Bio-inspired ciliary force sensor for robotic platforms

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/623799
Title:
Bio-inspired ciliary force sensor for robotic platforms
Authors:
Ribeiro, Pedro; Khan, Mohammed Asadullah; Alfadhel, Ahmed ( 0000-0003-3244-0644 ) ; Kosel, Jürgen ( 0000-0002-8998-8275 ) ; Franco, Fernando; Cardoso, Susana; Bernardino, Alexandre ( 0000-0003-3991-1269 ) ; Schmitz, Alexander ( 0000-0002-8962-771X ) ; Santos-Victor, Jose ( 0000-0002-9036-1728 ) ; Jamone, Lorenzo ( 0000-0002-1521-6168 )
Abstract:
The detection of small forces is of great interest in any robotic application that involves interaction with the environment (e.g., objects manipulation, physical human-robot interaction, minimally invasive surgery), since it allows the robot to detect the contacts early on and to act accordingly. In this letter, we present a sensor design inspired by the ciliary structure frequently found in nature, consisting of an array of permanently magnetized cylinders (cilia) patterned over a giant magnetoresistance sensor (GMR). When these cylinders are deformed in shape due to applied forces, the stray magnetic field variation will change the GMR sensor resistivity, thus enabling the electrical measurement of the applied force. In this letter, we present two 3 mm × 3 mm prototypes composed of an array of five cilia with 1 mm of height and 120 and 200 μm of diameter for each prototype. A minimum force of 333 μN was measured. A simulation model for determining the magnetized cylinders average stray magnetic field is also presented.
KAUST Department:
Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Division
Citation:
Ribeiro P, Khan MA, Alfadhel A, Kosel J, Franco F, et al. (2017) Bioinspired Ciliary Force Sensor for Robotic Platforms. IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters 2: 971–976. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/lra.2017.2656249.
Publisher:
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Journal:
IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters
Issue Date:
20-Jan-2017
DOI:
10.1109/lra.2017.2656249
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2377-3766; 2377-3774
Sponsors:
This letter was recommended for publication by Associate Editor C. Natale and Editor Prof. J.Wen upon evaluation of the reviewers’ comments. This work was supported in part by EXCL/CTM-NAN/0441/2012, in part by PTDC/CTMNAN/3146/2014, and in part by UID/EEA/50009/2013 projects. The work of F. Franco was supported by FCT under Grant SFRH/BD/111538/2015 and the work of L. Jamone was supported by LIMOMAN–PIEFGA-2013-628315.
Additional Links:
http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7827912/
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Computer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRibeiro, Pedroen
dc.contributor.authorKhan, Mohammed Asadullahen
dc.contributor.authorAlfadhel, Ahmeden
dc.contributor.authorKosel, Jürgenen
dc.contributor.authorFranco, Fernandoen
dc.contributor.authorCardoso, Susanaen
dc.contributor.authorBernardino, Alexandreen
dc.contributor.authorSchmitz, Alexanderen
dc.contributor.authorSantos-Victor, Joseen
dc.contributor.authorJamone, Lorenzoen
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-31T11:23:06Z-
dc.date.available2017-05-31T11:23:06Z-
dc.date.issued2017-01-20en
dc.identifier.citationRibeiro P, Khan MA, Alfadhel A, Kosel J, Franco F, et al. (2017) Bioinspired Ciliary Force Sensor for Robotic Platforms. IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters 2: 971–976. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/lra.2017.2656249.en
dc.identifier.issn2377-3766en
dc.identifier.issn2377-3774en
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/lra.2017.2656249en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/623799-
dc.description.abstractThe detection of small forces is of great interest in any robotic application that involves interaction with the environment (e.g., objects manipulation, physical human-robot interaction, minimally invasive surgery), since it allows the robot to detect the contacts early on and to act accordingly. In this letter, we present a sensor design inspired by the ciliary structure frequently found in nature, consisting of an array of permanently magnetized cylinders (cilia) patterned over a giant magnetoresistance sensor (GMR). When these cylinders are deformed in shape due to applied forces, the stray magnetic field variation will change the GMR sensor resistivity, thus enabling the electrical measurement of the applied force. In this letter, we present two 3 mm × 3 mm prototypes composed of an array of five cilia with 1 mm of height and 120 and 200 μm of diameter for each prototype. A minimum force of 333 μN was measured. A simulation model for determining the magnetized cylinders average stray magnetic field is also presented.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis letter was recommended for publication by Associate Editor C. Natale and Editor Prof. J.Wen upon evaluation of the reviewers’ comments. This work was supported in part by EXCL/CTM-NAN/0441/2012, in part by PTDC/CTMNAN/3146/2014, and in part by UID/EEA/50009/2013 projects. The work of F. Franco was supported by FCT under Grant SFRH/BD/111538/2015 and the work of L. Jamone was supported by LIMOMAN–PIEFGA-2013-628315.en
dc.publisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)en
dc.relation.urlhttp://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7827912/en
dc.subjectsoft materials roboticsen
dc.subjectBiomimeticsen
dc.subjectforce and tactile sensingen
dc.titleBio-inspired ciliary force sensor for robotic platformsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentComputer, Electrical and Mathematical Sciences and Engineering (CEMSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalIEEE Robotics and Automation Lettersen
dc.contributor.institutionINESC-Microsistemas e Nanotecnologias and Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, 1000-029 Lisbon, Portugalen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Physics, Instituto Superior T´ecnico, 1049-001 Lisbon, Portugalen
dc.contributor.institutionInstituto de Sistemas e Rob´otica, Instituto Superior T´ecnico, 1049-001 Lisbon, Portugalen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Modern Mechanical Engineering, School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8050, Japanen
dc.contributor.institutionAdvanced Robotics at Queen Mary, School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS U.K.en
kaust.authorKhan, Mohammed Asadullahen
kaust.authorAlfadhel, Ahmeden
kaust.authorKosel, Jürgenen
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