Development and characterization of new polymorphic microsatellite markers in four sea anemones: Entacmaea quadricolor, Heteractis magnifica, Stichodactyla gigantea, and Stichodactyla mertensii

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/622189
Title:
Development and characterization of new polymorphic microsatellite markers in four sea anemones: Entacmaea quadricolor, Heteractis magnifica, Stichodactyla gigantea, and Stichodactyla mertensii
Authors:
Gatins, Remy ( 0000-0002-1786-9381 ) ; Saenz-Agudelo, Pablo; Scott, Anna; Berumen, Michael L. ( 0000-0003-2463-2742 )
Abstract:
Relatively few studies have investigated the genetic population structure of sea anemones. This is particularly true for sea anemones that host some of the most iconic fishes on coral reefs, the anemonefishes. One of the main reasons for this knowledge gap is the lack of appropriate genetic markers. We developed and characterized a total of 47 novel polymorphic microsatellite markers for four host sea anemone species from the Indo-Pacific: Entacmaea quadricolor (n = 16 microsatellite markers), Heteractis magnifica (n = 8), Stichodactyla mertensii (n = 13), and Stichodactyla gigantea (n = 10). Here, we report genetic diversity statistics from two different sampling locations for each anemone species. Overall, we found that most markers were highly polymorphic. On average, we found a mean of seven alleles per locus. Observed and expected heterozygosities displayed high variation among loci, ranging from 0.033 to 0.980 and from 0.038 to 0.927, respectively. Only four loci showed deviations of Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium in both populations and were identified as having null alleles. Additionally, two pairs of loci were identified to be in linkage disequilibrium in only one population. Host anemones are highly sought after in the marine aquarium trade and are susceptible to thermal bleaching. Although most studies focus on their obligate symbionts (the anemonefish), genetic analyses of host sea anemones can expand our understanding of the biology, connectivity, and population structure of these organisms and potentially help develop conservation strategies that will aid both the host and its symbionts.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Gatins R, Saenz-Agudelo P, Scott A, Berumen ML (2016) Development and characterization of new polymorphic microsatellite markers in four sea anemones: Entacmaea quadricolor, Heteractis magnifica, Stichodactyla gigantea, and Stichodactyla mertensii. Marine Biodiversity. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12526-016-0576-0.
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Marine Biodiversity
Issue Date:
8-Oct-2016
DOI:
10.1007/s12526-016-0576-0
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1867-1616; 1867-1624
Sponsors:
KAUST Office of Competitive Research Funds[CRG-1-BER-002]; KAUST Baseline Research Funding[NA]
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGatins, Remyen
dc.contributor.authorSaenz-Agudelo, Pabloen
dc.contributor.authorScott, Annaen
dc.contributor.authorBerumen, Michael L.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-02T08:42:36Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-02T08:42:36Z-
dc.date.issued2016-10-08en
dc.identifier.citationGatins R, Saenz-Agudelo P, Scott A, Berumen ML (2016) Development and characterization of new polymorphic microsatellite markers in four sea anemones: Entacmaea quadricolor, Heteractis magnifica, Stichodactyla gigantea, and Stichodactyla mertensii. Marine Biodiversity. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12526-016-0576-0.en
dc.identifier.issn1867-1616en
dc.identifier.issn1867-1624en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12526-016-0576-0en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/622189-
dc.description.abstractRelatively few studies have investigated the genetic population structure of sea anemones. This is particularly true for sea anemones that host some of the most iconic fishes on coral reefs, the anemonefishes. One of the main reasons for this knowledge gap is the lack of appropriate genetic markers. We developed and characterized a total of 47 novel polymorphic microsatellite markers for four host sea anemone species from the Indo-Pacific: Entacmaea quadricolor (n = 16 microsatellite markers), Heteractis magnifica (n = 8), Stichodactyla mertensii (n = 13), and Stichodactyla gigantea (n = 10). Here, we report genetic diversity statistics from two different sampling locations for each anemone species. Overall, we found that most markers were highly polymorphic. On average, we found a mean of seven alleles per locus. Observed and expected heterozygosities displayed high variation among loci, ranging from 0.033 to 0.980 and from 0.038 to 0.927, respectively. Only four loci showed deviations of Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium in both populations and were identified as having null alleles. Additionally, two pairs of loci were identified to be in linkage disequilibrium in only one population. Host anemones are highly sought after in the marine aquarium trade and are susceptible to thermal bleaching. Although most studies focus on their obligate symbionts (the anemonefish), genetic analyses of host sea anemones can expand our understanding of the biology, connectivity, and population structure of these organisms and potentially help develop conservation strategies that will aid both the host and its symbionts.en
dc.description.sponsorshipKAUST Office of Competitive Research Funds[CRG-1-BER-002]en
dc.description.sponsorshipKAUST Baseline Research Funding[NA]en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.subjectCnidarianen
dc.subjectConnectivityen
dc.subjectHost anemoneen
dc.subjectPapua New Guineaen
dc.subjectPopulation geneticsen
dc.subjectRed Seaen
dc.titleDevelopment and characterization of new polymorphic microsatellite markers in four sea anemones: Entacmaea quadricolor, Heteractis magnifica, Stichodactyla gigantea, and Stichodactyla mertensiien
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalMarine Biodiversityen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California Santa Cruz, 100 Shaffer Road, Santa Cruz, CA, 95060, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionFacultad de Ciencias, Instituto de Ciencias Ambientales y Evolutivas, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chileen
dc.contributor.institutionNational Marine Science Centre and Marine Ecology Research Centre, School of Environmental Science and Management, Southern Cross University, PO Box 4321, Coffs Harbour, NSW, 2450, Australiaen
kaust.authorGatins, Remyen
kaust.authorBerumen, Michael L.en
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