A Novel Technique for Generating and Observing Chemiluminescence in a Biological Setting

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/623625
Title:
A Novel Technique for Generating and Observing Chemiluminescence in a Biological Setting
Authors:
Büchel, Gabriel E. ( 0000-0002-5055-7099 ) ; Carney, Brandon; Tang, Jun; Zeglis, Brian M.; Eppinger, Jorg ( 0000-0001-7886-7059 ) ; Reiner, Thomas
Abstract:
Intraoperative imaging techniques have the potential to make surgical interventions safer and more effective; for these reasons, such techniques are quickly moving into the operating room. Here, we present a new approach that utilizes a technique not yet explored for intraoperative imaging: chemiluminescent imaging. This method employs a ruthenium-based chemiluminescent reporter along with a custom-built nebulizing system to produce ex vivo or in vivo images with high signal-to-noise ratios. The ruthenium-based reporter produces light following exposure to an aqueous oxidizing solution and re-reduction within the surrounding tissue. This method has allowed us to detect reporter concentrations as low as 6.9 pmol/cm(2). In this work, we present a visual guide to our proof-of-concept in vivo studies involving subdermal and intravenous injections in mice. The results suggest that this technology is a promising candidate for further preclinical research and might ultimately become a useful tool in the operating room.
KAUST Department:
KAUST Catalysis Center (KCC)
Citation:
Büchel GE, Carney B, Tang J, Zeglis BM, Eppinger J, et al. (2017) A Novel Technique for Generating and Observing Chemiluminescence in a Biological Setting. Journal of Visualized Experiments. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.3791/54694.
Publisher:
MyJove Corporation
Journal:
Journal of Visualized Experiments
Issue Date:
10-Mar-2017
DOI:
10.3791/54694
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1940-087X
Sponsors:
The authors thank Prof. Jan Grimm and Mr. Travis Shaffer for their helpful discussions and Mr. David Gregory for editing the manuscript. Technical services provided by the MSK Animal Imaging Core Facility, supported in part by NIH Cancer Center Support Grant P30CA008748-48, are gratefully acknowledged. The authors thank the NIH (K25 EB016673 and R21 CA191679, T.R. and 4R00CA178205-02, B.M.Z.), the MSK Center for Molecular Imaging and Nanotechnology (T.R.), the Tow Foundation (B.C.), and the National Science Foundation Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT 0965983 at Hunter College for B.C. and T.M.S.) for their generous support. The research reported in this publication was supported by funding from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology.
Additional Links:
https://www.jove.com/video/54694/a-novel-technique-for-generating-observing-chemiluminescence
Appears in Collections:
Articles; KAUST Catalysis Center (KCC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBüchel, Gabriel E.en
dc.contributor.authorCarney, Brandonen
dc.contributor.authorTang, Junen
dc.contributor.authorZeglis, Brian M.en
dc.contributor.authorEppinger, Jorgen
dc.contributor.authorReiner, Thomasen
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-17T07:41:38Z-
dc.date.available2017-05-17T07:41:38Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-10en
dc.identifier.citationBüchel GE, Carney B, Tang J, Zeglis BM, Eppinger J, et al. (2017) A Novel Technique for Generating and Observing Chemiluminescence in a Biological Setting. Journal of Visualized Experiments. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.3791/54694.en
dc.identifier.issn1940-087Xen
dc.identifier.doi10.3791/54694en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/623625-
dc.description.abstractIntraoperative imaging techniques have the potential to make surgical interventions safer and more effective; for these reasons, such techniques are quickly moving into the operating room. Here, we present a new approach that utilizes a technique not yet explored for intraoperative imaging: chemiluminescent imaging. This method employs a ruthenium-based chemiluminescent reporter along with a custom-built nebulizing system to produce ex vivo or in vivo images with high signal-to-noise ratios. The ruthenium-based reporter produces light following exposure to an aqueous oxidizing solution and re-reduction within the surrounding tissue. This method has allowed us to detect reporter concentrations as low as 6.9 pmol/cm(2). In this work, we present a visual guide to our proof-of-concept in vivo studies involving subdermal and intravenous injections in mice. The results suggest that this technology is a promising candidate for further preclinical research and might ultimately become a useful tool in the operating room.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors thank Prof. Jan Grimm and Mr. Travis Shaffer for their helpful discussions and Mr. David Gregory for editing the manuscript. Technical services provided by the MSK Animal Imaging Core Facility, supported in part by NIH Cancer Center Support Grant P30CA008748-48, are gratefully acknowledged. The authors thank the NIH (K25 EB016673 and R21 CA191679, T.R. and 4R00CA178205-02, B.M.Z.), the MSK Center for Molecular Imaging and Nanotechnology (T.R.), the Tow Foundation (B.C.), and the National Science Foundation Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT 0965983 at Hunter College for B.C. and T.M.S.) for their generous support. The research reported in this publication was supported by funding from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology.en
dc.publisherMyJove Corporationen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.jove.com/video/54694/a-novel-technique-for-generating-observing-chemiluminescenceen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Visualized Experimentsen
dc.subjectBioengineeringen
dc.subjectIssue 121en
dc.subjectRutheniumen
dc.subjectCeriumen
dc.subjectChemiluminescenceen
dc.subjectIntraoperative imagingen
dc.subjectLymph nodesen
dc.subjectin vivoen
dc.titleA Novel Technique for Generating and Observing Chemiluminescence in a Biological Settingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentKAUST Catalysis Center (KCC)en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Visualized Experimentsen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, , United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemistry, Hunter College, , United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionGraduate Center of City University of New York, , United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, , United Statesen
kaust.authorBüchel, Gabriel E.en
kaust.authorEppinger, Jorgen
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