Static Response of Microbeams due to Capillary and Electrostatic Forces

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/622604
Title:
Static Response of Microbeams due to Capillary and Electrostatic Forces
Authors:
Bataineh, Ahmad M.; Ouakad, Hassen M.; Younis, Mohammad I. ( 0000-0002-9491-1838 )
Abstract:
Micro-sensors or micro-switches usually operate under the effect of electrostatic force and could face some environmental effects like humidity, which may lead to condensation underneath the beams and create strong capillary forces. Those tiny structures are principally made of microbeams that can undergo instabilities under the effect of those created huge capillary forces. In fact, during the fabrication of microbeams, there is an important step to separate the beam from its substrate (wet etching). After this step, the microstructure is dried, which may causes the onset of some droplets of water trapped underneath the beam that could bring about a huge capillary force pulling it toward its substrate. If this force is bigger than the microbeam's restoring force, it will become stuck to the substrate. This paper investigates the instability scenarios of both clamped-clamped (straight and curved) and cantilever (straight and curled) microbeams under the effect of capillary and/or electrostatic forces. The reduced order modeling (ROM) based on the Galerkin procedure is used to solve the nonlinear beam equations. The non-ideal boundaries are modeled by adding springs. The volume of the fluid between the beam and the substrate underneath it is varied and the relation between the volume of the water and the stability of the beam is shown. An analysis for the factors of which should be taken in to consideration in the fabrication processes to overcome the instability due to huge capillary forces is done. Also the size of the electrode for the electrostatic force is varied to show the effect on the micro-switch stability. A variation of the pull-in voltage with some specific beam parameters and with more than one case of electrode size is shown. It is found that capillary forces have a pronounced effect on the stability of microbeams. It is also found that the pull-in length decreases as the electrode size increases. It is also shown that the pull-in voltage decreases as the amount of fluid underneath the beam increases.
KAUST Department:
Mechanical Engineering Program
Citation:
Bataineh AM, Ouakad HM, Younis MI (2015) Static Response of Microbeams due to Capillary and Electrostatic Forces. Volume 10: Micro- and Nano-Systems Engineering and Packaging. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1115/IMECE2015-52037.
Publisher:
ASME International
Journal:
Volume 10: Micro- and Nano-Systems Engineering and Packaging
Conference/Event name:
ASME 2015 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2015
Issue Date:
7-Mar-2016
DOI:
10.1115/IMECE2015-52037
Type:
Conference Paper
Additional Links:
http://proceedings.asmedigitalcollection.asme.org/proceeding.aspx?articleid=2501267
Appears in Collections:
Conference Papers; Mechanical Engineering Program

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBataineh, Ahmad M.en
dc.contributor.authorOuakad, Hassen M.en
dc.contributor.authorYounis, Mohammad I.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-02T09:55:32Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-02T09:55:32Z-
dc.date.issued2016-03-07en
dc.identifier.citationBataineh AM, Ouakad HM, Younis MI (2015) Static Response of Microbeams due to Capillary and Electrostatic Forces. Volume 10: Micro- and Nano-Systems Engineering and Packaging. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1115/IMECE2015-52037.en
dc.identifier.doi10.1115/IMECE2015-52037en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/622604-
dc.description.abstractMicro-sensors or micro-switches usually operate under the effect of electrostatic force and could face some environmental effects like humidity, which may lead to condensation underneath the beams and create strong capillary forces. Those tiny structures are principally made of microbeams that can undergo instabilities under the effect of those created huge capillary forces. In fact, during the fabrication of microbeams, there is an important step to separate the beam from its substrate (wet etching). After this step, the microstructure is dried, which may causes the onset of some droplets of water trapped underneath the beam that could bring about a huge capillary force pulling it toward its substrate. If this force is bigger than the microbeam's restoring force, it will become stuck to the substrate. This paper investigates the instability scenarios of both clamped-clamped (straight and curved) and cantilever (straight and curled) microbeams under the effect of capillary and/or electrostatic forces. The reduced order modeling (ROM) based on the Galerkin procedure is used to solve the nonlinear beam equations. The non-ideal boundaries are modeled by adding springs. The volume of the fluid between the beam and the substrate underneath it is varied and the relation between the volume of the water and the stability of the beam is shown. An analysis for the factors of which should be taken in to consideration in the fabrication processes to overcome the instability due to huge capillary forces is done. Also the size of the electrode for the electrostatic force is varied to show the effect on the micro-switch stability. A variation of the pull-in voltage with some specific beam parameters and with more than one case of electrode size is shown. It is found that capillary forces have a pronounced effect on the stability of microbeams. It is also found that the pull-in length decreases as the electrode size increases. It is also shown that the pull-in voltage decreases as the amount of fluid underneath the beam increases.en
dc.publisherASME Internationalen
dc.relation.urlhttp://proceedings.asmedigitalcollection.asme.org/proceeding.aspx?articleid=2501267en
dc.titleStatic Response of Microbeams due to Capillary and Electrostatic Forcesen
dc.typeConference Paperen
dc.contributor.departmentMechanical Engineering Programen
dc.identifier.journalVolume 10: Micro- and Nano-Systems Engineering and Packagingen
dc.conference.date2015-11-13 to 2015-11-19en
dc.conference.nameASME 2015 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, IMECE 2015en
dc.conference.locationHouston, TX, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionMechanical Eng. Department, Jordan University of Science and Technology, P.O.Box 3030, Irbid, 22110, Jordanen
dc.contributor.institutionMechanical Engineering Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, PO Box. 31261, Dhahran, Saudi Arabiaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Mechanical Engineering, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, NY, 13902, United Statesen
kaust.authorYounis, Mohammad I.en
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