The genetics of an early Neolithic pastoralist from the Zagros, Iran

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/619762
Title:
The genetics of an early Neolithic pastoralist from the Zagros, Iran
Authors:
Gallego Llorente, Marcos ( 0000-0003-3498-6018 ) ; Connell, Sarah; Jones, Eppie R; Merrett, Deborah; Jeon, Jeonsu; Eriksson, Anders ( 0000-0003-3436-3726 ) ; Siska, Veronika; Gamba, Cristina; Meiklejohn, Chris; Beyer, Robert; Jeon, Sungwon; Cho, Yung Sung; Hofreiter, Michael; Bhak, Jong; Manica, Andrea; Pinhasi, Ron
Abstract:
The agricultural transition profoundly changed human societies. We sequenced and analysed the first genome (1.39x) of an early Neolithic woman from Ganj Dareh, in the Zagros Mountains of Iran, a site with early evidence for an economy based on goat herding,ca. 10,000 BP. We show that Western Iran was inhabited by a population genetically most similar to hunter-gatherers from the Caucasus, but distinct from the Neolithic Anatolian people who later brought food production into Europe. The inhabitants of Ganj Dareh made little direct genetic contribution to modern European populations, suggesting they were somewhat isolated from other populations in the region. Runs of homozygosity are of a similar length to those from Neolithic Anatolians, and shorter than those of Caucasus and Western Hunter-Gatherers, suggesting that the inhabitants of Ganj Dareh did not undergo the large population bottleneck suffered by their northern neighbours. While some degree of cultural diffusion between Anatolia, Western Iran and other neighbouring regions is possible, the genetic dissimilarity of early Anatolian farmers and the inhabitants of Ganj Dareh supports a model in which Neolithic societies in these areas were distinct.
KAUST Department:
Integrative Systems Biology Lab; Biological and Environmental Sciences & Engineering Division (BESE)
Publisher:
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
Issue Date:
18-Jun-2016
DOI:
10.1101/059568
Type:
Article
Sponsors:
A.M. was supported by ERC Consolidator Grant 647787 ‘LocalAdaptation’; R.P. by ERC Starting Grant: ERC-2010-StG 26344; M.H. by ERC Consolidator Grant 310763 ‘GeneFlow’; C.G. was supported by the Irish Research Council for Humanities and Social Sciences (IRCHSS) ERC Support Programme and the Marie-Curie Intra-European Fellowships (FP7-IEF-328024); J.B. was supported by the 2014 Research fund (1.140077.01) of Ulsan National Institute of Science & Technology (UNIST). And Geromics internal research funding; and M.G. by a BBSRC DTP studentship.
Additional Links:
http://biorxiv.org/content/early/2016/06/18/059568
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Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGallego Llorente, Marcosen
dc.contributor.authorConnell, Sarahen
dc.contributor.authorJones, Eppie Ren
dc.contributor.authorMerrett, Deborahen
dc.contributor.authorJeon, Jeonsuen
dc.contributor.authorEriksson, Andersen
dc.contributor.authorSiska, Veronikaen
dc.contributor.authorGamba, Cristinaen
dc.contributor.authorMeiklejohn, Chrisen
dc.contributor.authorBeyer, Roberten
dc.contributor.authorJeon, Sungwonen
dc.contributor.authorCho, Yung Sungen
dc.contributor.authorHofreiter, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorBhak, Jongen
dc.contributor.authorManica, Andreaen
dc.contributor.authorPinhasi, Ronen
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-04T07:29:40Z-
dc.date.available2016-09-04T07:29:40Z-
dc.date.issued2016-06-18-
dc.identifier.doi10.1101/059568-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/619762-
dc.description.abstractThe agricultural transition profoundly changed human societies. We sequenced and analysed the first genome (1.39x) of an early Neolithic woman from Ganj Dareh, in the Zagros Mountains of Iran, a site with early evidence for an economy based on goat herding,ca. 10,000 BP. We show that Western Iran was inhabited by a population genetically most similar to hunter-gatherers from the Caucasus, but distinct from the Neolithic Anatolian people who later brought food production into Europe. The inhabitants of Ganj Dareh made little direct genetic contribution to modern European populations, suggesting they were somewhat isolated from other populations in the region. Runs of homozygosity are of a similar length to those from Neolithic Anatolians, and shorter than those of Caucasus and Western Hunter-Gatherers, suggesting that the inhabitants of Ganj Dareh did not undergo the large population bottleneck suffered by their northern neighbours. While some degree of cultural diffusion between Anatolia, Western Iran and other neighbouring regions is possible, the genetic dissimilarity of early Anatolian farmers and the inhabitants of Ganj Dareh supports a model in which Neolithic societies in these areas were distinct.en
dc.description.sponsorshipA.M. was supported by ERC Consolidator Grant 647787 ‘LocalAdaptation’; R.P. by ERC Starting Grant: ERC-2010-StG 26344; M.H. by ERC Consolidator Grant 310763 ‘GeneFlow’; C.G. was supported by the Irish Research Council for Humanities and Social Sciences (IRCHSS) ERC Support Programme and the Marie-Curie Intra-European Fellowships (FP7-IEF-328024); J.B. was supported by the 2014 Research fund (1.140077.01) of Ulsan National Institute of Science & Technology (UNIST). And Geromics internal research funding; and M.G. by a BBSRC DTP studentship.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCold Spring Harbor Laboratory Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://biorxiv.org/content/early/2016/06/18/059568en
dc.rightsThe copyright holder for this preprint is the author/funder. It is made available under a CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0 International license. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.titleThe genetics of an early Neolithic pastoralist from the Zagros, Iranen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentIntegrative Systems Biology Laben
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences & Engineering Division (BESE)en
dc.eprint.versionPre-printen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 3EJ, UK.en
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Archaeology and Earth Institute, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland.en
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Archaeology, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada, V5A 1S6.en
dc.contributor.institutionThe Genomics Institute, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 44919, Republic of Korea.en
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 44919, Republic of Korea.en
dc.contributor.institutionSmurfit Institute of Genetics, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland.en
dc.contributor.institutionCentre for GeoGenetics, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Øster Voldgade 5-7, Copenhagen 1350, Denmark.en
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Anthropology, University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, MB, Canada, R3B 2E9.en
dc.contributor.institutionEvolutionary Adaptive Genomics, Institute for Biochemistry and Biology, Department of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Potsdam, Karl-Liebknechtstraße 24-25, 14476 Potsdam, Germany.en
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorEriksson, Andersen
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