The Arctic Ocean as a dead end for floating plastics in the North Atlantic branch of the Thermohaline Circulation

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/623299
Title:
The Arctic Ocean as a dead end for floating plastics in the North Atlantic branch of the Thermohaline Circulation
Authors:
Cózar, Andrés; Martí, Elisa ( 0000-0002-0411-0069 ) ; Duarte, Carlos M. ( 0000-0002-1213-1361 ) ; García-de-Lomas, Juan ( 0000-0002-1818-1941 ) ; van Sebille, Erik ( 0000-0003-2041-0704 ) ; Ballatore, Thomas J.; Eguíluz, Victor M. ( 0000-0003-1133-1289 ) ; González-Gordillo, J. Ignacio ( 0000-0003-2859-3939 ) ; Pedrotti, Maria L. ( 0000-0002-9963-0402 ) ; Echevarría, Fidel ( 0000-0002-2662-5506 ) ; Troublè, Romain; Irigoien, Xabier
Abstract:
The subtropical ocean gyres are recognized as great marine accummulation zones of floating plastic debris; however, the possibility of plastic accumulation at polar latitudes has been overlooked because of the lack of nearby pollution sources. In the present study, the Arctic Ocean was extensively sampled for floating plastic debris from the Tara Oceans circumpolar expedition. Although plastic debris was scarce or absent in most of the Arctic waters, it reached high concentrations (hundreds of thousands of pieces per square kilometer) in the northernmost and easternmost areas of the Greenland and Barents seas. The fragmentation and typology of the plastic suggested an abundant presence of aged debris that originated from distant sources. This hypothesis was corroborated by the relatively high ratios of marine surface plastic to local pollution sources. Surface circulation models and field data showed that the poleward branch of the Thermohaline Circulation transfers floating debris from the North Atlantic to the Greenland and Barents seas, which would be a dead end for this plastic conveyor belt. Given the limited surface transport of the plastic that accumulated here and the mechanisms acting for the downward transport, the seafloor beneath this Arctic sector is hypothesized as an important sink of plastic debris.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Cózar A, Martí E, Duarte CM, García-de-Lomas J, van Sebille E, et al. (2017) The Arctic Ocean as a dead end for floating plastics in the North Atlantic branch of the Thermohaline Circulation. Science Advances 3: e1600582. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1600582.
Publisher:
American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
Journal:
Science Advances
Issue Date:
20-Apr-2017
DOI:
10.1126/sciadv.1600582
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2375-2548
Sponsors:
Tara Oceans particularly acknowledges the commitment of the following sponsors: the CNRS (in particular Groupement de Recherche GDR3280), the European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Genoscope/CEA, French Government “Investissements d’Avenir” programs OCEANOMICS (ANR-11-BTBR-0008) and FRANCE GENOMIQUE (ANR-10-INBS-09-08), Agence Nationale de la Recherche, and European Union FP7 (Micro B3 no. 287589). We appreciate the support and commitment of agnès b. and E. Bourgois, Veolia Environment Foundation, Region Bretagne, Lorient Agglomeration, World Courier, Illumina, Eléctricité de France Foundation, Fondation pour la recherche sur la biodiversité, Prince Albert II de Monaco Foundation, Tara Foundation, its schooner, and its teams. We are also grateful to the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs for supporting the expedition and to the countries that granted sampling permissions. Tara Oceans would not exist without continuous support from 23 institutes (http://oceans.taraexpeditions.org/en/m/science/les-labos-impliques/). This article is contribution number 52 of Tara Oceans. This study is funded by Tara Oceans and the Malaspina 2010 Expedition project (Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, CSD2008-00077) and has received additional support from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology through baseline funding to X.I. and C.M.D., Campus de Excelencia Internacional del Mar (CEIMAR), and PLASTREND (BBVA Foundation) and MIDaS (CTM2016-77106-R, AEI/FEDER/UE) projects.
