Ongoing decline of shark populations in the Eastern Red Sea

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/621457
Title:
Ongoing decline of shark populations in the Eastern Red Sea
Authors:
Spät, Julia L.Y. ( 0000-0001-8703-1472 ) ; Nanninga, Gerrit B. ( 0000-0002-0134-1689 ) ; Berumen, Michael L. ( 0000-0003-2463-2742 )
Abstract:
Information on the abundance and diversity of Red Sea elasmobranchs is notoriously scarce, even though sharks are among the most profitable fisheries of the region. Effective conservation would ideally entail baselines on pristine conditions, yet no such data is available for the Red Sea. To collect distribution and abundance data on Red Sea elasmobranchs, we conducted a dedicated longline and Baited Remote Underwater Video system (BRUVs) sampling program along the entire Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia over the course of two years. Both survey techniques were opportunistically employed at central and southern Saudi Arabian (SA) Red Sea reef systems. In addition, BRUVs were employed in the northern SA Red Sea and at selected reef systems in Sudan. Shark catch per unit effort (CPUE) data for BRUVs and longline surveys were compared to published data from non-Red Sea reef systems. This comparison revealed CPUE estimates several orders of magnitude lower for both survey methods in the SA Red Sea compared to other reef systems around the world. Catch per unit effort values of BRUVs on Sudanese reefs on the contrary were within the range of estimates from various locations where sharks are considered common. We argue that decades of heavy fishing pressure on Red Sea marine resources has significantly altered the community structure of SA Red Sea reefs. There is an urgent need to establish effective management strategies for species of highest conservation concern. Our results have the potential to be used as a baseline, if such management strategies were to be established. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Spaet JLY, Nanninga GB, Berumen ML (2016) Ongoing decline of shark populations in the Eastern Red Sea. Biological Conservation 201: 20–28. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2016.06.018.
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Biological Conservation
Issue Date:
30-Jun-2016
DOI:
10.1016/j.biocon.2016.06.018
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0006-3207
Sponsors:
King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSpät, Julia L.Y.en
dc.contributor.authorNanninga, Gerrit B.en
dc.contributor.authorBerumen, Michael L.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-03T08:29:46Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-03T08:29:46Z-
dc.date.issued2016-06-30en
dc.identifier.citationSpaet JLY, Nanninga GB, Berumen ML (2016) Ongoing decline of shark populations in the Eastern Red Sea. Biological Conservation 201: 20–28. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2016.06.018.en
dc.identifier.issn0006-3207en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.biocon.2016.06.018en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/621457-
dc.description.abstractInformation on the abundance and diversity of Red Sea elasmobranchs is notoriously scarce, even though sharks are among the most profitable fisheries of the region. Effective conservation would ideally entail baselines on pristine conditions, yet no such data is available for the Red Sea. To collect distribution and abundance data on Red Sea elasmobranchs, we conducted a dedicated longline and Baited Remote Underwater Video system (BRUVs) sampling program along the entire Red Sea coast of Saudi Arabia over the course of two years. Both survey techniques were opportunistically employed at central and southern Saudi Arabian (SA) Red Sea reef systems. In addition, BRUVs were employed in the northern SA Red Sea and at selected reef systems in Sudan. Shark catch per unit effort (CPUE) data for BRUVs and longline surveys were compared to published data from non-Red Sea reef systems. This comparison revealed CPUE estimates several orders of magnitude lower for both survey methods in the SA Red Sea compared to other reef systems around the world. Catch per unit effort values of BRUVs on Sudanese reefs on the contrary were within the range of estimates from various locations where sharks are considered common. We argue that decades of heavy fishing pressure on Red Sea marine resources has significantly altered the community structure of SA Red Sea reefs. There is an urgent need to establish effective management strategies for species of highest conservation concern. Our results have the potential to be used as a baseline, if such management strategies were to be established. © 2016 Elsevier Ltden
dc.description.sponsorshipKing Abdullah University of Science and Technologyen
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.subjectBaited Remote Underwater Video system (BRUVs)en
dc.titleOngoing decline of shark populations in the Eastern Red Seaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalBiological Conservationen
kaust.authorSpät, Julia L.Y.en
kaust.authorNanninga, Gerrit B.en
kaust.authorBerumen, Michael L.en
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