Impacts of brown carbon from biomass burning on surface UV and ozone photochemistry in the Amazon Basin

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/621860
Title:
Impacts of brown carbon from biomass burning on surface UV and ozone photochemistry in the Amazon Basin
Authors:
Mok, Jungbin; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Arola, Antti; Torres, Omar; Jethva, Hiren; Andrade, Marcos; Labow, Gordon; Eck, Thomas F.; Li, Zhanqing; Dickerson, Russell R.; Stenchikov, Georgiy L. ( 0000-0001-9033-4925 ) ; Osipov, Sergey; Ren, Xinrong
Abstract:
The spectral dependence of light absorption by atmospheric particulate matter has major implications for air quality and climate forcing, but remains uncertain especially in tropical areas with extensive biomass burning. In the September-October 2007 biomass-burning season in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, we studied light absorbing (chromophoric) organic or “brown” carbon (BrC) with surface and space-based remote sensing. We found that BrC has negligible absorption at visible wavelengths, but significant absorption and strong spectral dependence at UV wavelengths. Using the ground-based inversion of column effective imaginary refractive index in the range 305–368 nm, we quantified a strong spectral dependence of absorption by BrC in the UV and diminished ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation reaching the surface. Reduced UV-B means less erythema, plant damage, and slower photolysis rates. We use a photochemical box model to show that relative to black carbon (BC) alone, the combined optical properties of BrC and BC slow the net rate of production of ozone by up to 18% and lead to reduced concentrations of radicals OH, HO2, and RO2 by up to 17%, 15%, and 14%, respectively. The optical properties of BrC aerosol change in subtle ways the generally adverse effects of smoke from biomass burning.
KAUST Department:
Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division
Citation:
Mok J, Krotkov NA, Arola A, Torres O, Jethva H, et al. (2016) Impacts of brown carbon from biomass burning on surface UV and ozone photochemistry in the Amazon Basin. Scientific Reports 6: 36940. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep36940.
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Scientific Reports
Issue Date:
11-Nov-2016
DOI:
10.1038/srep36940
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2045-2322
Sponsors:
J.M. and Z.L. were supported by ESSIC–NASA Master grant (5266960), the National Science Foundation (AGS1118325, AGS1534670), MOST (2013CB955804), and NSFC (91544217). G.S. and S.O. were supported by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) and used the resources of the Supercomputing Laboratory at KAUST in Thuwal, Saudi Arabia. The authors acknowledge support from NASA Earth Science Division, Radiation Sciences and Atmospheric Composition programs. The authors also thank the AERONET and UV-B Monitoring and Research Program team members.
Additional Links:
http://www.nature.com/articles/srep36940
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Physical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMok, Jungbinen
dc.contributor.authorKrotkov, Nickolay A.en
dc.contributor.authorArola, Anttien
dc.contributor.authorTorres, Omaren
dc.contributor.authorJethva, Hirenen
dc.contributor.authorAndrade, Marcosen
dc.contributor.authorLabow, Gordonen
dc.contributor.authorEck, Thomas F.en
dc.contributor.authorLi, Zhanqingen
dc.contributor.authorDickerson, Russell R.en
dc.contributor.authorStenchikov, Georgiy L.en
dc.contributor.authorOsipov, Sergeyen
dc.contributor.authorRen, Xinrongen
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-22T13:40:07Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-22T13:40:07Z-
dc.date.issued2016-11-11en
dc.identifier.citationMok J, Krotkov NA, Arola A, Torres O, Jethva H, et al. (2016) Impacts of brown carbon from biomass burning on surface UV and ozone photochemistry in the Amazon Basin. Scientific Reports 6: 36940. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep36940.en
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep36940en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/621860-
dc.description.abstractThe spectral dependence of light absorption by atmospheric particulate matter has major implications for air quality and climate forcing, but remains uncertain especially in tropical areas with extensive biomass burning. In the September-October 2007 biomass-burning season in Santa Cruz, Bolivia, we studied light absorbing (chromophoric) organic or “brown” carbon (BrC) with surface and space-based remote sensing. We found that BrC has negligible absorption at visible wavelengths, but significant absorption and strong spectral dependence at UV wavelengths. Using the ground-based inversion of column effective imaginary refractive index in the range 305–368 nm, we quantified a strong spectral dependence of absorption by BrC in the UV and diminished ultraviolet B (UV-B) radiation reaching the surface. Reduced UV-B means less erythema, plant damage, and slower photolysis rates. We use a photochemical box model to show that relative to black carbon (BC) alone, the combined optical properties of BrC and BC slow the net rate of production of ozone by up to 18% and lead to reduced concentrations of radicals OH, HO2, and RO2 by up to 17%, 15%, and 14%, respectively. The optical properties of BrC aerosol change in subtle ways the generally adverse effects of smoke from biomass burning.en
dc.description.sponsorshipJ.M. and Z.L. were supported by ESSIC–NASA Master grant (5266960), the National Science Foundation (AGS1118325, AGS1534670), MOST (2013CB955804), and NSFC (91544217). G.S. and S.O. were supported by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) and used the resources of the Supercomputing Laboratory at KAUST in Thuwal, Saudi Arabia. The authors acknowledge support from NASA Earth Science Division, Radiation Sciences and Atmospheric Composition programs. The authors also thank the AERONET and UV-B Monitoring and Research Program team members.en
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/srep36940en
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleImpacts of brown carbon from biomass burning on surface UV and ozone photochemistry in the Amazon Basinen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPhysical Sciences and Engineering (PSE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science (AOSC), University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionEarth System Science Interdisciplinary Center (ESSIC), College Park, Maryland, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionNASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionFinnish Meteorological Institute, Kuopio, Finlanden
dc.contributor.institutionUniversities Space Research Association, Columbia, Maryland, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratory for Atmospheric Physics, Institute for Physics Research, Universidad Mayor de San Andres, La Paz, Boliviaen
dc.contributor.institutionScience Systems and Applications, Inc., Lanham, Maryland, USAen
dc.contributor.institutionState Laboratory of Earth Surface Process and Resource Ecology, College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, Chinaen
dc.contributor.institutionNOAA Air Resources Laboratory, College Park, Maryland, USAen
kaust.authorStenchikov, Georgiy L.en
kaust.authorOsipov, Sergeyen
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