Drivers of Global Vegetation Biomass Trends between 1988 and 2008

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/621035
Title:
Drivers of Global Vegetation Biomass Trends between 1988 and 2008
Authors:
McCabe, Matthew ( 0000-0002-1279-5272 ) ; Liu, Yi; Evans, Jason; De Jeu, Richard; van Dijk, Albert
Abstract:
Vegetation optical depth (VOD) is an indicator of the vegetation water content of both woody and leaf components in terrestrial biomass as derived from passive microwave observations. VOD is distinctly different from products derived from optical remote sensing: it is less prone to saturation in dense canopy; is sensitive to both photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic biomass; is less affected by atmospheric conditions; and is of coarser spatial resolution. Here, VOD retrievals from a series of sensors are blended to produce a time series from 1988 through to 2008, and a global analysis is undertaken to quantify and attribute global VOD trends over the same period. We conduct Mann-Kendall linear trend tests on annual average VOD to identify regions of significant change. Patterns for these regions were evaluated against independent datasets to diagnose the underlying cause of the observed trends. Results indicate that: (1) over grassland and shrubland, VOD patterns correspond strongly to temporal precipitation patterns; (2) over croplands, annual average VOD shows a general increase that corresponds to reported crop yield patterns and can be attributed to a combination of precipitation patterns and agricultural improvement; (3) over humid tropical forest, the spatial pattern of VOD decline agrees well with deforestation patterns identified in previous studies; and (4) over boreal forests, regional VOD declines can be attributed to a combination of fires and logging. We conclude that VOD can be used to estimate and interpret global changes in total above ground vegetation biomass. We expect that this new observationally based remote sensing data source will be of considerable interest to hydrological, agricultural, climate change and carbon cycle studies, and provide new insights into these and related process investigations.
KAUST Department:
BESE
Conference/Event name:
American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting 2013
Issue Date:
Dec-2013
Type:
Poster
Additional Links:
http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.B43C0489L
Appears in Collections:
Posters

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcCabe, Matthewen
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Yien
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Jasonen
dc.contributor.authorDe Jeu, Richarden
dc.contributor.authorvan Dijk, Alberten
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-16T06:14:02Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-16T06:14:02Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/621035-
dc.description.abstractVegetation optical depth (VOD) is an indicator of the vegetation water content of both woody and leaf components in terrestrial biomass as derived from passive microwave observations. VOD is distinctly different from products derived from optical remote sensing: it is less prone to saturation in dense canopy; is sensitive to both photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic biomass; is less affected by atmospheric conditions; and is of coarser spatial resolution. Here, VOD retrievals from a series of sensors are blended to produce a time series from 1988 through to 2008, and a global analysis is undertaken to quantify and attribute global VOD trends over the same period. We conduct Mann-Kendall linear trend tests on annual average VOD to identify regions of significant change. Patterns for these regions were evaluated against independent datasets to diagnose the underlying cause of the observed trends. Results indicate that: (1) over grassland and shrubland, VOD patterns correspond strongly to temporal precipitation patterns; (2) over croplands, annual average VOD shows a general increase that corresponds to reported crop yield patterns and can be attributed to a combination of precipitation patterns and agricultural improvement; (3) over humid tropical forest, the spatial pattern of VOD decline agrees well with deforestation patterns identified in previous studies; and (4) over boreal forests, regional VOD declines can be attributed to a combination of fires and logging. We conclude that VOD can be used to estimate and interpret global changes in total above ground vegetation biomass. We expect that this new observationally based remote sensing data source will be of considerable interest to hydrological, agricultural, climate change and carbon cycle studies, and provide new insights into these and related process investigations.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AGUFM.B43C0489Len
dc.subject0480 BIOGEOSCIENCES Remote sensingen
dc.subject0476 BIOGEOSCIENCES Plant ecologyen
dc.titleDrivers of Global Vegetation Biomass Trends between 1988 and 2008en
dc.typePosteren
dc.contributor.departmentBESEen
dc.conference.date12/2013en
dc.conference.nameAmerican Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting 2013en
dc.contributor.institutionThe University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionVU University Amsterdam, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionThe Australian National Universityen
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