Multiple stressor effects on marine infauna: responses of estuarine taxa and functional traits to sedimentation, nutrient and metal loading

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/625518
Title:
Multiple stressor effects on marine infauna: responses of estuarine taxa and functional traits to sedimentation, nutrient and metal loading
Authors:
Ellis, Joanne ( 0000-0002-2625-4274 ) ; Clark, D.; Atalah, J.; Jiang, W.; Taiapa, C.; Patterson, M.; Sinner, J.; Hewitt, J.
Abstract:
Sedimentation, nutrients and metal loading to coastal environments are increasing, associated with urbanization and global warming, hence there is a growing need to predict ecological responses to such change. Using a regression technique we predicted how maximum abundance of 20 macrobenthic taxa and 22 functional traits separately and interactively responded to these key stressors. The abundance of most taxa declined in response to sedimentation and metal loading while a unimodal response was often associated with nutrient loading. Optimum abundances for both taxa and traits occurred at relatively low stressor levels, highlighting the vulnerability of estuaries to increasing stressor loads. Individual taxa were more susceptible to stress than traits, suggesting that functional traits may be less sensitive for detecting changes in ecosystem health. Multiplicative effects were more common than additive interactions. The observed sensitivity of most taxa to increasing sedimentation and metal loading and the documented interaction effects between multiple stressors have important implications for understanding and managing the ecological consequences of eutrophication, sedimentation and contaminants on coastal ecosystems.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Ellis JI, Clark D, Atalah J, Jiang W, Taiapa C, et al. (2017) Multiple stressor effects on marine infauna: responses of estuarine taxa and functional traits to sedimentation, nutrient and metal loading. Scientific Reports 7. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-12323-5.
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Scientific Reports
Issue Date:
14-Sep-2017
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-12323-5
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2045-2322
Sponsors:
We thank the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) for funding this work (contract MAUX0907) and the Bay of Plenty Regional Council for providing co-funding for the data analysis. We greatly appreciate the help we received from various parties while undertaking the ecological survey; the University of Waikato, the Bay of Plenty Regional Council, Manaaki Te Awanui, volunteers. Useful review comments were provided by two anonymous referees.
Additional Links:
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-12323-5
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEllis, Joanneen
dc.contributor.authorClark, D.en
dc.contributor.authorAtalah, J.en
dc.contributor.authorJiang, W.en
dc.contributor.authorTaiapa, C.en
dc.contributor.authorPatterson, M.en
dc.contributor.authorSinner, J.en
dc.contributor.authorHewitt, J.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-01T05:07:26Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-01T05:07:26Z-
dc.date.issued2017-09-14en
dc.identifier.citationEllis JI, Clark D, Atalah J, Jiang W, Taiapa C, et al. (2017) Multiple stressor effects on marine infauna: responses of estuarine taxa and functional traits to sedimentation, nutrient and metal loading. Scientific Reports 7. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-12323-5.en
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-017-12323-5en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/625518-
dc.description.abstractSedimentation, nutrients and metal loading to coastal environments are increasing, associated with urbanization and global warming, hence there is a growing need to predict ecological responses to such change. Using a regression technique we predicted how maximum abundance of 20 macrobenthic taxa and 22 functional traits separately and interactively responded to these key stressors. The abundance of most taxa declined in response to sedimentation and metal loading while a unimodal response was often associated with nutrient loading. Optimum abundances for both taxa and traits occurred at relatively low stressor levels, highlighting the vulnerability of estuaries to increasing stressor loads. Individual taxa were more susceptible to stress than traits, suggesting that functional traits may be less sensitive for detecting changes in ecosystem health. Multiplicative effects were more common than additive interactions. The observed sensitivity of most taxa to increasing sedimentation and metal loading and the documented interaction effects between multiple stressors have important implications for understanding and managing the ecological consequences of eutrophication, sedimentation and contaminants on coastal ecosystems.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) for funding this work (contract MAUX0907) and the Bay of Plenty Regional Council for providing co-funding for the data analysis. We greatly appreciate the help we received from various parties while undertaking the ecological survey; the University of Waikato, the Bay of Plenty Regional Council, Manaaki Te Awanui, volunteers. Useful review comments were provided by two anonymous referees.en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-12323-5en
dc.rightsThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleMultiple stressor effects on marine infauna: responses of estuarine taxa and functional traits to sedimentation, nutrient and metal loadingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionCawthron Institute, Private Bag 2, Nelson, 7042, New Zealand.en
dc.contributor.institutionManaaki Te Awanui, 234a Waihi Rd, Tauranga, 3110, New Zealand.en
dc.contributor.institutionMassey University, School of People Environment and Planning, Private Bag 11222, Palmerston North, 4442, New Zealand.en
dc.contributor.institutionNational Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, PO Box 11115, Hillcrest, Hamilton, 3216, New Zealand.en
kaust.authorEllis, Joanneen
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