Hydrate bearing clayey sediments: Formation and gas production concepts

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/614887
Title:
Hydrate bearing clayey sediments: Formation and gas production concepts
Authors:
Jang, Jaewon ( 0000-0002-9749-4072 ) ; Santamarina, Carlos ( 0000-0001-8708-2827 )
Abstract:
Hydro-thermo-chemo and mechanically coupled processes determine hydrate morphology and control gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments. Force balance, together with mass and energy conservation analyses anchored in published data provide robust asymptotic solutions that reflect governing processes in hydrate systems. Results demonstrate that hydrate segregation in clayey sediments results in a two-material system whereby hydrate lenses are surrounded by hydrate-free water-saturated clay. Hydrate saturation can reach ≈2% by concentrating the excess dissolved gas in the pore water and ≈20% from metabolizable carbon. Higher hydrate saturations are often found in natural sediments and imply methane transport by advection or diffusion processes. Hydrate dissociation is a strongly endothermic event; the available latent heat in a reservoir can sustain significant hydrate dissociation without triggering ice formation during depressurization. The volume of hydrate expands 2-to-4 times upon dissociation or CO2single bondCH4 replacement. Volume expansion can be controlled to maintain lenses open and to create new open mode discontinuities that favor gas recovery. Pore size is the most critical sediment parameter for hydrate formation and gas recovery and is controlled by the smallest grains in a sediment. Therefore any characterization must carefully consider the amount of fines and their associated mineralogy.
KAUST Department:
Earth Science and Engineering
Citation:
Hydrate bearing clayey sediments: Formation and gas production concepts 2016, 77:235 Marine and Petroleum Geology
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Marine and Petroleum Geology
Issue Date:
20-Jun-2016
DOI:
10.1016/j.marpetgeo.2016.06.013
Type:
Article
ISSN:
02648172
Sponsors:
Support for this research was provided by DOE/NETL Methane Hydrate Project (DE-FC26-06NT42963). Additional support was provided by the Goizueta Foundation and KAUST’s endowment.
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264817216301969
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJang, Jaewonen
dc.contributor.authorSantamarina, Carlosen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-28T11:25:47Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-28T11:25:47Z-
dc.date.issued2016-06-20-
dc.identifier.citationHydrate bearing clayey sediments: Formation and gas production concepts 2016, 77:235 Marine and Petroleum Geologyen
dc.identifier.issn02648172-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.marpetgeo.2016.06.013-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/614887-
dc.description.abstractHydro-thermo-chemo and mechanically coupled processes determine hydrate morphology and control gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments. Force balance, together with mass and energy conservation analyses anchored in published data provide robust asymptotic solutions that reflect governing processes in hydrate systems. Results demonstrate that hydrate segregation in clayey sediments results in a two-material system whereby hydrate lenses are surrounded by hydrate-free water-saturated clay. Hydrate saturation can reach ≈2% by concentrating the excess dissolved gas in the pore water and ≈20% from metabolizable carbon. Higher hydrate saturations are often found in natural sediments and imply methane transport by advection or diffusion processes. Hydrate dissociation is a strongly endothermic event; the available latent heat in a reservoir can sustain significant hydrate dissociation without triggering ice formation during depressurization. The volume of hydrate expands 2-to-4 times upon dissociation or CO2single bondCH4 replacement. Volume expansion can be controlled to maintain lenses open and to create new open mode discontinuities that favor gas recovery. Pore size is the most critical sediment parameter for hydrate formation and gas recovery and is controlled by the smallest grains in a sediment. Therefore any characterization must carefully consider the amount of fines and their associated mineralogy.en
dc.description.sponsorshipSupport for this research was provided by DOE/NETL Methane Hydrate Project (DE-FC26-06NT42963). Additional support was provided by the Goizueta Foundation and KAUST’s endowment.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264817216301969en
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Marine and Petroleum Geology. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Marine and Petroleum Geology, 20 June 2016. DOI: 10.1016/j.marpetgeo.2016.06.013en
dc.subjectGas hydrateen
dc.subjectHydrate lensesen
dc.subjectClayey sedimentsen
dc.subjectFrozen grounden
dc.titleHydrate bearing clayey sediments: Formation and gas production conceptsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentEarth Science and Engineeringen
dc.identifier.journalMarine and Petroleum Geologyen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University, USAen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorSantamarina, Carlosen
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