Subsurface intake systems: Green choice for improving feed water quality at SWRO desalination plants, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/622340
Title:
Subsurface intake systems: Green choice for improving feed water quality at SWRO desalination plants, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Authors:
Dehwah, Abdullah; Missimer, Thomas M.
Abstract:
An investigation of three seawater reverse osmosis facilities located along the shoreline of the Red Sea of Saudi Arabia that use well intake systems showed that the pumping-induced flow of raw seawater through a coastal aquifer significantly improves feed water quality. A comparison between the surface seawater and the discharge from the wells shows that turbidity, algae, bacteria, total organic carbon, most fractions of natural organic matter (NOM), and particulate and colloidal transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) have significant reductions in concentration. Nearly all of the algae, up to 99% of the bacteria, between 84 and 100% of the biopolymer fraction of NOM, and a high percentage of the TEP were removed during transport. The data suggest that the flowpath length and hydraulic retention time in the aquifer play the most important roles in removal of the organic matter. Since the collective concentrations of bacteria, biopolymers, and TEP in the intake seawater play important roles in the biofouling of SWRO membranes, the observed reductions suggest that the desalination facilities that use well intakes systems will have a potentially lower fouling rate compared to open-ocean intake systems. Furthermore, well intake system intakes also reduce the need for chemical usage during complex pretreatment systems required for operation of SWRO facilities using open-ocean intakes and reduce environmental impacts.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
Citation:
Dehwah AHA, Missimer TM (2016) Subsurface intake systems: Green choice for improving feed water quality at SWRO desalination plants, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Water Research 88: 216–224. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2015.10.011.
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Water Research
Issue Date:
25-Oct-2015
DOI:
10.1016/j.watres.2015.10.011
PubMed ID:
26497939
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0043-1354
Sponsors:
Funding for this research was provided by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia. The authors thank the Water Desalination and Reuse Center for the use of analytical equipment. The authors thank Samir Al-Mashharawi, Khaled Bin Bandar, Nizar Jaber, Noor Zaouri and Sheng Li for field and lab support, the SAWACO company team, and Eng. Nizar Kammourie, Eng. Najm El-jafery, Eng.Firas Yaish, Eng. Safwan AL Issa, Mr. Jilly Edisan, Mr. Ronald Llamera, and Mr. Nestro Genterola for access to the facilities and on-site support.
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDehwah, Abdullahen
dc.contributor.authorMissimer, Thomas M.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-02T09:08:26Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-02T09:08:26Z-
dc.date.issued2015-10-25en
dc.identifier.citationDehwah AHA, Missimer TM (2016) Subsurface intake systems: Green choice for improving feed water quality at SWRO desalination plants, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Water Research 88: 216–224. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.watres.2015.10.011.en
dc.identifier.issn0043-1354en
dc.identifier.pmid26497939en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.watres.2015.10.011en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/622340-
dc.description.abstractAn investigation of three seawater reverse osmosis facilities located along the shoreline of the Red Sea of Saudi Arabia that use well intake systems showed that the pumping-induced flow of raw seawater through a coastal aquifer significantly improves feed water quality. A comparison between the surface seawater and the discharge from the wells shows that turbidity, algae, bacteria, total organic carbon, most fractions of natural organic matter (NOM), and particulate and colloidal transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) have significant reductions in concentration. Nearly all of the algae, up to 99% of the bacteria, between 84 and 100% of the biopolymer fraction of NOM, and a high percentage of the TEP were removed during transport. The data suggest that the flowpath length and hydraulic retention time in the aquifer play the most important roles in removal of the organic matter. Since the collective concentrations of bacteria, biopolymers, and TEP in the intake seawater play important roles in the biofouling of SWRO membranes, the observed reductions suggest that the desalination facilities that use well intakes systems will have a potentially lower fouling rate compared to open-ocean intake systems. Furthermore, well intake system intakes also reduce the need for chemical usage during complex pretreatment systems required for operation of SWRO facilities using open-ocean intakes and reduce environmental impacts.en
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding for this research was provided by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, Thuwal, Saudi Arabia. The authors thank the Water Desalination and Reuse Center for the use of analytical equipment. The authors thank Samir Al-Mashharawi, Khaled Bin Bandar, Nizar Jaber, Noor Zaouri and Sheng Li for field and lab support, the SAWACO company team, and Eng. Nizar Kammourie, Eng. Najm El-jafery, Eng.Firas Yaish, Eng. Safwan AL Issa, Mr. Jilly Edisan, Mr. Ronald Llamera, and Mr. Nestro Genterola for access to the facilities and on-site support.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.subjectMembrane fouling/biofoulingen
dc.subjectSeawater reverse osmosisen
dc.subjectSubsurface intakesen
dc.subjectTransparent exopolymer particlesen
dc.subjectWell systemen
dc.titleSubsurface intake systems: Green choice for improving feed water quality at SWRO desalination plants, Jeddah, Saudi Arabiaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.identifier.journalWater Researchen
dc.contributor.institutionU. A. Whitaker College of Engineering, Florida Gulf Coast University, 10501 FGCU Boulevard South, Fort Myers, FL, 33965-6565, United Statesen
kaust.authorDehwah, Abdullahen
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