Asynchrony of wind and hydropower resources in Australia

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/625400
Title:
Asynchrony of wind and hydropower resources in Australia
Authors:
Gunturu, Udaya; Hallgren, Willow
Abstract:
Wind and hydropower together constitute nearly 80% of the renewable capacity in Australia and their resources are collocated. We show that wind and hydro generation capacity factors covary negatively at the interannual time scales. Thus, the technology diversity mitigates the variability of renewable power generation at the interannual scales. The asynchrony of wind and hydropower resources is explained by the differential impact of the two modes of the El Ni˜no Southern Oscillation – canonical and Modoki – on the wind and hydro resources. Also, the Modoki El Ni˜no and the Modoki La Ni˜na phases have greater impact. The seasonal impact patterns corroborate these results. As the proportion of wind power increases in Australia’s energy mix, this negative covariation has implications for storage capacity of excess wind generation at short time scales and for generation system adequacy at the longer time scales.
KAUST Department:
Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
Citation:
Gunturu UB, Hallgren W (2017) Asynchrony of wind and hydropower resources in Australia. Scientific Reports 7. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-08981-0.
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Scientific Reports
Issue Date:
14-Aug-2017
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-08981-0
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2045-2322
Sponsors:
The authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change by government, industry and foundation funding, the MIT Energy Initiative, and industrial sponsors. The research reported in this publication was supported by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). The MERRA data used in this study have been provided by the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) at NASA Goddard Flight Center. We are also grateful to the Griffth University, Australia, for supporting Willow Hallgren during the preparation of the manuscript.
Additional Links:
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-08981-0
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGunturu, Udayaen
dc.contributor.authorHallgren, Willowen
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-28T10:27:59Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-28T10:27:59Z-
dc.date.issued2017-08-14en
dc.identifier.citationGunturu UB, Hallgren W (2017) Asynchrony of wind and hydropower resources in Australia. Scientific Reports 7. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-08981-0.en
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-017-08981-0en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/625400-
dc.description.abstractWind and hydropower together constitute nearly 80% of the renewable capacity in Australia and their resources are collocated. We show that wind and hydro generation capacity factors covary negatively at the interannual time scales. Thus, the technology diversity mitigates the variability of renewable power generation at the interannual scales. The asynchrony of wind and hydropower resources is explained by the differential impact of the two modes of the El Ni˜no Southern Oscillation – canonical and Modoki – on the wind and hydro resources. Also, the Modoki El Ni˜no and the Modoki La Ni˜na phases have greater impact. The seasonal impact patterns corroborate these results. As the proportion of wind power increases in Australia’s energy mix, this negative covariation has implications for storage capacity of excess wind generation at short time scales and for generation system adequacy at the longer time scales.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors gratefully acknowledge the support of the MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change by government, industry and foundation funding, the MIT Energy Initiative, and industrial sponsors. The research reported in this publication was supported by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). The MERRA data used in this study have been provided by the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) at NASA Goddard Flight Center. We are also grateful to the Griffth University, Australia, for supporting Willow Hallgren during the preparation of the manuscript.en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-08981-0en
dc.rightsThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleAsynchrony of wind and hydropower resources in Australiaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionThe MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, 02139, MA, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionGriffith Climate Change Response Program, Griffith University, Gold Coast Campus, Gold Coast, QLD, 4222, Australiaen
kaust.authorGunturu, Udayaen
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