Continuous daylight in the high-Arctic summer supports high plankton respiration rates compared to those supported in the dark

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/623322
Title:
Continuous daylight in the high-Arctic summer supports high plankton respiration rates compared to those supported in the dark
Authors:
Mesa, Elena; Delgado-Huertas, Antonio ( 0000-0002-7240-1570 ) ; Carrillo-de-Albornoz, Paloma; García-Corral, Lara S.; Sanz-Martín, Marina; Wassmann, Paul; Reigstad, Marit; Sejr, Mikael; Dalsgaard, Tage ( 0000-0003-2604-6499 ) ; Duarte, Carlos M.
Abstract:
Plankton respiration rate is a major component of global CO2 production and is forecasted to increase rapidly in the Arctic with warming. Yet, existing assessments in the Arctic evaluated plankton respiration in the dark. Evidence that plankton respiration may be stimulated in the light is particularly relevant for the high Arctic where plankton communities experience continuous daylight in spring and summer. Here we demonstrate that plankton community respiration evaluated under the continuous daylight conditions present in situ, tends to be higher than that evaluated in the dark. The ratio between community respiration measured in the light (Rlight) and in the dark (Rdark) increased as the 2/3 power of Rlight so that the Rlight:Rdark ratio increased from an average value of 1.37 at the median Rlight measured here (3.62 µmol O2 L-1 d-1) to an average value of 17.56 at the highest Rlight measured here (15.8 µmol O2 L-1 d-1). The role of respiratory processes as a source of CO2 in the Arctic has, therefore, been underestimated and is far more important than previously believed, particularly in the late spring, with 24 h photoperiods, when community respiration rates are highest.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Mesa E, Delgado-Huertas A, Carrillo-de-Albornoz P, García-Corral LS, Sanz-Martín M, et al. (2017) Continuous daylight in the high-Arctic summer supports high plankton respiration rates compared to those supported in the dark. Scientific Reports 7. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-01203-7.
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Scientific Reports
Issue Date:
21-Apr-2017
DOI:
10.1038/s41598-017-01203-7
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2045-2322
Sponsors:
This study is a contribution to projects ARCTICMET and ATOS, funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (CTM2011-15792-E and POL2006-00550/CTM, respectively), the ATP project funded by the FP-7 of the EU (CTM2009-07781-E), and the CarbonBridge project (no. 226415) funded by the Norwegian Research Council. Work in Young Sound was funded by the Greenland Ecosystem Monitoring (GEM) program. We thank the crew of R/V Helmer Hanssen and Young Sound participants for support, and Arsenio Granados for the measurement of δ18O-H2O of spiked samples. We gratefully acknowledge the contributions from the Arctic Research Centre, Aarhus University. This work is a contribution to the Arctic Science Partnership (ASP) asp-net.org. M.S.-M. was supported by a La Caixa PhD fellowship. E.M. was supported by a JAE Pre-doc fellowship from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and the BBVA Foundation, and a visiting student fellowship from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).
Additional Links:
http://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-01203-7
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMesa, Elenaen
dc.contributor.authorDelgado-Huertas, Antonioen
dc.contributor.authorCarrillo-de-Albornoz, Palomaen
dc.contributor.authorGarcía-Corral, Lara S.en
dc.contributor.authorSanz-Martín, Marinaen
dc.contributor.authorWassmann, Paulen
dc.contributor.authorReigstad, Mariten
dc.contributor.authorSejr, Mikaelen
dc.contributor.authorDalsgaard, Tageen
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-04T06:39:20Z-
dc.date.available2017-05-04T06:39:20Z-
dc.date.issued2017-04-21en
dc.identifier.citationMesa E, Delgado-Huertas A, Carrillo-de-Albornoz P, García-Corral LS, Sanz-Martín M, et al. (2017) Continuous daylight in the high-Arctic summer supports high plankton respiration rates compared to those supported in the dark. Scientific Reports 7. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-01203-7.en
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-017-01203-7en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/623322-
dc.description.abstractPlankton respiration rate is a major component of global CO2 production and is forecasted to increase rapidly in the Arctic with warming. Yet, existing assessments in the Arctic evaluated plankton respiration in the dark. Evidence that plankton respiration may be stimulated in the light is particularly relevant for the high Arctic where plankton communities experience continuous daylight in spring and summer. Here we demonstrate that plankton community respiration evaluated under the continuous daylight conditions present in situ, tends to be higher than that evaluated in the dark. The ratio between community respiration measured in the light (Rlight) and in the dark (Rdark) increased as the 2/3 power of Rlight so that the Rlight:Rdark ratio increased from an average value of 1.37 at the median Rlight measured here (3.62 µmol O2 L-1 d-1) to an average value of 17.56 at the highest Rlight measured here (15.8 µmol O2 L-1 d-1). The role of respiratory processes as a source of CO2 in the Arctic has, therefore, been underestimated and is far more important than previously believed, particularly in the late spring, with 24 h photoperiods, when community respiration rates are highest.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study is a contribution to projects ARCTICMET and ATOS, funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness (CTM2011-15792-E and POL2006-00550/CTM, respectively), the ATP project funded by the FP-7 of the EU (CTM2009-07781-E), and the CarbonBridge project (no. 226415) funded by the Norwegian Research Council. Work in Young Sound was funded by the Greenland Ecosystem Monitoring (GEM) program. We thank the crew of R/V Helmer Hanssen and Young Sound participants for support, and Arsenio Granados for the measurement of δ18O-H2O of spiked samples. We gratefully acknowledge the contributions from the Arctic Research Centre, Aarhus University. This work is a contribution to the Arctic Science Partnership (ASP) asp-net.org. M.S.-M. was supported by a La Caixa PhD fellowship. E.M. was supported by a JAE Pre-doc fellowship from the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and the BBVA Foundation, and a visiting student fellowship from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-01203-7en
dc.rightsThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleContinuous daylight in the high-Arctic summer supports high plankton respiration rates compared to those supported in the darken
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionInstituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra, CSIC-UGR, Avda. de las Palmeras 4, 18100, Armilla, Spain. emesacano@gmail.com.en
dc.contributor.institutionInstituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra, CSIC-UGR, Avda. de las Palmeras 4, 18100, Armilla, Spain.en
dc.contributor.institutionInstituto Mediterráneo de Estudios Avanzados (IMEDEA), CSIC-UiB, Miquel Marqués 21, 07190, Esporles, Spain.en
dc.contributor.institutionFacultat de Geologia, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.en
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Arctic and Marine Biology, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, N-9037, Tromsø, Norway.en
dc.contributor.institutionArctic Research Centre, Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.en
kaust.authorCarrillo-de-Albornoz, Palomaen
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