Elevated temperature increases carbon and nitrogen fluxes between phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria through physical attachment

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/622398
Title:
Elevated temperature increases carbon and nitrogen fluxes between phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria through physical attachment
Authors:
Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor; Weber, Peter K; Alonso-Sáez, Laura; Moran, Xose Anxelu G. ( 0000-0002-9823-5339 ) ; Mayali, Xavier
Abstract:
Quantifying the contribution of marine microorganisms to carbon and nitrogen cycles and their response to predicted ocean warming is one of the main challenges of microbial oceanography. Here we present a single-cell NanoSIMS isotope analysis to quantify C and N uptake by free-living and attached phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria, and their response to short-term experimental warming of 4 °C. Elevated temperature increased total C fixation by over 50%, a small but significant fraction of which was transferred to heterotrophs within 12 h. Cell-to-cell attachment doubled the secondary C uptake by heterotrophic bacteria and increased secondary N incorporation by autotrophs by 68%. Warming also increased the abundance of phytoplankton with attached heterotrophs by 80%, and promoted C transfer from phytoplankton to bacteria by 17% and N transfer from bacteria to phytoplankton by 50%. Our results indicate that phytoplankton-bacteria attachment provides an ecological advantage for nutrient incorporation, suggesting a mutualistic relationship that appears to be enhanced by temperature increases.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Arandia-Gorostidi N, Weber PK, Alonso-Sáez L, Morán XAG, Mayali X (2016) Elevated temperature increases carbon and nitrogen fluxes between phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria through physical attachment. The ISME Journal. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ismej.2016.156.
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
The ISME Journal
Issue Date:
6-Dec-2016
DOI:
10.1038/ismej.2016.156
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1751-7362; 1751-7370
Sponsors:
This work was partially supported by COMITE project by Spanish National Investigation+Development+Innovation (I+D+I). Financial support for NAG’s PhD fellowship was provided by the Basque Government. LAS was supported by a ‘Juan de la Cierva’ fellowship from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Education and a Marie Curie Reintegration Grant (FP7, Grant Agreement 268331). XM was partially supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Marine Microbiology Initiative grant #3302, and method development at LLNL was funded by the Department of Energy’s Genome Sciences Program grant SCW1039. Work at LLNL was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.
Additional Links:
http://www.nature.com/ismej/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/ismej2016156a.html
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorArandia-Gorostidi, Nestoren
dc.contributor.authorWeber, Peter Ken
dc.contributor.authorAlonso-Sáez, Lauraen
dc.contributor.authorMoran, Xose Anxelu G.en
dc.contributor.authorMayali, Xavieren
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-02T09:28:28Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-02T09:28:28Z-
dc.date.issued2016-12-06en
dc.identifier.citationArandia-Gorostidi N, Weber PK, Alonso-Sáez L, Morán XAG, Mayali X (2016) Elevated temperature increases carbon and nitrogen fluxes between phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria through physical attachment. The ISME Journal. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ismej.2016.156.en
dc.identifier.issn1751-7362en
dc.identifier.issn1751-7370en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/ismej.2016.156en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/622398-
dc.description.abstractQuantifying the contribution of marine microorganisms to carbon and nitrogen cycles and their response to predicted ocean warming is one of the main challenges of microbial oceanography. Here we present a single-cell NanoSIMS isotope analysis to quantify C and N uptake by free-living and attached phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria, and their response to short-term experimental warming of 4 °C. Elevated temperature increased total C fixation by over 50%, a small but significant fraction of which was transferred to heterotrophs within 12 h. Cell-to-cell attachment doubled the secondary C uptake by heterotrophic bacteria and increased secondary N incorporation by autotrophs by 68%. Warming also increased the abundance of phytoplankton with attached heterotrophs by 80%, and promoted C transfer from phytoplankton to bacteria by 17% and N transfer from bacteria to phytoplankton by 50%. Our results indicate that phytoplankton-bacteria attachment provides an ecological advantage for nutrient incorporation, suggesting a mutualistic relationship that appears to be enhanced by temperature increases.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was partially supported by COMITE project by Spanish National Investigation+Development+Innovation (I+D+I). Financial support for NAG’s PhD fellowship was provided by the Basque Government. LAS was supported by a ‘Juan de la Cierva’ fellowship from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Education and a Marie Curie Reintegration Grant (FP7, Grant Agreement 268331). XM was partially supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Marine Microbiology Initiative grant #3302, and method development at LLNL was funded by the Department of Energy’s Genome Sciences Program grant SCW1039. Work at LLNL was performed under the auspices of the US Department of Energy at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/ismej/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/ismej2016156a.htmlen
dc.titleElevated temperature increases carbon and nitrogen fluxes between phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria through physical attachmenten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalThe ISME Journalen
dc.contributor.institutionCentro Oceanográfico de Gijón/Xixón, Instituto Español de Oceanografía, Centro Oceanográfico de Gijón/Xixón, Gijón/Xixón, Asturias, Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionNuclear and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionAZTI, Sukarrieta, Bizkaia, Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionOregon State University, Microbiology Department, Corvallis, OR, USAen
kaust.authorMoran, Xose Anxelu G.en
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