Flawed citation practices facilitate the unsubstantiated perception of a global trend toward increased jellyfish blooms

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/621769
Title:
Flawed citation practices facilitate the unsubstantiated perception of a global trend toward increased jellyfish blooms
Authors:
Sanz-Martín, Marina; Pitt, Kylie A.; Condon, Robert H.; Lucas, Cathy H.; Novaes de Santana, Charles; Duarte, Carlos M. ( 0000-0002-1213-1361 )
Abstract:
Speculation over a global rise in jellyfish populations has become widespread in the scientific literature, but until recently the purported ‘global increase’ had not been tested. Here we present a citation analysis of peer-reviewed literature to track the evolution of the current perception of increases in jellyfish and identify key papers involved in its establishment. Trend statements and citation threads were reviewed and arranged in a citation network. Trend statements were assessed according their degree of affirmation and spatial scale, and the appropriateness of the citations used to support statements was assessed. Analyses showed that 48.9% of publications misinterpreted the conclusions of cited sources, with a bias towards claiming jellyfish populations are increasing, with a single review having the most influence on the network. Collectively, these disparities resulted in a network based on unsubstantiated statements and citation threads. As a community, we must ensure our statements about scientific findings in general are accurately substantiated and carefully communicated such that incorrect perceptions, as in the case of jellyfish blooms, do not develop in the absence of rigorous testing. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Sanz-Martín M, Pitt KA, Condon RH, Lucas CH, Novaes de Santana C, et al. (2016) Flawed citation practices facilitate the unsubstantiated perception of a global trend toward increased jellyfish blooms. Global Ecology and Biogeography 25: 1039–1049. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/geb.12474.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
Global Ecology and Biogeography
Issue Date:
24-Jun-2016
DOI:
10.1111/geb.12474
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1466-822X
Sponsors:
National Science Foundation[OCE 1030149]; Fundación ‘La Caixa’
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSanz-Martín, Marinaen
dc.contributor.authorPitt, Kylie A.en
dc.contributor.authorCondon, Robert H.en
dc.contributor.authorLucas, Cathy H.en
dc.contributor.authorNovaes de Santana, Charlesen
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-03T13:24:32Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-03T13:24:32Z-
dc.date.issued2016-06-24en
dc.identifier.citationSanz-Martín M, Pitt KA, Condon RH, Lucas CH, Novaes de Santana C, et al. (2016) Flawed citation practices facilitate the unsubstantiated perception of a global trend toward increased jellyfish blooms. Global Ecology and Biogeography 25: 1039–1049. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/geb.12474.en
dc.identifier.issn1466-822Xen
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/geb.12474en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/621769-
dc.description.abstractSpeculation over a global rise in jellyfish populations has become widespread in the scientific literature, but until recently the purported ‘global increase’ had not been tested. Here we present a citation analysis of peer-reviewed literature to track the evolution of the current perception of increases in jellyfish and identify key papers involved in its establishment. Trend statements and citation threads were reviewed and arranged in a citation network. Trend statements were assessed according their degree of affirmation and spatial scale, and the appropriateness of the citations used to support statements was assessed. Analyses showed that 48.9% of publications misinterpreted the conclusions of cited sources, with a bias towards claiming jellyfish populations are increasing, with a single review having the most influence on the network. Collectively, these disparities resulted in a network based on unsubstantiated statements and citation threads. As a community, we must ensure our statements about scientific findings in general are accurately substantiated and carefully communicated such that incorrect perceptions, as in the case of jellyfish blooms, do not develop in the absence of rigorous testing. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltden
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation[OCE 1030149]en
dc.description.sponsorshipFundación ‘La Caixa’en
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.subjectCitationsen
dc.titleFlawed citation practices facilitate the unsubstantiated perception of a global trend toward increased jellyfish bloomsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalGlobal Ecology and Biogeographyen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Global Change Research; Instituto Mediterráneo de Estudios Avanzados IMEDEA (UIB-CSIC); Esporles Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionFacultad de Geología; Universitat de Barcelona; Barcelona 08028 Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionAustralian Rivers Institute and Griffith School of Environment, Griffith University; Gold Coast Campus Qld 4222 Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biology and Marine Biology; University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW); Wilmington NC 28403 USAen
dc.contributor.institutionNational Oceanography Centre Southampton (NOCS); University of Southampton; European Way Southampton SO14 3ZH UKen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zurich; Switzerlanden
kaust.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en
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