Predicting predatory impact of juvenile invasive lionfish (Pterois volitans) on a crustacean prey using functional response analysis: effects of temperature, habitat complexity and light regimes

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/625150
Title:
Predicting predatory impact of juvenile invasive lionfish (Pterois volitans) on a crustacean prey using functional response analysis: effects of temperature, habitat complexity and light regimes
Authors:
South, Josie; Dick, Jaimie T. A.; McCard, Monica; Barrios-O’Neill, Daniel; Anton, Andrea
Abstract:
The ecological implications of biotic interactions, such as predator-prey relationships, are often context-dependent. Comparative functional responses analysis can be used under different abiotic contexts to improve understanding and prediction of the ecological impact of invasive species. Pterois volitans (Lionfish) [Linnaeus 1758] is an established invasive species in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico, with a more recent invasion into the Mediterranean. Lionfish are generalist predators that impact a wide range of commercial and non-commercial species. Functional response analysis was employed to quantify interaction strength between lionfish and a generic prey species, the shrimp (Paleomonetes varians) [Leach 1814], under the contexts of differing temperature, habitat complexity and light wavelength. Lionfish have prey population destabilising Type II functional responses under all contexts examined. Significantly more prey were consumed at 26 °C than at 22 °C. Habitat complexity did not significantly alter the functional response parameters. Significantly more prey were consumed under white light and blue light than under red light. Attack rate was significantly higher under white light than under blue or red light. Light wavelength did not significantly change handling times. The impacts on prey populations through feeding rates may increase with concomitant temperature increase. As attack rates are very high at low habitat complexity this may elucidate the cause of high impact upon degraded reef ecosystems with low-density prey populations, although there was little protection conferred through habitat complexity. Only red light (i.e. dark) afforded any reduction in predation pressure. Management initiatives should account for these environmental factors when planning mitigation and prevention strategies.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
South J, Dick JTA, McCard M, Barrios-O’Neill D, Anton A (2017) Predicting predatory impact of juvenile invasive lionfish (Pterois volitans) on a crustacean prey using functional response analysis: effects of temperature, habitat complexity and light regimes. Environmental Biology of Fishes. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10641-017-0633-y.
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Environmental Biology of Fishes
Issue Date:
1-Jul-2017
DOI:
10.1007/s10641-017-0633-y
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0378-1909; 1573-5133
Sponsors:
We thank G. Riddell, E. Gorman and B. McNamara for their technical support and assistance with animal maintenance, and J. Sigwart for her help in stimulating discussion. We thank anonymous peer reviewers for their helpful suggestions. This research was funded by the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (Northern Ireland).
Additional Links:
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10641-017-0633-y
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSouth, Josieen
dc.contributor.authorDick, Jaimie T. A.en
dc.contributor.authorMcCard, Monicaen
dc.contributor.authorBarrios-O’Neill, Danielen
dc.contributor.authorAnton, Andreaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-03T11:45:33Z-
dc.date.available2017-07-03T11:45:33Z-
dc.date.issued2017-07-01en
dc.identifier.citationSouth J, Dick JTA, McCard M, Barrios-O’Neill D, Anton A (2017) Predicting predatory impact of juvenile invasive lionfish (Pterois volitans) on a crustacean prey using functional response analysis: effects of temperature, habitat complexity and light regimes. Environmental Biology of Fishes. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10641-017-0633-y.en
dc.identifier.issn0378-1909en
dc.identifier.issn1573-5133en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10641-017-0633-yen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/625150-
dc.description.abstractThe ecological implications of biotic interactions, such as predator-prey relationships, are often context-dependent. Comparative functional responses analysis can be used under different abiotic contexts to improve understanding and prediction of the ecological impact of invasive species. Pterois volitans (Lionfish) [Linnaeus 1758] is an established invasive species in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico, with a more recent invasion into the Mediterranean. Lionfish are generalist predators that impact a wide range of commercial and non-commercial species. Functional response analysis was employed to quantify interaction strength between lionfish and a generic prey species, the shrimp (Paleomonetes varians) [Leach 1814], under the contexts of differing temperature, habitat complexity and light wavelength. Lionfish have prey population destabilising Type II functional responses under all contexts examined. Significantly more prey were consumed at 26 °C than at 22 °C. Habitat complexity did not significantly alter the functional response parameters. Significantly more prey were consumed under white light and blue light than under red light. Attack rate was significantly higher under white light than under blue or red light. Light wavelength did not significantly change handling times. The impacts on prey populations through feeding rates may increase with concomitant temperature increase. As attack rates are very high at low habitat complexity this may elucidate the cause of high impact upon degraded reef ecosystems with low-density prey populations, although there was little protection conferred through habitat complexity. Only red light (i.e. dark) afforded any reduction in predation pressure. Management initiatives should account for these environmental factors when planning mitigation and prevention strategies.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank G. Riddell, E. Gorman and B. McNamara for their technical support and assistance with animal maintenance, and J. Sigwart for her help in stimulating discussion. We thank anonymous peer reviewers for their helpful suggestions. This research was funded by the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (Northern Ireland).en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.relation.urlhttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10641-017-0633-yen
dc.rightsThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectLionfishen
dc.subjectInvasive speciesen
dc.subjectFunctional responseen
dc.subjectFeeding ecologyen
dc.titlePredicting predatory impact of juvenile invasive lionfish (Pterois volitans) on a crustacean prey using functional response analysis: effects of temperature, habitat complexity and light regimesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalEnvironmental Biology of Fishesen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute for Global Food Security, School of Biological Sciences, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast, UKen
kaust.authorAnton, Andreaen
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