Lifecycle optimized ethanol-gasoline blends for turbocharged engines

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/621746
Title:
Lifecycle optimized ethanol-gasoline blends for turbocharged engines
Authors:
Zhang, Bo; Sarathy, Mani ( 0000-0002-3975-6206 )
Abstract:
This study presents a lifecycle (well-to-wheel) analysis to determine the CO2 emissions associated with ethanol blended gasoline in optimized turbocharged engines. This study provides a more accurate assessment on the best-achievable CO2 emission of ethanol blended gasoline mixtures in future engines. The optimal fuel blend (lowest CO2 emitting fuel) is identified. A range of gasoline fuels is studied, containing different ethanol volume percentages (E0–E40), research octane numbers (RON, 92–105), and octane sensitivities (8.5–15.5). Sugarcane-based and cellulosic ethanol-blended gasolines are shown to be effective in reducing lifecycle CO2 emission, while corn-based ethanol is not as effective. A refinery simulation of production emission was utilized, and combined with vehicle fuel consumption modeling to determine the lifecycle CO2 emissions associated with ethanol-blended gasoline in turbocharged engines. The critical parameters studied, and related to blended fuel lifecycle CO2 emissions, are ethanol content, research octane number, and octane sensitivity. The lowest-emitting blended fuel had an ethanol content of 32 vol%, RON of 105, and octane sensitivity of 15.5; resulting in a CO2 reduction of 7.1%, compared to the reference gasoline fuel and engine technology. The advantage of ethanol addition is greatest on a per unit basis at low concentrations. Finally, this study shows that engine-downsizing technology can yield an additional CO2 reduction of up to 25.5% in a two-stage downsized turbocharged engine burning the optimum sugarcane-based fuel blend. The social cost savings in the USA, from the CO2 reduction, is estimated to be as much as $187 billion/year. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd
KAUST Department:
Clean Combustion Research Center
Citation:
Zhang B, Sarathy SM (2016) Lifecycle optimized ethanol-gasoline blends for turbocharged engines. Applied Energy 181: 38–53. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.08.052.
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Applied Energy
Issue Date:
16-Aug-2016
DOI:
10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.08.052
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0306-2619
Sponsors:
King Abdullah University of Science and Technology; FUELCOM; CCRC’s Future Fuels
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Clean Combustion Research Center

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Boen
dc.contributor.authorSarathy, Manien
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-03T13:24:04Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-03T13:24:04Z-
dc.date.issued2016-08-16en
dc.identifier.citationZhang B, Sarathy SM (2016) Lifecycle optimized ethanol-gasoline blends for turbocharged engines. Applied Energy 181: 38–53. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.08.052.en
dc.identifier.issn0306-2619en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.08.052en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/621746-
dc.description.abstractThis study presents a lifecycle (well-to-wheel) analysis to determine the CO2 emissions associated with ethanol blended gasoline in optimized turbocharged engines. This study provides a more accurate assessment on the best-achievable CO2 emission of ethanol blended gasoline mixtures in future engines. The optimal fuel blend (lowest CO2 emitting fuel) is identified. A range of gasoline fuels is studied, containing different ethanol volume percentages (E0–E40), research octane numbers (RON, 92–105), and octane sensitivities (8.5–15.5). Sugarcane-based and cellulosic ethanol-blended gasolines are shown to be effective in reducing lifecycle CO2 emission, while corn-based ethanol is not as effective. A refinery simulation of production emission was utilized, and combined with vehicle fuel consumption modeling to determine the lifecycle CO2 emissions associated with ethanol-blended gasoline in turbocharged engines. The critical parameters studied, and related to blended fuel lifecycle CO2 emissions, are ethanol content, research octane number, and octane sensitivity. The lowest-emitting blended fuel had an ethanol content of 32 vol%, RON of 105, and octane sensitivity of 15.5; resulting in a CO2 reduction of 7.1%, compared to the reference gasoline fuel and engine technology. The advantage of ethanol addition is greatest on a per unit basis at low concentrations. Finally, this study shows that engine-downsizing technology can yield an additional CO2 reduction of up to 25.5% in a two-stage downsized turbocharged engine burning the optimum sugarcane-based fuel blend. The social cost savings in the USA, from the CO2 reduction, is estimated to be as much as $187 billion/year. © 2016 Elsevier Ltden
dc.description.sponsorshipKing Abdullah University of Science and Technologyen
dc.description.sponsorshipFUELCOMen
dc.description.sponsorshipCCRC’s Future Fuelsen
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.subjectCO emission 2en
dc.subjectEngine downsizingen
dc.subjectEthanol blended fuelen
dc.subjectLifecycle analysisen
dc.subjectTurbochargingen
dc.titleLifecycle optimized ethanol-gasoline blends for turbocharged enginesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentClean Combustion Research Centeren
dc.identifier.journalApplied Energyen
kaust.authorZhang, Boen
kaust.authorSarathy, Manien
All Items in KAUST are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.