Olfactory attraction of Drosophila suzukii by symbiotic acetic acid bacteria

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/621437
Title:
Olfactory attraction of Drosophila suzukii by symbiotic acetic acid bacteria
Authors:
Mazzetto, Fabio; Gonella, Elena; Crotti, Elena; Vacchini, Violetta; Syrpas, Michail; Pontini, Marianna; Mangelinckx, Sven; Daffonchio, Daniele ( 0000-0003-0947-925X ) ; Alma, Alberto
Abstract:
Some species of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) play relevant roles in the metabolism and physiology of Drosophila spp. and in some cases convey benefits to their hosts. The pest Drosophila suzukii harbors a set of AAB similar to those of other Drosophila species. Here, we investigate the potential to exploit the ability of AAB to produce volatile substances that attract female D. suzukii. Using a two-way olfactometer bioassay, we investigate the preference of D. suzukii for strains of AAB, and using solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography–mass spectrometry we specifically characterize their volatile profiles to identify attractive and non-attractive components produced by strains from the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter, and Komagataeibacter. Flies had a preference for one strain of Komagataeibacter and two strains of Gluconobacter. Analyses of the volatile profiles from the preferred Gluconobacter isolates found that acetic acid is distinctively emitted even after 2 days of bacterial growth, confirming the relevance of this volatile in the profile of this isolate for attracting flies. Analyses of the volatile profile from the preferred Komagataeibacter isolate showed that a different volatile in its profile could be responsible for attracting D. suzukii. Moreover, variation in the concentration of butyric acid derivatives found in some strains may influence the preference of D. suzukii. Our results indicate that Gluconobacter and Komagataeibacter strains isolated from D. suzukii have the potential to provide substances that could be exploited to develop sustainable mass-trapping-based control approaches. © 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
Citation:
Mazzetto F, Gonella E, Crotti E, Vacchini V, Syrpas M, et al. (2016) Olfactory attraction of Drosophila suzukii by symbiotic acetic acid bacteria. Journal of Pest Science 89: 783–792. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10340-016-0754-7.
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Journal of Pest Science
Issue Date:
24-Mar-2016
DOI:
10.1007/s10340-016-0754-7
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1612-4758; 1612-4766
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMazzetto, Fabioen
dc.contributor.authorGonella, Elenaen
dc.contributor.authorCrotti, Elenaen
dc.contributor.authorVacchini, Violettaen
dc.contributor.authorSyrpas, Michailen
dc.contributor.authorPontini, Mariannaen
dc.contributor.authorMangelinckx, Svenen
dc.contributor.authorDaffonchio, Danieleen
dc.contributor.authorAlma, Albertoen
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-03T08:29:18Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-03T08:29:18Z-
dc.date.issued2016-03-24en
dc.identifier.citationMazzetto F, Gonella E, Crotti E, Vacchini V, Syrpas M, et al. (2016) Olfactory attraction of Drosophila suzukii by symbiotic acetic acid bacteria. Journal of Pest Science 89: 783–792. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10340-016-0754-7.en
dc.identifier.issn1612-4758en
dc.identifier.issn1612-4766en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10340-016-0754-7en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/621437-
dc.description.abstractSome species of acetic acid bacteria (AAB) play relevant roles in the metabolism and physiology of Drosophila spp. and in some cases convey benefits to their hosts. The pest Drosophila suzukii harbors a set of AAB similar to those of other Drosophila species. Here, we investigate the potential to exploit the ability of AAB to produce volatile substances that attract female D. suzukii. Using a two-way olfactometer bioassay, we investigate the preference of D. suzukii for strains of AAB, and using solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography–mass spectrometry we specifically characterize their volatile profiles to identify attractive and non-attractive components produced by strains from the genera Acetobacter, Gluconobacter, and Komagataeibacter. Flies had a preference for one strain of Komagataeibacter and two strains of Gluconobacter. Analyses of the volatile profiles from the preferred Gluconobacter isolates found that acetic acid is distinctively emitted even after 2 days of bacterial growth, confirming the relevance of this volatile in the profile of this isolate for attracting flies. Analyses of the volatile profile from the preferred Komagataeibacter isolate showed that a different volatile in its profile could be responsible for attracting D. suzukii. Moreover, variation in the concentration of butyric acid derivatives found in some strains may influence the preference of D. suzukii. Our results indicate that Gluconobacter and Komagataeibacter strains isolated from D. suzukii have the potential to provide substances that could be exploited to develop sustainable mass-trapping-based control approaches. © 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelbergen
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.subjectGluconobacteren
dc.subjectInsect symbiontsen
dc.subjectKomagataeibacteren
dc.subjectOlfactometer bioassaysen
dc.subjectSpotted-wing drosophilaen
dc.subjectVolatile profile analysisen
dc.titleOlfactory attraction of Drosophila suzukii by symbiotic acetic acid bacteriaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Pest Scienceen
dc.contributor.institutionDipartimento di Scienze Agrarie, Forestali e Alimentari (DISAFA), Università degli Studi di Torino, Largo P. Braccini 2, Grugliasco, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionDipartimento di Scienze per gli Alimenti, la Nutrizione e l’Ambiente (DeFENS), Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 2, Milan, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, Ghent University, Coupure links 653, Ghent, Belgiumen
kaust.authorDaffonchio, Danieleen
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