CMOS technology: a critical enabler for free-form electronics-based killer applications

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/618216
Title:
CMOS technology: a critical enabler for free-form electronics-based killer applications
Authors:
Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa ( 0000-0003-3279-0441 ) ; Hussain, Aftab M. ( 0000-0002-9516-9428 ) ; Hanna, Amir ( 0000-0003-4679-366X )
Abstract:
Complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology offers batch manufacturability by ultra-large-scaleintegration (ULSI) of high performance electronics with a performance/cost advantage and profound reliability. However, as of today their focus has been on rigid and bulky thin film based materials. Their applications have been limited to computation, communication, display and vehicular electronics. With the upcoming surge of Internet of Everything, we have critical opportunity to expand the world of electronics by bridging between CMOS technology and free form electronics which can be used as wearable, implantable and embedded form. The asymmetry of shape and softness of surface (skins) in natural living objects including human, other species, plants make them incompatible with the presently available uniformly shaped and rigidly structured today’s CMOS electronics. But if we can break this barrier then we can use the physically free form electronics for applications like plant monitoring for expansion of agricultural productivity and quality, we can find monitoring and treatment focused consumer healthcare electronics – and many more creative applications. In our view, the fundamental challenge is to engage the mass users to materialize their creative ideas. Present form of electronics are too complex to understand, to work with and to use. By deploying game changing additive manufacturing, low-cost raw materials, transfer printing along with CMOS technology, we can potentially stick high quality CMOS electronics on any existing objects and embed such electronics into any future objects that will be made. The end goal is to make them smart to augment the quality of our life. We use a particular example on implantable electronics (brain machine interface) and its integration strategy enabled by CMOS device design and technology run path. © (2016) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.
KAUST Department:
Electrical Engineering Program; Materials Science and Engineering (MSE)
Citation:
Muhammad M. Hussain ; Aftab M. Hussain and Amir Hanna " CMOS technology: a critical enabler for free-form electronics-based killer applications ", Proc. SPIE 9836, Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII, 983617 (May 17, 2016); doi:10.1117/12.2222972; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.2222972
Journal:
Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII
Conference/Event name:
Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII
Issue Date:
17-May-2016
DOI:
10.1117/12.2222972
Type:
Conference Paper
Additional Links:
http://proceedings.spiedigitallibrary.org/proceeding.aspx?doi=10.1117/12.2222972
Appears in Collections:
Conference Papers

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHussain, Muhammad Mustafaen
dc.contributor.authorHussain, Aftab M.en
dc.contributor.authorHanna, Amiren
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-10T12:26:33Z-
dc.date.available2016-08-10T12:26:33Z-
dc.date.issued2016-05-17-
dc.identifier.citationMuhammad M. Hussain ; Aftab M. Hussain and Amir Hanna " CMOS technology: a critical enabler for free-form electronics-based killer applications ", Proc. SPIE 9836, Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIII, 983617 (May 17, 2016); doi:10.1117/12.2222972; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.2222972en
dc.identifier.doi10.1117/12.2222972-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/618216-
dc.description.abstractComplementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology offers batch manufacturability by ultra-large-scaleintegration (ULSI) of high performance electronics with a performance/cost advantage and profound reliability. However, as of today their focus has been on rigid and bulky thin film based materials. Their applications have been limited to computation, communication, display and vehicular electronics. With the upcoming surge of Internet of Everything, we have critical opportunity to expand the world of electronics by bridging between CMOS technology and free form electronics which can be used as wearable, implantable and embedded form. The asymmetry of shape and softness of surface (skins) in natural living objects including human, other species, plants make them incompatible with the presently available uniformly shaped and rigidly structured today’s CMOS electronics. But if we can break this barrier then we can use the physically free form electronics for applications like plant monitoring for expansion of agricultural productivity and quality, we can find monitoring and treatment focused consumer healthcare electronics – and many more creative applications. In our view, the fundamental challenge is to engage the mass users to materialize their creative ideas. Present form of electronics are too complex to understand, to work with and to use. By deploying game changing additive manufacturing, low-cost raw materials, transfer printing along with CMOS technology, we can potentially stick high quality CMOS electronics on any existing objects and embed such electronics into any future objects that will be made. The end goal is to make them smart to augment the quality of our life. We use a particular example on implantable electronics (brain machine interface) and its integration strategy enabled by CMOS device design and technology run path. © (2016) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://proceedings.spiedigitallibrary.org/proceeding.aspx?doi=10.1117/12.2222972en
dc.rightsCopyright 2016 Society of Photo Optical Instrumentation Engineers. One print or electronic copy may be made for personal use only. Systematic reproduction and distribution, duplication of any material in this paper for a fee or for commercial purposes, or modification of the content of the paper are prohibited.en
dc.titleCMOS technology: a critical enabler for free-form electronics-based killer applicationsen
dc.typeConference Paperen
dc.contributor.departmentElectrical Engineering Programen
dc.contributor.departmentMaterials Science and Engineering (MSE)en
dc.identifier.journalMicro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIIIen
dc.conference.dateApril 17, 2016en
dc.conference.nameMicro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications VIIIen
dc.conference.locationBaltimore, Maryland, United Statesen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
kaust.authorHussain, Muhammad Mustafaen
kaust.authorHussain, Aftab M.en
kaust.authorHanna, Amiren
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