Seagrass (Posidonia oceanica) seedlings in a high-CO2 world: from physiology to herbivory

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/621926
Title:
Seagrass (Posidonia oceanica) seedlings in a high-CO2 world: from physiology to herbivory
Authors:
Hernán, Gema; Ramajo, Laura; Basso, Lorena; Delgado, Antonio; Terrados, Jorge; Duarte, Carlos M. ( 0000-0002-1213-1361 ) ; Tomas, Fiona
Abstract:
Under future increased CO2 concentrations, seagrasses are predicted to perform better as a result of increased photosynthesis, but the effects in carbon balance and growth are unclear and remain unexplored for early life stages such as seedlings, which allow plant dispersal and provide the potential for adaptation under changing environmental conditions. Furthermore, the outcome of the concomitant biochemical changes in plant-herbivore interactions has been poorly studied, yet may have important implications in plant communities. In this study we determined the effects of experimental exposure to current and future predicted CO2 concentrations on the physiology, size and defense strategies against herbivory in the earliest life stage of the Mediterranean seagrass Posidonia oceanica. The photosynthetic performance of seedlings, assessed by fluorescence, improved under increased pCO2 conditions after 60 days, although these differences disappeared after 90 days. Furthermore, these plants exhibited bigger seeds and higher carbon storage in belowground tissues, having thus more resources to tolerate and recover from stressors. Of the several herbivory resistance traits measured, plants under high pCO2 conditions had a lower leaf N content but higher sucrose. These seedlings were preferred by herbivorous sea urchins in feeding trials, which could potentially counteract some of the positive effects observed.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Hernán G, Ramajo L, Basso L, Delgado A, Terrados J, et al. (2016) Seagrass (Posidonia oceanica) seedlings in a high-CO2 world: from physiology to herbivory. Scientific Reports 6: 38017. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep38017.
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Scientific Reports
Issue Date:
1-Dec-2016
DOI:
10.1038/srep38017
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2045-2322
Sponsors:
E. Cerezo, E. Oliver, and D. Rita helped with set up and sample preparation. GH was supported by the Graduate Fellowship Program co-funded by the European Social Fund and the Government of the Balearic Islands (Conselleria d´Educació, Cultura i Universitats). LR was supported during this experiment by Becas Chile fellowship program from Comisión Nacional de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica de Chile (CONICYT). This study was supported by POSIPLANT (CTM2011-27377) to JT and FT, EstresX project (CTM2012-32603) and MedSeA (FP7-ENV-2010-265103) to CMD and the Ramón y Cajal Program to FT.
Additional Links:
http://www.nature.com/articles/srep38017
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHernán, Gemaen
dc.contributor.authorRamajo, Lauraen
dc.contributor.authorBasso, Lorenaen
dc.contributor.authorDelgado, Antonioen
dc.contributor.authorTerrados, Jorgeen
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en
dc.contributor.authorTomas, Fionaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-04T13:43:56Z-
dc.date.available2016-12-04T13:43:56Z-
dc.date.issued2016-12-01en
dc.identifier.citationHernán G, Ramajo L, Basso L, Delgado A, Terrados J, et al. (2016) Seagrass (Posidonia oceanica) seedlings in a high-CO2 world: from physiology to herbivory. Scientific Reports 6: 38017. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep38017.en
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep38017en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/621926-
dc.description.abstractUnder future increased CO2 concentrations, seagrasses are predicted to perform better as a result of increased photosynthesis, but the effects in carbon balance and growth are unclear and remain unexplored for early life stages such as seedlings, which allow plant dispersal and provide the potential for adaptation under changing environmental conditions. Furthermore, the outcome of the concomitant biochemical changes in plant-herbivore interactions has been poorly studied, yet may have important implications in plant communities. In this study we determined the effects of experimental exposure to current and future predicted CO2 concentrations on the physiology, size and defense strategies against herbivory in the earliest life stage of the Mediterranean seagrass Posidonia oceanica. The photosynthetic performance of seedlings, assessed by fluorescence, improved under increased pCO2 conditions after 60 days, although these differences disappeared after 90 days. Furthermore, these plants exhibited bigger seeds and higher carbon storage in belowground tissues, having thus more resources to tolerate and recover from stressors. Of the several herbivory resistance traits measured, plants under high pCO2 conditions had a lower leaf N content but higher sucrose. These seedlings were preferred by herbivorous sea urchins in feeding trials, which could potentially counteract some of the positive effects observed.en
dc.description.sponsorshipE. Cerezo, E. Oliver, and D. Rita helped with set up and sample preparation. GH was supported by the Graduate Fellowship Program co-funded by the European Social Fund and the Government of the Balearic Islands (Conselleria d´Educació, Cultura i Universitats). LR was supported during this experiment by Becas Chile fellowship program from Comisión Nacional de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica de Chile (CONICYT). This study was supported by POSIPLANT (CTM2011-27377) to JT and FT, EstresX project (CTM2012-32603) and MedSeA (FP7-ENV-2010-265103) to CMD and the Ramón y Cajal Program to FT.en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/srep38017en
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleSeagrass (Posidonia oceanica) seedlings in a high-CO2 world: from physiology to herbivoryen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartament of Ecology and Marine Resources, Mediterranean institute for advanced studies (CSIC-UIB), 07190, Esporles, Balearic Islands, Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartament of Global Change Research, Mediterranean institute for advanced studies (CSIC-UIB), 07190, Esporles, Balearic Islands, Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Science, Liberal Arts School. Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez, 2640, Santiago, Chileen
dc.contributor.institutionCenter of Research and Innovation for Climate Change (CiiCC). Universidad Santo Tomás, Santiago, Chileen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biological and Environmental Sciences and Technologies (DiSTeBA), University of Salento, 73100 Lecce, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionStable Isotope Biogeochemistry Laboratory, Andalusian Institute of Earth Science (CSIC-UGR), 18100 Armilla, Granada, Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR, USAen
kaust.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en
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