Gradual adaptation to salt and dissolved oxygen: Strategies to minimize adverse effect of salinity on aerobic granular sludge

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/625338
Title:
Gradual adaptation to salt and dissolved oxygen: Strategies to minimize adverse effect of salinity on aerobic granular sludge
Authors:
Wang, Zhongwei; van Loosdrecht, Mark C.M. ( 0000-0003-0658-4775 ) ; Saikaly, Pascal ( 0000-0001-7678-3986 )
Abstract:
Salinity can affect the performance of biological wastewater treatment in terms of nutrient removal. The effect of salt on aerobic granular sludge (AGS) process in terms of granulation and nutrient removal was examined in this study. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of salt (15 g/L NaCl) on granule formation and nutrient removal in AGS system started with flocculent sludge and operated at DO of 2.5 mg/L (phase I). In addition, experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of gradually increasing the salt concentration (2.5 g/L to 15 g/L NaCl) or increasing the DO level (2.5 mg/L to 8 mg/L) on nutrient removal in AGS system started with granular sludge (phase II) taken from an AGS reactor performing well in terms of N and P removal. Although the addition of salt in phase I did not affect the granulation process, it significantly affected nutrient removal due to inhibition of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and phosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Increasing the DO to 8 mg/L or adapting granules by gradually increasing the salt concentration minimized the adverse effect of salt on nitrification (phase II). However, these strategies were not successful for mitigating the effect of salt on biological phosphorus removal. No nitrite accumulation occurred in all the reactors suggesting that inhibition of biological phosphorus removal was not due to the accumulation of nitrite as previously reported. Also, glycogen accumulating organisms were shown to be more tolerant to salt than PAO II, which was the dominant PAO clade detected in this study. Future studies comparing the salinity tolerance of different PAO clades are needed to further elucidate the effect of salt on PAOs.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
Citation:
Wang Z, van Loosdrecht MCM, Saikaly PE (2017) Gradual adaptation to salt and dissolved oxygen: Strategies to minimize adverse effect of salinity on aerobic granular sludge. Water Research. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2017.08.026.
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Water Research
Issue Date:
13-Aug-2017
DOI:
10.1016/j.watres.2017.08.026
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0043-1354
Sponsors:
This work was supported by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). The authors would like to thank Dr. Mario Pronk at Delft University of Technology for the design of the reactors, Guodong Li at KAUST for the automatization of the SBR systems, and Dr. Samik Bagchi at KAUST for qPCR protocol optimization.
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0043135417306887
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWang, Zhongweien
dc.contributor.authorvan Loosdrecht, Mark C.M.en
dc.contributor.authorSaikaly, Pascalen
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-14T06:41:38Z-
dc.date.available2017-08-14T06:41:38Z-
dc.date.issued2017-08-13en
dc.identifier.citationWang Z, van Loosdrecht MCM, Saikaly PE (2017) Gradual adaptation to salt and dissolved oxygen: Strategies to minimize adverse effect of salinity on aerobic granular sludge. Water Research. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2017.08.026.en
dc.identifier.issn0043-1354en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.watres.2017.08.026en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/625338-
dc.description.abstractSalinity can affect the performance of biological wastewater treatment in terms of nutrient removal. The effect of salt on aerobic granular sludge (AGS) process in terms of granulation and nutrient removal was examined in this study. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of salt (15 g/L NaCl) on granule formation and nutrient removal in AGS system started with flocculent sludge and operated at DO of 2.5 mg/L (phase I). In addition, experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of gradually increasing the salt concentration (2.5 g/L to 15 g/L NaCl) or increasing the DO level (2.5 mg/L to 8 mg/L) on nutrient removal in AGS system started with granular sludge (phase II) taken from an AGS reactor performing well in terms of N and P removal. Although the addition of salt in phase I did not affect the granulation process, it significantly affected nutrient removal due to inhibition of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and phosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). Increasing the DO to 8 mg/L or adapting granules by gradually increasing the salt concentration minimized the adverse effect of salt on nitrification (phase II). However, these strategies were not successful for mitigating the effect of salt on biological phosphorus removal. No nitrite accumulation occurred in all the reactors suggesting that inhibition of biological phosphorus removal was not due to the accumulation of nitrite as previously reported. Also, glycogen accumulating organisms were shown to be more tolerant to salt than PAO II, which was the dominant PAO clade detected in this study. Future studies comparing the salinity tolerance of different PAO clades are needed to further elucidate the effect of salt on PAOs.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). The authors would like to thank Dr. Mario Pronk at Delft University of Technology for the design of the reactors, Guodong Li at KAUST for the automatization of the SBR systems, and Dr. Samik Bagchi at KAUST for qPCR protocol optimization.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0043135417306887en
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Water Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Water Research, [, , (2017-08-13)] DOI: 10.1016/j.watres.2017.08.026 . © 2017. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectAerobic granular sludgeen
dc.subjectDissolved oxygenen
dc.subjectNitrificationen
dc.subjectNutrient removalen
dc.subjectSalt effecten
dc.subjectPhosphate accumulating organismsen
dc.titleGradual adaptation to salt and dissolved oxygen: Strategies to minimize adverse effect of salinity on aerobic granular sludgeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.identifier.journalWater Researchen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionEnvironmental Biotechnology, Department of Biotechnology, Delft University of Technology, Van der Maasweg 9, 2629 HZ, Delft, The Netherlandsen
kaust.authorWang, Zhongweien
kaust.authorSaikaly, Pascalen
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