Can mud (silt and clay) concentration be used to predict soil organic carbon content within seagrass ecosystems?

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/622017
Title:
Can mud (silt and clay) concentration be used to predict soil organic carbon content within seagrass ecosystems?
Authors:
Serrano, Oscar; Lavery, Paul S. ( 0000-0001-5162-273X ) ; Duarte, Carlos M. ( 0000-0002-1213-1361 ) ; Kendrick, Gary A.; Calafat, Antoni; York, Paul H. ( 0000-0003-3530-4146 ) ; Steven, Andy; Macreadie, Peter I.
Abstract:
The emerging field of blue carbon science is seeking cost-effective ways to estimate the organic carbon content of soils that are bound by coastal vegetated ecosystems. Organic carbon (C-org) content in terrestrial soils and marine sediments has been correlated with mud content (i.e., silt and clay, particle sizes <63 mu m), however, empirical tests of this theory are lacking for coastal vegetated ecosystems. Here, we compiled data (n = 1345) on the relationship between C-org and mud contents in seagrass ecosystems (79 cores) and adjacent bare sediments (21 cores) to address whether mud can be used to predict soil C-org content. We also combined these data with the delta C-13 signatures of the soil C-org to understand the sources of Corg stores. The results showed that mud is positively correlated with soil C-org content only when the contribution of seagrass-derived C-org to the sedimentary C-org pool is relatively low, such as in small and fast-growing meadows of the genera Zostera, Halodule and Halophila, and in bare sediments adjacent to seagrass ecosystems. In large and long-living seagrass meadows of the genera Posidonia and Amphibolis there was a lack of, or poor relationship between mud and soil C-org content, related to a higher contribution of seagrass-derived C-org to the sedimentary C-org pool in these meadows. The relatively high soil C-org contents with relatively low mud contents (e.g., mud-C-org saturation) in bare sediments and Zostera, Halodule and Halophila meadows was related to significant allochthonous inputs of terrestrial organic matter, while higher contribution of seagrass detritus in Amphibolis and Posidonia meadows disrupted the correlation expected between soil C-org and mud contents. This study shows that mud is not a universal proxy for blue carbon content in seagrass ecosystems, and therefore should not be applied generally across all seagrass habitats. Mud content can only be used as a proxy to estimate soil C-org content for scaling up purposes when opportunistic and/or low biomass seagrass species (i.e., Zostera, Halodule and Halophila) are present (explaining 34 to 91% of variability), and in bare sediments (explaining 78% of the variability). The results obtained could enable robust scaling up exercises at a low cost as part of blue carbon stock assessments.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Serrano O, Lavery PS, Duarte CM, Kendrick GA, Calafat A, et al. (2016) Can mud (silt and clay) concentration be used to predict soil organic carbon content within seagrass ecosystems? Biogeosciences 13: 4915–4926. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-4915-2016.
Publisher:
Copernicus GmbH
Journal:
Biogeosciences
Issue Date:
7-Sep-2016
DOI:
10.5194/bg-13-4915-2016; 10.5194/bg-2015-598
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1726-4189
Sponsors:
This work was supported by the ECU Faculty Research Grant Scheme, the ECU Early Career Research Grant Scheme, and the CSIRO Flagship Marine & Coastal Carbon Biogeochemical Cluster (Coastal Carbon Cluster) with funding from the CSIRO Flagship Collaboration Fund. Peter Macreadie was supported by an ARC DECRA DE130101084. The authors are grateful to M. Rozaimi, A. Gera, P. Bouvais, A. Ricart, C. Bryant, G. Skilbeck, M. Rozaimi, A. Esteban, M. A. Mateo, P. Donaldson, C. Sharples and R. Mount for their help in field and/or laboratory tasks.
