Schlenk Techniques for Anionic Polymerization

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/622247
Title:
Schlenk Techniques for Anionic Polymerization
Authors:
Ratkanthwar, Kedar ( 0000-0002-6324-696X ) ; Zhao, Junpeng; Zhang, Hefeng; Hadjichristidis, Nikolaos ( 0000-0003-1442-1714 ) ; Mays, Jimmy
Abstract:
Anionic polymerization-high vacuum techniques (HVTs) are doubtlessly the most prominent and reliable experimental tools to prepare polymer samples with well-defined and, in many cases, complex macromolecular architectures. Due to the high demands for time and skilled technical personnel, HVTs are currently used in only a few research laboratories worldwide. Instead, most researchers in this filed are attracted to more facile Schlenk techniques. The basic principle of this technique followed in all laboratories is substantially the same, i.e. the use of alternate vacuum and inert gas atmosphere in glass apparatus for the purification/charging of monomer, solvents, additives, and for the manipulation of air-sensitive compounds such as alkyl metal initiators, organometallic or organic catalysts. However, it is executed quite differently in each research group in terms of the structure of Schlenk apparatus (manifolds, connections, purification/storage flasks, reactors, etc.), the use of small supplementary devices (soft tubing, cannulas, stopcocks, etc.) and experimental procedures. The operational methods are partly purpose-oriented while also featured by a high flexibility, which makes it impossible to describe in detail each specific one. In this chapter we will briefly exemplify the application of Schlenk techniques for anionic polymerization by describing the performance of a few experiments from our own work.
KAUST Department:
KAUST Catalysis Center (KCC); Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
Citation:
Ratkanthwar K, Zhao J, Zhang H, Hadjichristidis N, Mays J (2015) Schlenk Techniques for Anionic Polymerization. Anionic Polymerization: 3–18. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-4-431-54186-8_1.
Publisher:
Springer Science + Business Media
Journal:
Anionic Polymerization
Issue Date:
1-Sep-2015
DOI:
10.1007/978-4-431-54186-8_1
Type:
Book Chapter
Appears in Collections:
Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division; KAUST Catalysis Center (KCC); Book Chapters

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRatkanthwar, Kedaren
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Junpengen
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Hefengen
dc.contributor.authorHadjichristidis, Nikolaosen
dc.contributor.authorMays, Jimmyen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-02T08:42:40Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-02T08:42:40Z-
dc.date.issued2015-09-01en
dc.identifier.citationRatkanthwar K, Zhao J, Zhang H, Hadjichristidis N, Mays J (2015) Schlenk Techniques for Anionic Polymerization. Anionic Polymerization: 3–18. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-4-431-54186-8_1.en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/978-4-431-54186-8_1en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/622247-
dc.description.abstractAnionic polymerization-high vacuum techniques (HVTs) are doubtlessly the most prominent and reliable experimental tools to prepare polymer samples with well-defined and, in many cases, complex macromolecular architectures. Due to the high demands for time and skilled technical personnel, HVTs are currently used in only a few research laboratories worldwide. Instead, most researchers in this filed are attracted to more facile Schlenk techniques. The basic principle of this technique followed in all laboratories is substantially the same, i.e. the use of alternate vacuum and inert gas atmosphere in glass apparatus for the purification/charging of monomer, solvents, additives, and for the manipulation of air-sensitive compounds such as alkyl metal initiators, organometallic or organic catalysts. However, it is executed quite differently in each research group in terms of the structure of Schlenk apparatus (manifolds, connections, purification/storage flasks, reactors, etc.), the use of small supplementary devices (soft tubing, cannulas, stopcocks, etc.) and experimental procedures. The operational methods are partly purpose-oriented while also featured by a high flexibility, which makes it impossible to describe in detail each specific one. In this chapter we will briefly exemplify the application of Schlenk techniques for anionic polymerization by describing the performance of a few experiments from our own work.en
dc.publisherSpringer Science + Business Mediaen
dc.subjectAnionic polymerizationen
dc.subjectLiving polymerizationen
dc.subjectSchlenk techniquesen
dc.subjectVacuum gas manifolden
dc.titleSchlenk Techniques for Anionic Polymerizationen
dc.typeBook Chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentKAUST Catalysis Center (KCC)en
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalAnionic Polymerizationen
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou, Chinaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionChemical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, United Statesen
kaust.authorRatkanthwar, Kedaren
kaust.authorZhang, Hefengen
kaust.authorHadjichristidis, Nikolaosen
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