Additional Links:
http://advances.sciencemag.org/content/3/4/e1600582
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCózar, Andrésen
dc.contributor.authorMartí, Elisaen
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en
dc.contributor.authorGarcía-de-Lomas, Juanen
dc.contributor.authorvan Sebille, Eriken
dc.contributor.authorBallatore, Thomas J.en
dc.contributor.authorEguíluz, Victor M.en
dc.contributor.authorGonzález-Gordillo, J. Ignacioen
dc.contributor.authorPedrotti, Maria L.en
dc.contributor.authorEchevarría, Fidelen
dc.contributor.authorTroublè, Romainen
dc.contributor.authorIrigoien, Xabieren
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-30T10:17:02Z-
dc.date.available2017-04-30T10:17:02Z-
dc.date.issued2017-04-20en
dc.identifier.citationCózar A, Martí E, Duarte CM, García-de-Lomas J, van Sebille E, et al. (2017) The Arctic Ocean as a dead end for floating plastics in the North Atlantic branch of the Thermohaline Circulation. Science Advances 3: e1600582. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/sciadv.1600582.en
dc.identifier.issn2375-2548en
dc.identifier.doi10.1126/sciadv.1600582en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/623299-
dc.description.abstractThe subtropical ocean gyres are recognized as great marine accummulation zones of floating plastic debris; however, the possibility of plastic accumulation at polar latitudes has been overlooked because of the lack of nearby pollution sources. In the present study, the Arctic Ocean was extensively sampled for floating plastic debris from the Tara Oceans circumpolar expedition. Although plastic debris was scarce or absent in most of the Arctic waters, it reached high concentrations (hundreds of thousands of pieces per square kilometer) in the northernmost and easternmost areas of the Greenland and Barents seas. The fragmentation and typology of the plastic suggested an abundant presence of aged debris that originated from distant sources. This hypothesis was corroborated by the relatively high ratios of marine surface plastic to local pollution sources. Surface circulation models and field data showed that the poleward branch of the Thermohaline Circulation transfers floating debris from the North Atlantic to the Greenland and Barents seas, which would be a dead end for this plastic conveyor belt. Given the limited surface transport of the plastic that accumulated here and the mechanisms acting for the downward transport, the seafloor beneath this Arctic sector is hypothesized as an important sink of plastic debris.en
dc.description.sponsorshipTara Oceans particularly acknowledges the commitment of the following sponsors: the CNRS (in particular Groupement de Recherche GDR3280), the European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Genoscope/CEA, French Government “Investissements d’Avenir” programs OCEANOMICS (ANR-11-BTBR-0008) and FRANCE GENOMIQUE (ANR-10-INBS-09-08), Agence Nationale de la Recherche, and European Union FP7 (Micro B3 no. 287589). We appreciate the support and commitment of agnès b. and E. Bourgois, Veolia Environment Foundation, Region Bretagne, Lorient Agglomeration, World Courier, Illumina, Eléctricité de France Foundation, Fondation pour la recherche sur la biodiversité, Prince Albert II de Monaco Foundation, Tara Foundation, its schooner, and its teams. We are also grateful to the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs for supporting the expedition and to the countries that granted sampling permissions. Tara Oceans would not exist without continuous support from 23 institutes (http://oceans.taraexpeditions.org/en/m/science/les-labos-impliques/). This article is contribution number 52 of Tara Oceans. This study is funded by Tara Oceans and the Malaspina 2010 Expedition project (Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, CSD2008-00077) and has received additional support from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology through baseline funding to X.I. and C.M.D., Campus de Excelencia Internacional del Mar (CEIMAR), and PLASTREND (BBVA Foundation) and MIDaS (CTM2016-77106-R, AEI/FEDER/UE) projects.en
dc.publisherAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)en
dc.relation.urlhttp://advances.sciencemag.org/content/3/4/e1600582en
dc.rightsThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial license, which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, so long as the resultant use is not for commercial advantage and provided the original work is properly cited.en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/en
dc.subjectArctic watersen
dc.subjectNorth Atlanticen
dc.subjectfloating plastic debrisen
dc.subjectthermohaline circulationen
dc.titleThe Arctic Ocean as a dead end for floating plastics in the North Atlantic branch of the Thermohaline Circulationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalScience Advancesen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartamento de Biología, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar y Ambientales, Universidad de Cádiz, Campus de Excelencia Internacional del Mar, E-11510 Puerto Real, Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionArctic Research Centre, Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, C.F. Møllers Allé 8, DK-8000 Århus C, Denmarken
dc.contributor.institutionGrantham Institute and Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London, U.Ken
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute for Marine and Atmospheric Research, Utrecht University, 3584 CC Utrecht, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionLake Basin Action Network, Moriyama 524-0063, Japanen
dc.contributor.institutionJohn A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionInstituto de Física Interdisciplinar y Sistemas Complejos (CSIC-UIB), E-07122 Palma de Mallorca, Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionSorbonne Universités, UPMC Universitè Paris 06, CNRS UMR 7076, Laboratoire d’oceanographie de Villefranche, Villefranque-sur-mer, Franceen
dc.contributor.institutionTara Expéditions, 75004 Paris, Franceen
dc.contributor.institutionAZTI–Marine Research, Herrera Kaia, Portualdea z/g, 20110 Pasaia (Gipuzkoa), Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionIKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao, Spainen
kaust.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en
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