03T12:49:31Z-
dc.date.issued2017-06-26en
dc.identifier.citationAtwood TB, Connolly RM, Almahasheer H, Carnell PE, Duarte CM, et al. (2017) Global patterns in mangrove soil carbon stocks and losses. Nature Climate Change 7: 523–528. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nclimate3326.en
dc.identifier.issn1758-678Xen
dc.identifier.issn1758-6798en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/nclimate3326en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/625640-
dc.description.abstractMangrove soils represent a large sink for otherwise rapidly recycled carbon (C). However, widespread deforestation threatens the preservation of this important C stock. It is therefore imperative that global patterns in mangrove soil C stocks and their susceptibility to remineralization are understood. Here, we present patterns in mangrove soil C stocks across hemispheres, latitudes, countries and mangrove community compositions, and estimate potential annual CO2 emissions for countries where mangroves occur. Global potential CO2 emissions from soils as a result of mangrove loss were estimated to be ~7.0 Tg CO2e yr−1. Countries with the highest potential CO2 emissions from soils are Indonesia (3,410 Gg CO2e yr−1) and Malaysia (1,288 Gg CO2e yr−1). The patterns described serve as a baseline by which countries can assess their mangrove soil C stocks and potential emissions from mangrove deforestation.en
dc.description.sponsorshipSupport was provided by the CSIRO Coastal Carbon Biogeochemistry Cluster. We also acknowledge the support of The Oceans Institute of the University of Western Australia, the Global Change Institute of The University of Queensland, and the Australian Research Council (Awards DE130101084, DE170101524, LP160100242, LE140100083 and DP150103286) and King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) through the baseline fund to C.M.D. We would like to thank P. Terletzky-Gese for assistance with GIS.en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.nature.com/nclimate/journal/v7/n7/full/nclimate3326.htmlen
dc.titleGlobal patterns in mangrove soil carbon stocks and lossesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalNature Climate Changeen
dc.contributor.institutionGlobal Change Institute, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4067, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Watershed Sciences and Ecology Center, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84322-5210, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionAustralian Rivers Institute—Coast and Estuaries, School of Environment, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland 4222, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionBiology Department, University of Dammam (UOD), Dammam 31441-1982, Saudi Arabiaen
dc.contributor.institutionDeakin University, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Center for Integrative Ecology, Burwood, Victoria 3125, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionIkerbasque, Basque Foundation for Science, 48013 Bilbao, Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionAZTI—Marine Research, Herrera Kaia, Portualdea z/g-20110 Pasaia (Gipuzkoa), Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Environmental Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales 2109, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionCentre d’Estudis Avançats de Blanes—CSIC, 17300 Blanes, Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Science & Centre for Marine Ecosystems Research, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, Western Australia 6027, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionUWA Oceans Institute, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia 6009, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionNational Marine Science Centre, School of Environment, Science and Engineering, Southern Cross University, Coffs Harbour, New South Wales 2450, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionCSIRO Oceans and Atmosphere, Ecosciences Precinct, Dutton Park, Queensland 4102, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Biological Sciences, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australiaen
kaust.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en
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