Additional Links:
http://www.biogeosciences.net/13/4915/2016/; http://www.biogeosciences-discuss.net/bg-2015-598/
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSerrano, Oscaren
dc.contributor.authorLavery, Paul S.en
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en
dc.contributor.authorKendrick, Gary A.en
dc.contributor.authorCalafat, Antonien
dc.contributor.authorYork, Paul H.en
dc.contributor.authorSteven, Andyen
dc.contributor.authorMacreadie, Peter I.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-14T08:30:12Z-
dc.date.available2016-12-14T08:30:12Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-07en
dc.identifier.citationSerrano O, Lavery PS, Duarte CM, Kendrick GA, Calafat A, et al. (2016) Can mud (silt and clay) concentration be used to predict soil organic carbon content within seagrass ecosystems? Biogeosciences 13: 4915–4926. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/bg-13-4915-2016.en
dc.identifier.issn1726-4189en
dc.identifier.doi10.5194/bg-13-4915-2016en
dc.identifier.doi10.5194/bg-2015-598en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/622017-
dc.description.abstractThe emerging field of blue carbon science is seeking cost-effective ways to estimate the organic carbon content of soils that are bound by coastal vegetated ecosystems. Organic carbon (C-org) content in terrestrial soils and marine sediments has been correlated with mud content (i.e., silt and clay, particle sizes <63 mu m), however, empirical tests of this theory are lacking for coastal vegetated ecosystems. Here, we compiled data (n = 1345) on the relationship between C-org and mud contents in seagrass ecosystems (79 cores) and adjacent bare sediments (21 cores) to address whether mud can be used to predict soil C-org content. We also combined these data with the delta C-13 signatures of the soil C-org to understand the sources of Corg stores. The results showed that mud is positively correlated with soil C-org content only when the contribution of seagrass-derived C-org to the sedimentary C-org pool is relatively low, such as in small and fast-growing meadows of the genera Zostera, Halodule and Halophila, and in bare sediments adjacent to seagrass ecosystems. In large and long-living seagrass meadows of the genera Posidonia and Amphibolis there was a lack of, or poor relationship between mud and soil C-org content, related to a higher contribution of seagrass-derived C-org to the sedimentary C-org pool in these meadows. The relatively high soil C-org contents with relatively low mud contents (e.g., mud-C-org saturation) in bare sediments and Zostera, Halodule and Halophila meadows was related to significant allochthonous inputs of terrestrial organic matter, while higher contribution of seagrass detritus in Amphibolis and Posidonia meadows disrupted the correlation expected between soil C-org and mud contents. This study shows that mud is not a universal proxy for blue carbon content in seagrass ecosystems, and therefore should not be applied generally across all seagrass habitats. Mud content can only be used as a proxy to estimate soil C-org content for scaling up purposes when opportunistic and/or low biomass seagrass species (i.e., Zostera, Halodule and Halophila) are present (explaining 34 to 91% of variability), and in bare sediments (explaining 78% of the variability). The results obtained could enable robust scaling up exercises at a low cost as part of blue carbon stock assessments.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the ECU Faculty Research Grant Scheme, the ECU Early Career Research Grant Scheme, and the CSIRO Flagship Marine & Coastal Carbon Biogeochemical Cluster (Coastal Carbon Cluster) with funding from the CSIRO Flagship Collaboration Fund. Peter Macreadie was supported by an ARC DECRA DE130101084. The authors are grateful to M. Rozaimi, A. Gera, P. Bouvais, A. Ricart, C. Bryant, G. Skilbeck, M. Rozaimi, A. Esteban, M. A. Mateo, P. Donaldson, C. Sharples and R. Mount for their help in field and/or laboratory tasks.en
dc.publisherCopernicus GmbHen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.biogeosciences.net/13/4915/2016/en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.biogeosciences-discuss.net/bg-2015-598/en
dc.rights© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.en
dc.titleCan mud (silt and clay) concentration be used to predict soil organic carbon content within seagrass ecosystems?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalBiogeosciencesen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Natural Sciences, Centre for Marine Ecosystems Research, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionUWA Oceans Institute, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionCentro de Estudios Avanzados de Blanes, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Blanes, Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Plant Biology, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionGRC Geociències Marines, Departament de Dinàmica de la Terra i de l'Oceà, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Tropical Water and Aquatic Ecosystem Research (TropWATER), James Cook University, Cairns, QLD, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionCSIRO, EcoSciences Precinct - Dutton Park, 41 Boggo Road, Dutton-Park, QLD, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for Integrative Ecology, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University, Burwood, VIC, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionPlant Functional Biology and Climate Change Cluster, University of Technology Sydney, Broadway, NSW, Australiaen
kaust.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en
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