Tuning the effective spin-orbit coupling in molecular semiconductors

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/623651
Title:
Tuning the effective spin-orbit coupling in molecular semiconductors
Authors:
Schott, Sam; McNellis, Erik R.; Nielsen, Christian B.; Chen, Hung-Yang; Watanabe, Shun; Tanaka, Hisaaki; McCulloch, Iain ( 0000-0002-6340-7217 ) ; Takimiya, Kazuo; Sinova, Jairo; Sirringhaus, Henning
Abstract:
The control of spins and spin to charge conversion in organics requires understanding the molecular spin-orbit coupling (SOC), and a means to tune its strength. However, quantifying SOC strengths indirectly through spin relaxation effects has proven difficult due to competing relaxation mechanisms. Here we present a systematic study of the g-tensor shift in molecular semiconductors and link it directly to the SOC strength in a series of high-mobility molecular semiconductors with strong potential for future devices. The results demonstrate a rich variability of the molecular g-shifts with the effective SOC, depending on subtle aspects of molecular composition and structure. We correlate the above g-shifts to spin-lattice relaxation times over four orders of magnitude, from 200 to 0.15 μs, for isolated molecules in solution and relate our findings for isolated molecules in solution to the spin relaxation mechanisms that are likely to be relevant in solid state systems.
KAUST Department:
Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
Citation:
Schott S, McNellis ER, Nielsen CB, Chen H-Y, Watanabe S, et al. (2017) Tuning the effective spin-orbit coupling in molecular semiconductors. Nature Communications 8: 15200. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms15200.
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Nature Communications
Issue Date:
11-May-2017
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms15200
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2041-1723
Sponsors:
S.S. thanks the Winton Programme for the Physics of Sustainability, the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), C. Daniel Frisbie for supplying d28-rubrene and Shin-ichi Kuroda for useful discussions. Funding from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, ERC Synergy Grant SC2 (No. 610115), and the Transregional Collaborative Research Center (SFB/TRR) 173 SPIN+X is acknowledged.
Additional Links:
https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms15200
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSchott, Samen
dc.contributor.authorMcNellis, Erik R.en
dc.contributor.authorNielsen, Christian B.en
dc.contributor.authorChen, Hung-Yangen
dc.contributor.authorWatanabe, Shunen
dc.contributor.authorTanaka, Hisaakien
dc.contributor.authorMcCulloch, Iainen
dc.contributor.authorTakimiya, Kazuoen
dc.contributor.authorSinova, Jairoen
dc.contributor.authorSirringhaus, Henningen
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-17T07:41:40Z-
dc.date.available2017-05-17T07:41:40Z-
dc.date.issued2017-05-11en
dc.identifier.citationSchott S, McNellis ER, Nielsen CB, Chen H-Y, Watanabe S, et al. (2017) Tuning the effective spin-orbit coupling in molecular semiconductors. Nature Communications 8: 15200. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms15200.en
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ncomms15200en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/623651-
dc.description.abstractThe control of spins and spin to charge conversion in organics requires understanding the molecular spin-orbit coupling (SOC), and a means to tune its strength. However, quantifying SOC strengths indirectly through spin relaxation effects has proven difficult due to competing relaxation mechanisms. Here we present a systematic study of the g-tensor shift in molecular semiconductors and link it directly to the SOC strength in a series of high-mobility molecular semiconductors with strong potential for future devices. The results demonstrate a rich variability of the molecular g-shifts with the effective SOC, depending on subtle aspects of molecular composition and structure. We correlate the above g-shifts to spin-lattice relaxation times over four orders of magnitude, from 200 to 0.15 μs, for isolated molecules in solution and relate our findings for isolated molecules in solution to the spin relaxation mechanisms that are likely to be relevant in solid state systems.en
dc.description.sponsorshipS.S. thanks the Winton Programme for the Physics of Sustainability, the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), C. Daniel Frisbie for supplying d28-rubrene and Shin-ichi Kuroda for useful discussions. Funding from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, ERC Synergy Grant SC2 (No. 610115), and the Transregional Collaborative Research Center (SFB/TRR) 173 SPIN+X is acknowledged.en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms15200en
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleTuning the effective spin-orbit coupling in molecular semiconductorsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalNature Communicationsen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionCavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE, UK.en
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Physics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, 55128 Mainz, Germany.en
dc.contributor.institutionMaterials Research Institute and School of Biological and Chemical Sciences, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS, UK.en
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemistry and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ, UK.en
dc.contributor.institutionJST, PRESTO, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012, Japan.en
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Applied Physics, Nagoya University, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603, Japan.en
dc.contributor.institutionRIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan.en
kaust.authorMcCulloch, Iainen
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