Leaf chlorophyll constraint on model simulated gross primary productivity in agricultural systems

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/620915
Title:
Leaf chlorophyll constraint on model simulated gross primary productivity in agricultural systems
Authors:
Houborg, Rasmus; McCabe, Matthew ( 0000-0002-1279-5272 ) ; Cescatti, Alessandro; Gitelson, Anatoly A.
Abstract:
Leaf chlorophyll content (Chll) may serve as an observational proxy for the maximum rate of carboxylation (Vmax), which describes leaf photosynthetic capacity and represents the single most important control on modeled leaf photosynthesis within most Terrestrial Biosphere Models (TBMs). The parameterization of Vmax is associated with great uncertainty as it can vary significantly between plants and in response to changes in leaf nitrogen (N) availability, plant phenology and environmental conditions. Houborg et al. (2013) outlined a semi-mechanistic relationship between V max 25 (Vmax normalized to 25 °C) and Chll based on inter-linkages between V max 25 , Rubisco enzyme kinetics, N and Chll. Here, these relationships are parameterized for a wider range of important agricultural crops and embedded within the leaf photosynthesis-conductance scheme of the Community Land Model (CLM), bypassing the questionable use of temporally invariant and broadly defined plant functional type (PFT) specific V max 25 values. In this study, the new Chll constrained version of CLM is refined with an updated parameterization scheme for specific application to soybean and maize. The benefit of using in-situ measured and satellite retrieved Chll for constraining model simulations of Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) is evaluated over fields in central Nebraska, U.S.A between 2001 and 2005. Landsat-based Chll time-series records derived from the Regularized Canopy Reflectance model (REGFLEC) are used as forcing to the CLM. Validation of simulated GPP against 15 site-years of flux tower observations demonstrate the utility of Chll as a model constraint, with the coefficient of efficiency increasing from 0.91 to 0.94 and from 0.87 to 0.91 for maize and soybean, respectively. Model performances particularly improve during the late reproductive and senescence stage, where the largest temporal variations in Chll (averaging 35–55 μg cm−2 for maize and 20–35 μg cm−2 for soybean) are observed. While prolonged periods of vegetation stress did not occur over the studied fields, given the usefulness of Chll as an indicator of plant health, enhanced GPP predictabilities should be expected in fields exposed to longer periods of moisture and nutrient stress. While the results support the use of Chll as an observational proxy for V max 25 , future work needs to be directed towards improving the Chll retrieval accuracy from space observations and developing consistent and physically realistic modeling schemes that can be parameterized with acceptable accuracy over spatial and temporal domains.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination & Reuse Research Cntr; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
Citation:
Rasmus Houborg, Matthew F. McCabe, Alessandro Cescatti, Anatoly A. Gitelson, Leaf chlorophyll constraint on model simulated gross primary productivity in agricultural systems, International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation, Volume 43, December 2015, Pages 160-176, ISSN 0303-2434, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jag.2015.03.016
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation
Issue Date:
5-May-2015
DOI:
10.1016/j.jag.2015.03.016
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0303-2434
Sponsors:
The research undertaken here was funded by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). We appreciate the data provided by the Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies (CALMIT) and the Carbon Sequestration Program, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. This work was supported in part by International Incoming Marie Curie fellowship to Anatoly Gitelson. This work used eddy covariance data acquired by the FLUXNET community and in particular by the following networks: AmeriFlux (U.S. Department of Energy, Biological and Environmental Research, Terrestrial Carbon Program (DE‐FG02‐04ER63917 and DE‐FG02‐04ER63911)), AfriFlux, AsiaFlux, CarboAfrica, CarboEuropeIP, CarboItaly, CarboMont, ChinaFlux, Fluxnet‐Canada (supported by CFCAS, NSERC, BIOCAP, Environment Canada, and NRCan), GreenGrass, KoFlux, LBA, NECC, OzFlux, TCOS‐Siberia, USCCC. We acknowledge the financial support to the eddy covariance data harmonization provided by CarboEuropeIP, FAO, GTOS, TCO, iLEAPS, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, National Science Foundation, University of Tuscia, Université Laval and Environment Canada and US Department of Energy and the database development and technical support from Berkeley Water Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Microsoft Research eScience, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley and the University of Virginia.
