Understanding the risk of scaling and fouling in hollow fiber forward osmosis membrane application

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/614802
Title:
Understanding the risk of scaling and fouling in hollow fiber forward osmosis membrane application
Authors:
Majeed, Tahir; Phuntsho, Sherub; Jeong, Sanghyun; Zhao, Yanxia; Gao, Baoyu; Shon, Ho Kyong
Abstract:
Fouling studies of forward osmosis (FO) were mostly conducted based on fouling evaluation principals applied to pressure membrane processes such as reverse osmosis (RO)/nanofiltration (NF)/microfiltration (MF)/ultrafiltration (UF). For RO/NF/MF/UF processes, the single flux driving force (hydraulic pressure) remains constant, thus the fouling effect is easily evaluated by comparing flux data with the baseline. Whilst, the scenario of fouling effects for FO process is entirely different from RO/NF/MF/UF processes. Continuously changing driving force (osmotic pressure difference), the changes in concentration polarization associated with the varying draw solution/feed solution concentration and the fouling layer effects collectively influence the FO flux. Thus, usual comparison of the FO flux outcome with the baseline results can not exactly indicate the real affect of membrane fouling, rather presents a misleading cumulative effect. This study compares the existing FO fouling technique with an alternate fouling evaluation approach using two FO set-ups. Scaling and fouling risk for hollow fiber FO was separately investigated using synthetic water samples and model organic foulants as alginate, humic acid and bovine serum albumin. Results indicated that FO flux declines up to 5% and 49% in active layer-feed solution and active layer-draw solution orientations respectively.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination & Reuse Research Cntr; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
Citation:
Understanding the risk of scaling and fouling in hollow fiber forward osmosis membrane application 2016 Process Safety and Environmental Protection
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Process Safety and Environmental Protection
Issue Date:
23-Jun-2016
DOI:
10.1016/j.psep.2016.06.023
Type:
Article
ISSN:
09575820
Sponsors:
This research is funded by the National Centre of Excellence in Desalination, Australia (NCEDA). The authors also thank Samsung Cheil Industries, Korea for graciously providing membrane materials for the current study.
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0957582016301094
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMajeed, Tahiren
dc.contributor.authorPhuntsho, Sheruben
dc.contributor.authorJeong, Sanghyunen
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Yanxiaen
dc.contributor.authorGao, Baoyuen
dc.contributor.authorShon, Ho Kyongen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-27T10:37:54Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-27T10:37:54Z-
dc.date.issued2016-06-23-
dc.identifier.citationUnderstanding the risk of scaling and fouling in hollow fiber forward osmosis membrane application 2016 Process Safety and Environmental Protectionen
dc.identifier.issn09575820-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.psep.2016.06.023-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/614802-
dc.description.abstractFouling studies of forward osmosis (FO) were mostly conducted based on fouling evaluation principals applied to pressure membrane processes such as reverse osmosis (RO)/nanofiltration (NF)/microfiltration (MF)/ultrafiltration (UF). For RO/NF/MF/UF processes, the single flux driving force (hydraulic pressure) remains constant, thus the fouling effect is easily evaluated by comparing flux data with the baseline. Whilst, the scenario of fouling effects for FO process is entirely different from RO/NF/MF/UF processes. Continuously changing driving force (osmotic pressure difference), the changes in concentration polarization associated with the varying draw solution/feed solution concentration and the fouling layer effects collectively influence the FO flux. Thus, usual comparison of the FO flux outcome with the baseline results can not exactly indicate the real affect of membrane fouling, rather presents a misleading cumulative effect. This study compares the existing FO fouling technique with an alternate fouling evaluation approach using two FO set-ups. Scaling and fouling risk for hollow fiber FO was separately investigated using synthetic water samples and model organic foulants as alginate, humic acid and bovine serum albumin. Results indicated that FO flux declines up to 5% and 49% in active layer-feed solution and active layer-draw solution orientations respectively.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research is funded by the National Centre of Excellence in Desalination, Australia (NCEDA). The authors also thank Samsung Cheil Industries, Korea for graciously providing membrane materials for the current study.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0957582016301094en
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Process Safety and Environmental Protection. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Process Safety and Environmental Protection, 23 June 2016. DOI: 10.1016/j.psep.2016.06.023en
dc.subjectConcentration polarizationen
dc.subjectFluxen
dc.subjectHollow fiber forward osmosis membraneen
dc.subjectInorganic scalingen
dc.subjectOrganic foulingen
dc.titleUnderstanding the risk of scaling and fouling in hollow fiber forward osmosis membrane applicationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination & Reuse Research Cntren
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalProcess Safety and Environmental Protectionen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Information Technology, University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), PO Box 123, Broadway, NSW 2007en
dc.contributor.institutionKey Laboratory for Special Functional Aggregated Materials of Education Ministry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100, Chinaen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorJeong, Sanghyunen
All Items in KAUST are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.