Transport and structural characterization of solution-processable doped ZnO nanowires

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/623612
Title:
Transport and structural characterization of solution-processable doped ZnO nanowires
Authors:
Noriega, Rodrigo; Goris, Ludwig; Rivnay, Jonathan; Scholl, Jonathan; Thompson, Linda M.; Palke, Aaron C.; Stebbins, Jonathan F.; Salleo, Alberto
Abstract:
The use of ZnO nanowires has become a widespread topic of interest in optoelectronics. In order to correctly assess the quality, functionality, and possible applications of such nanostructures it is important to accurately understand their electrical and optical properties. Aluminum- and gallium-doped crystalline ZnO nanowires were synthesized using a low-temperature solution-based process, achieving dopant densities of the order of 1020 cm-3. A non-contact optical technique, photothermal deflection spectroscopy, is used to characterize ensembles of ZnO nanowires. By modeling the free charge carrier absorption as a Drude metal, we are able to calculate the free carrier density and mobility. Determining the location of the dopant atoms in the ZnO lattice is important to determine the doping mechanisms of the ZnO nanowires. Solid-state NMR is used to distinguish between coordination environments of the dopant atoms.
Citation:
Noriega R, Goris L, Rivnay J, Scholl J, Thompson LM, et al. (2009) Transport and structural characterization of solution-processable doped ZnO nanowires. Nanoscale Photonic and Cell Technologies for Photovoltaics II. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.826204.
Publisher:
SPIE-Intl Soc Optical Eng
Journal:
Nanoscale Photonic and Cell Technologies for Photovoltaics II
Conference/Event name:
Nanoscale Photonic and Cell Technologies for Photovoltaics II
Issue Date:
18-Aug-2009
DOI:
10.1117/12.826204
Type:
Conference Paper
Sponsors:
This research was supported by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST): Global Research Partnership (GRP) through the Center for Advanced Molecular Photovoltaics (CAMP), the Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP) through Stanford University and the Department of Energy (Solar America Initiative).
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Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNoriega, Rodrigoen
dc.contributor.authorGoris, Ludwigen
dc.contributor.authorRivnay, Jonathanen
dc.contributor.authorScholl, Jonathanen
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Linda M.en
dc.contributor.authorPalke, Aaron C.en
dc.contributor.authorStebbins, Jonathan F.en
dc.contributor.authorSalleo, Albertoen
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-15T10:35:11Z-
dc.date.available2017-05-15T10:35:11Z-
dc.date.issued2009-08-18en
dc.identifier.citationNoriega R, Goris L, Rivnay J, Scholl J, Thompson LM, et al. (2009) Transport and structural characterization of solution-processable doped ZnO nanowires. Nanoscale Photonic and Cell Technologies for Photovoltaics II. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.826204.en
dc.identifier.doi10.1117/12.826204en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/623612-
dc.description.abstractThe use of ZnO nanowires has become a widespread topic of interest in optoelectronics. In order to correctly assess the quality, functionality, and possible applications of such nanostructures it is important to accurately understand their electrical and optical properties. Aluminum- and gallium-doped crystalline ZnO nanowires were synthesized using a low-temperature solution-based process, achieving dopant densities of the order of 1020 cm-3. A non-contact optical technique, photothermal deflection spectroscopy, is used to characterize ensembles of ZnO nanowires. By modeling the free charge carrier absorption as a Drude metal, we are able to calculate the free carrier density and mobility. Determining the location of the dopant atoms in the ZnO lattice is important to determine the doping mechanisms of the ZnO nanowires. Solid-state NMR is used to distinguish between coordination environments of the dopant atoms.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST): Global Research Partnership (GRP) through the Center for Advanced Molecular Photovoltaics (CAMP), the Global Climate and Energy Project (GCEP) through Stanford University and the Department of Energy (Solar America Initiative).en
dc.publisherSPIE-Intl Soc Optical Engen
dc.subjectZinc oxide nanostructuresen
dc.subjecttransparent conducting oxidesen
dc.subjectdoping mechanismen
dc.titleTransport and structural characterization of solution-processable doped ZnO nanowiresen
dc.typeConference Paperen
dc.identifier.journalNanoscale Photonic and Cell Technologies for Photovoltaics IIen
dc.conference.date2009-08-02 to 2009-08-04en
dc.conference.nameNanoscale Photonic and Cell Technologies for Photovoltaics IIen
dc.conference.locationSan Diego, CA, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Applied Physics, Stanford University, 316 Via Pueblo Mall, 94305 Stanford, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, 476 Lomita Mall, 94305 Stanford, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford CA 94305, USAen
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