Effect of engineered environment on microbial community structure in biofilter and biofilm on reverse osmosis membrane

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/625270
Title:
Effect of engineered environment on microbial community structure in biofilter and biofilm on reverse osmosis membrane
Authors:
Jeong, Sanghyun; Cho, Kyungjin; Jeong, Dawoon; Lee, Seockheon; Leiknes, TorOve ( 0000-0003-4046-5622 ) ; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu; Bae, Hyokwan ( 0000-0002-2422-9411 )
Abstract:
Four dual media filters (DMFs) were operated in a biofiltration mode with different engineered environments (DMF I and II: coagulation with/without acidification and DMF III and IV: without/with chlorination). Designed biofilm enrichment reactors (BERs) containing the removable reverse osmosis (RO) coupons, were connected at the end of the DMFs in parallel to analyze the biofilm on the RO membrane by DMF effluents. Filtration performances were evaluated in terms of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and assimilable organic carbon (AOC). Organic foulants on the RO membrane were also quantified and fractionized. The bacterial community structures in liquid (seawater and effluent) and biofilm (DMF and RO) samples were analyzed using 454-pyrosequencing. The DMF IV fed with the chlorinated seawater demonstrated the highest reductions of DOC including LMW-N as well as AOC among the other DMFs. The DMF IV was also effective in reducing organic foulants on the RO membrane surface. The bacterial community structure was grouped according to the sample phase (i.e., liquid and biofilm samples), sampling location (i.e., DMF and RO samples), and chlorination (chlorinated and non-chlorinated samples). In particular, the biofilm community in the DMF IV differed from the other DMF treatments, suggesting that chlorination exerted as stronger selective pressure than pH adjustment or coagulation on the biofilm community. In the DMF IV, several chemoorganotrophic chlorine-resistant biofilm-forming bacteria such as Hyphomonas, Erythrobacter, and Sphingomonas were predominant, and they may enhance organic carbon degradation efficiency. Diverse halophilic or halotolerant organic degraders were also found in other DMFs (i.e., DMF I, II, and III). Various kinds of dominant biofilm-forming bacteria were also investigated in RO membrane samples; the results provided possible candidates that cause biofouling when DMF process is applied as the pretreatment option for the RO process.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
Citation:
Jeong S, Cho K, Jeong D, Lee S, Leiknes T, et al. (2017) Effect of engineered environment on microbial community structure in biofilter and biofilm on reverse osmosis membrane. Water Research. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2017.07.064.
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Water Research
Issue Date:
25-Jul-2017
DOI:
10.1016/j.watres.2017.07.064
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0043-1354
Sponsors:
This research was supported by grants (codes 17IFIP-B088091-04 and 17IFIP-B065893-05) from Industrial Facilities & Infrastructure Research Program funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of Korean government.
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0043135417306371
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJeong, Sanghyunen
dc.contributor.authorCho, Kyungjinen
dc.contributor.authorJeong, Dawoonen
dc.contributor.authorLee, Seockheonen
dc.contributor.authorLeiknes, TorOveen
dc.contributor.authorVigneswaran, Saravanamuthuen
dc.contributor.authorBae, Hyokwanen
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-27T11:21:47Z-
dc.date.available2017-07-27T11:21:47Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-25en
dc.identifier.citationJeong S, Cho K, Jeong D, Lee S, Leiknes T, et al. (2017) Effect of engineered environment on microbial community structure in biofilter and biofilm on reverse osmosis membrane. Water Research. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2017.07.064.en
dc.identifier.issn0043-1354en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.watres.2017.07.064en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/625270-
dc.description.abstractFour dual media filters (DMFs) were operated in a biofiltration mode with different engineered environments (DMF I and II: coagulation with/without acidification and DMF III and IV: without/with chlorination). Designed biofilm enrichment reactors (BERs) containing the removable reverse osmosis (RO) coupons, were connected at the end of the DMFs in parallel to analyze the biofilm on the RO membrane by DMF effluents. Filtration performances were evaluated in terms of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and assimilable organic carbon (AOC). Organic foulants on the RO membrane were also quantified and fractionized. The bacterial community structures in liquid (seawater and effluent) and biofilm (DMF and RO) samples were analyzed using 454-pyrosequencing. The DMF IV fed with the chlorinated seawater demonstrated the highest reductions of DOC including LMW-N as well as AOC among the other DMFs. The DMF IV was also effective in reducing organic foulants on the RO membrane surface. The bacterial community structure was grouped according to the sample phase (i.e., liquid and biofilm samples), sampling location (i.e., DMF and RO samples), and chlorination (chlorinated and non-chlorinated samples). In particular, the biofilm community in the DMF IV differed from the other DMF treatments, suggesting that chlorination exerted as stronger selective pressure than pH adjustment or coagulation on the biofilm community. In the DMF IV, several chemoorganotrophic chlorine-resistant biofilm-forming bacteria such as Hyphomonas, Erythrobacter, and Sphingomonas were predominant, and they may enhance organic carbon degradation efficiency. Diverse halophilic or halotolerant organic degraders were also found in other DMFs (i.e., DMF I, II, and III). Various kinds of dominant biofilm-forming bacteria were also investigated in RO membrane samples; the results provided possible candidates that cause biofouling when DMF process is applied as the pretreatment option for the RO process.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by grants (codes 17IFIP-B088091-04 and 17IFIP-B065893-05) from Industrial Facilities & Infrastructure Research Program funded by Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport of Korean government.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0043135417306371en
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Water Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Water Research, [, , (2017-07-25)] DOI: 10.1016/j.watres.2017.07.064 . © 2017. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectBiofilmen
dc.subjectBiofiltrationen
dc.subjectChlorinationen
dc.subjectCoagulationen
dc.subjectSeawater reverse osmosisen
dc.subjectMicrobial community structureen
dc.titleEffect of engineered environment on microbial community structure in biofilter and biofilm on reverse osmosis membraneen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.identifier.journalWater Researchen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Engineering and IT, University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), PO Box 123, Broadway, NSW, 2007, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionGraduate School of Water Resources, Sungkyunkwan University (SKKU), 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon-si, Gyeonggi-do, 16419, Republic of Koreaen
dc.contributor.institutionCenter for Water Resource Cycle Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 39-1 Hawolgok-Dong, Seongbuk-Gu, Seoul, 136-791, Republic of Koreaen
dc.contributor.institutionChemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-Gu, Seoul, 120-749, Republic of Koreaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Pusan National University, 63 Busandeahak-ro, Geumjeong-Gu, Busan, 46241, Republic of Koreaen
kaust.authorJeong, Sanghyunen
kaust.authorLeiknes, TorOveen
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