A bridge too far: dispersal barriers and cryptic speciation in an Arabian Peninsula grouper (Cephalopholis hemistiktos)

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/621449
Title:
A bridge too far: dispersal barriers and cryptic speciation in an Arabian Peninsula grouper (Cephalopholis hemistiktos)
Authors:
Priest, Mark; DiBattista, Joseph ( 0000-0002-5696-7574 ) ; McIlwain, Jennifer L.; Taylor, Brett M.; Hussey, Nigel E.; Berumen, Michael L. ( 0000-0003-2463-2742 )
Abstract:
Aim: We use genetic and age-based analyses to assess the evidence for a biogeographical barrier to larval dispersal in the yellowfin hind, Cephalopholis hemistiktos, a commercially important species found across the Arabian Peninsula. Location: Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Gulf of Oman and Arabian Gulf. Methods: Mitochondrial DNA cytochrome-c oxidase subunit-I and nuclear DNA (S7) sequences were obtained for C. hemistiktos sampled throughout its distributional range. Phylogeographical and population-level analyses were used to assess patterns of genetic structure and to identify barriers to dispersal. Concurrently, age-based demographic analyses using otoliths determined differences in growth and longevity between regions. Results: Our analyses revealed significant genetic structure congruent with growth parameter differences observed across sampling sites, suggesting cryptic speciation between populations in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden versus the Gulf of Oman and Arabian Gulf. Coalescence analyses indicated these two regions have been isolated for > 800,000 years. Main conclusions: Our results indicate historical disruption to gene flow and a contemporary dispersal barrier in the Arabian Sea, which C. hemistiktos larvae are unable to effectively traverse. This provides yet another example of a (cryptic) species with high dispersive potential whose range is delimited by a lack of suitable habitat between locations or an inability to successfully recruit at the range edge. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Priest MA, DiBattista JD, McIlwain JL, Taylor BM, Hussey NE, et al. (2015) A bridge too far: dispersal barriers and cryptic speciation in an Arabian Peninsula grouper (Cephalopholis hemistiktos). J Biogeogr 43: 820–832. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jbi.12681.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
Journal of Biogeography
Issue Date:
12-Dec-2015
DOI:
10.1111/jbi.12681
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0305-0270
Sponsors:
This research was supported by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Office of Competitive Research Funds under award No. CRG-1-2012-BER-002 and baseline research funds to M.L.B., as well as National Geographic Society Grant 9024-11 to J.D.D. For support during sample collection trips we thank the KAUST Coastal and Marine Resources Core Lab, Amr Gusti, and Eric Mason at Dream Diver in KSA; the crew of the M/V Deli in Djibouti; the Wildlife Conservation General Administration of Sudan, Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries in Oman, including Abdul Kareem; the Red Sea State Government and The Red Sea University in Port Sudan, as well as Equipe Cousteau support for the Sudan Shark and Ray Conservation and Management Program including Steven Kessel, Claudio Scarpellini and Mohammed Younis. We are grateful to a crack team of sharpshooters for help with fish collections, including: Brian Bowen, Camrin Braun, Howard Choat, Richard Coleman, JP Hobbs, Gerrit Nanninga, Luiz Rocha, Tane Sinclair-Taylor and members of the Reef Ecology Lab at KAUST. Finally, we thank the KAUST Bioscience Core Laboratory for assistance with DNA sequencing.
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jbi.12681/full
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Environmental Science and Engineering Program; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPriest, Marken
dc.contributor.authorDiBattista, Josephen
dc.contributor.authorMcIlwain, Jennifer L.en
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Brett M.en
dc.contributor.authorHussey, Nigel E.en
dc.contributor.authorBerumen, Michael L.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-03T08:29:35Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-03T08:29:35Z-
dc.date.issued2015-12-12en
dc.identifier.citationPriest MA, DiBattista JD, McIlwain JL, Taylor BM, Hussey NE, et al. (2015) A bridge too far: dispersal barriers and cryptic speciation in an Arabian Peninsula grouper (Cephalopholis hemistiktos). J Biogeogr 43: 820–832. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jbi.12681.en
dc.identifier.issn0305-0270en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jbi.12681en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/621449-
dc.description.abstractAim: We use genetic and age-based analyses to assess the evidence for a biogeographical barrier to larval dispersal in the yellowfin hind, Cephalopholis hemistiktos, a commercially important species found across the Arabian Peninsula. Location: Red Sea, Gulf of Aden, Gulf of Oman and Arabian Gulf. Methods: Mitochondrial DNA cytochrome-c oxidase subunit-I and nuclear DNA (S7) sequences were obtained for C. hemistiktos sampled throughout its distributional range. Phylogeographical and population-level analyses were used to assess patterns of genetic structure and to identify barriers to dispersal. Concurrently, age-based demographic analyses using otoliths determined differences in growth and longevity between regions. Results: Our analyses revealed significant genetic structure congruent with growth parameter differences observed across sampling sites, suggesting cryptic speciation between populations in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden versus the Gulf of Oman and Arabian Gulf. Coalescence analyses indicated these two regions have been isolated for > 800,000 years. Main conclusions: Our results indicate historical disruption to gene flow and a contemporary dispersal barrier in the Arabian Sea, which C. hemistiktos larvae are unable to effectively traverse. This provides yet another example of a (cryptic) species with high dispersive potential whose range is delimited by a lack of suitable habitat between locations or an inability to successfully recruit at the range edge. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Office of Competitive Research Funds under award No. CRG-1-2012-BER-002 and baseline research funds to M.L.B., as well as National Geographic Society Grant 9024-11 to J.D.D. For support during sample collection trips we thank the KAUST Coastal and Marine Resources Core Lab, Amr Gusti, and Eric Mason at Dream Diver in KSA; the crew of the M/V Deli in Djibouti; the Wildlife Conservation General Administration of Sudan, Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries in Oman, including Abdul Kareem; the Red Sea State Government and The Red Sea University in Port Sudan, as well as Equipe Cousteau support for the Sudan Shark and Ray Conservation and Management Program including Steven Kessel, Claudio Scarpellini and Mohammed Younis. We are grateful to a crack team of sharpshooters for help with fish collections, including: Brian Bowen, Camrin Braun, Howard Choat, Richard Coleman, JP Hobbs, Gerrit Nanninga, Luiz Rocha, Tane Sinclair-Taylor and members of the Reef Ecology Lab at KAUST. Finally, we thank the KAUST Bioscience Core Laboratory for assistance with DNA sequencing.en
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jbi.12681/fullen
dc.subjectCoral reef fishen
dc.subjectDemographyen
dc.subjectMitochondrial DNAen
dc.subjectNuclear DNAen
dc.subjectPhylogeographyen
dc.subjectPopulation geneticsen
dc.subjectSerranidaeen
dc.titleA bridge too far: dispersal barriers and cryptic speciation in an Arabian Peninsula grouper (Cephalopholis hemistiktos)en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentEnvironmental Science and Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Biogeographyen
dc.contributor.institutionMarine Spatial Ecology Lab; School of Biological Sciences; University of Queensland; St Lucia QLD 4072 Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Environment and Agriculture; Curtin University; Perth WA 6845 Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionCollege of Marine and Environmental Science; James Cook University; Townsville QLD 4811 Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionGreat Lakes Institute for Environmental Research; University of Windsor; Windsor ON N9B 3P4 Canadaen
kaust.authorPriest, Marken
kaust.authorDiBattista, Josephen
kaust.authorBerumen, Michael L.en
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