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0303243415000707
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHouborg, Rasmusen
dc.contributor.authorMcCabe, Matthewen
dc.contributor.authorCescatti, Alessandroen
dc.contributor.authorGitelson, Anatoly A.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-11T13:06:46Z-
dc.date.available2016-10-11T13:06:46Z-
dc.date.issued2015-05-05-
dc.identifier.citationRasmus Houborg, Matthew F. McCabe, Alessandro Cescatti, Anatoly A. Gitelson, Leaf chlorophyll constraint on model simulated gross primary productivity in agricultural systems, International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation, Volume 43, December 2015, Pages 160-176, ISSN 0303-2434, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jag.2015.03.016en
dc.identifier.issn0303-2434-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jag.2015.03.016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/620915-
dc.description.abstractLeaf chlorophyll content (Chll) may serve as an observational proxy for the maximum rate of carboxylation (Vmax), which describes leaf photosynthetic capacity and represents the single most important control on modeled leaf photosynthesis within most Terrestrial Biosphere Models (TBMs). The parameterization of Vmax is associated with great uncertainty as it can vary significantly between plants and in response to changes in leaf nitrogen (N) availability, plant phenology and environmental conditions. Houborg et al. (2013) outlined a semi-mechanistic relationship between V max 25 (Vmax normalized to 25 °C) and Chll based on inter-linkages between V max 25 , Rubisco enzyme kinetics, N and Chll. Here, these relationships are parameterized for a wider range of important agricultural crops and embedded within the leaf photosynthesis-conductance scheme of the Community Land Model (CLM), bypassing the questionable use of temporally invariant and broadly defined plant functional type (PFT) specific V max 25 values. In this study, the new Chll constrained version of CLM is refined with an updated parameterization scheme for specific application to soybean and maize. The benefit of using in-situ measured and satellite retrieved Chll for constraining model simulations of Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) is evaluated over fields in central Nebraska, U.S.A between 2001 and 2005. Landsat-based Chll time-series records derived from the Regularized Canopy Reflectance model (REGFLEC) are used as forcing to the CLM. Validation of simulated GPP against 15 site-years of flux tower observations demonstrate the utility of Chll as a model constraint, with the coefficient of efficiency increasing from 0.91 to 0.94 and from 0.87 to 0.91 for maize and soybean, respectively. Model performances particularly improve during the late reproductive and senescence stage, where the largest temporal variations in Chll (averaging 35–55 μg cm−2 for maize and 20–35 μg cm−2 for soybean) are observed. While prolonged periods of vegetation stress did not occur over the studied fields, given the usefulness of Chll as an indicator of plant health, enhanced GPP predictabilities should be expected in fields exposed to longer periods of moisture and nutrient stress. While the results support the use of Chll as an observational proxy for V max 25 , future work needs to be directed towards improving the Chll retrieval accuracy from space observations and developing consistent and physically realistic modeling schemes that can be parameterized with acceptable accuracy over spatial and temporal domains.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe research undertaken here was funded by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST). We appreciate the data provided by the Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies (CALMIT) and the Carbon Sequestration Program, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. This work was supported in part by International Incoming Marie Curie fellowship to Anatoly Gitelson. This work used eddy covariance data acquired by the FLUXNET community and in particular by the following networks: AmeriFlux (U.S. Department of Energy, Biological and Environmental Research, Terrestrial Carbon Program (DE‐FG02‐04ER63917 and DE‐FG02‐04ER63911)), AfriFlux, AsiaFlux, CarboAfrica, CarboEuropeIP, CarboItaly, CarboMont, ChinaFlux, Fluxnet‐Canada (supported by CFCAS, NSERC, BIOCAP, Environment Canada, and NRCan), GreenGrass, KoFlux, LBA, NECC, OzFlux, TCOS‐Siberia, USCCC. We acknowledge the financial support to the eddy covariance data harmonization provided by CarboEuropeIP, FAO, GTOS, TCO, iLEAPS, Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry, National Science Foundation, University of Tuscia, Université Laval and Environment Canada and US Department of Energy and the database development and technical support from Berkeley Water Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Microsoft Research eScience, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley and the University of Virginia.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0303243415000707en
dc.rights© <2015>. This manuscript version is made available under the CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectLandsaten
dc.subjectLeaf chlorophyll contenten
dc.subjectVmaxen
dc.subjectLeaf photosynthetic capacityen
dc.subjectCommunity Land Modelen
dc.subjectAgricultureen
dc.subjectRubiscoen
dc.subjectNitrogenen
dc.titleLeaf chlorophyll constraint on model simulated gross primary productivity in agricultural systemsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination & Reuse Research Cntren
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformationen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionEuropean Commission, Joint Research Centre, IES, Ispra, Italyen
dc.contributor.institutionCenter for Advanced Land Management Information Technology (CALMIT), School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, USAen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorHouborg, Rasmusen
kaust.authorMcCabe, Matthewen
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