The Ecology of Human Mobility

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/622908
Title:
The Ecology of Human Mobility
Authors:
Meekan, Mark G.; Duarte, Carlos M. ( 0000-0002-1213-1361 ) ; Fernández-Gracia, Juan; Thums, Michele; Sequeira, Ana M.M.; Harcourt, Rob; Eguíluz, Víctor M.
Abstract:
Mobile phones and other geolocated devices have produced unprecedented volumes of data on human movement. Analysis of pooled individual human trajectories using big data approaches has revealed a wealth of emergent features that have ecological parallels in animals across a diverse array of phenomena including commuting, epidemics, the spread of innovations and culture, and collective behaviour. Movement ecology, which explores how animals cope with and optimize variability in resources, has the potential to provide a theoretical framework to aid an understanding of human mobility and its impacts on ecosystems. In turn, big data on human movement can be explored in the context of animal movement ecology to provide solutions for urgent conservation problems and management challenges.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Meekan MG, Duarte CM, Fernández-Gracia J, Thums M, Sequeira AMM, et al. (2017) The Ecology of Human Mobility. Trends in Ecology & Evolution. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2016.12.006.
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Trends in Ecology & Evolution
KAUST Grant Number:
63150414
Issue Date:
3-Feb-2017
DOI:
10.1016/j.tree.2016.12.006
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0169-5347
Sponsors:
The research reported in this publication was supported by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) through the baseline fund and the Award No. 63150414 from the Office of Sponsored Research (OSR) and the Australian Institute of Marine Science. A.M.M.S. was supported by an IOMRC (AIMS, CSIRO, and UWA) Collaborative Post-doctoral Fellowship, J.F.-G. by NIH grant U54GM088558-06 (Lipsitch) and V.M.E. by Agencia Estatal de Investigación (AEI) and Fondo Europeo de Desarrollo Regional (FEDER) through project SPASIMM (FIS2016-80067-P (AEI/FEDER, UE)). We thank Ivan D. Gromicho for the artwork in Figure 1.
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169534716302397
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMeekan, Mark G.en
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en
dc.contributor.authorFernández-Gracia, Juanen
dc.contributor.authorThums, Micheleen
dc.contributor.authorSequeira, Ana M.M.en
dc.contributor.authorHarcourt, Roben
dc.contributor.authorEguíluz, Víctor M.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-15T08:32:16Z-
dc.date.available2017-02-15T08:32:16Z-
dc.date.issued2017-02-03en
dc.identifier.citationMeekan MG, Duarte CM, Fernández-Gracia J, Thums M, Sequeira AMM, et al. (2017) The Ecology of Human Mobility. Trends in Ecology & Evolution. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2016.12.006.en
dc.identifier.issn0169-5347en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.tree.2016.12.006en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/622908-
dc.description.abstractMobile phones and other geolocated devices have produced unprecedented volumes of data on human movement. Analysis of pooled individual human trajectories using big data approaches has revealed a wealth of emergent features that have ecological parallels in animals across a diverse array of phenomena including commuting, epidemics, the spread of innovations and culture, and collective behaviour. Movement ecology, which explores how animals cope with and optimize variability in resources, has the potential to provide a theoretical framework to aid an understanding of human mobility and its impacts on ecosystems. In turn, big data on human movement can be explored in the context of animal movement ecology to provide solutions for urgent conservation problems and management challenges.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe research reported in this publication was supported by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) through the baseline fund and the Award No. 63150414 from the Office of Sponsored Research (OSR) and the Australian Institute of Marine Science. A.M.M.S. was supported by an IOMRC (AIMS, CSIRO, and UWA) Collaborative Post-doctoral Fellowship, J.F.-G. by NIH grant U54GM088558-06 (Lipsitch) and V.M.E. by Agencia Estatal de Investigación (AEI) and Fondo Europeo de Desarrollo Regional (FEDER) through project SPASIMM (FIS2016-80067-P (AEI/FEDER, UE)). We thank Ivan D. Gromicho for the artwork in Figure 1.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169534716302397en
dc.titleThe Ecology of Human Mobilityen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalTrends in Ecology & Evolutionen
dc.contributor.institutionAustralian Institute of Marine Science, Indian Ocean Marine Research Centre (IOMRC), University of Western Australia (M470), 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionIOMRC and UWA Oceans Institute, The University of Western Australia, School of Animal Biology, M470, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionInstituto de Física Interdisciplinar y Sistemas Complejos IFISC (CSIC-UIB), E07122 Palma de Mallorca, Spainen
kaust.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en
kaust.grant.number63150414en
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