Drivers of fluorescent dissolved organic matter in the global epipelagic ocean

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/614413
Title:
Drivers of fluorescent dissolved organic matter in the global epipelagic ocean
Authors:
Catalá, T. S.; Álvarez-Salgado, X. A.; Otero, J.; Iuculano, F.; Companys, B.; Horstkotte, B.; Romera-Castillo, C.; Nieto-Cid, M.; Latasa, M.; Morán, X. A. G.; Gasol, J. M.; Marrasé, C.; Stedmon, C. A.; Reche, I.
Abstract:
Fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) in open surface waters (< 200 m) of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans was analysed by excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). A four-component PARAFAC model was fit to the EEMs, which included two humic- (C1 and C2) and two amino acid-like (C3 and C4) components previously identified in ocean waters. Generalized-additive models (GAMs) were used to explore the environmental factors that drive the global distribution of these PARAFAC components. The explained variance for the humic-like components was substantially larger (> 70%) than for the amino acid-like components (< 35%). The environmental variables exhibiting the largest effect on the global distribution of C1 and C2 were apparent oxygen utilisation followed by chlorophyll a. Positive non-linear relationships between both predictor variables and the two humic-like PARAFAC components suggest that their distribution are biologically controlled. Compared with the dark ocean (> 200 m), the relationships of C1 and C2 with AOU indicate a higher C1/AOU and C2/AOU ratios of the humic-like substances in the dark ocean than in the surface ocean where a net effect of photobleaching is also detected. C3 (tryptophan-like) and C4 (tyrosine-like) variability was mostly dictated by salinity (S), by means of positive non-linear relationships, suggesting a primary physical control of their distributions at the global surface ocean scale that could be related to the changing evaporation-precipitation regime. Remarkably, bacterial biomass (BB) only contributed to explain a minor part of the variability of C1 and C4.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Drivers of fluorescent dissolved organic matter in the global epipelagic ocean 2016, 61 (3):1101 Limnology and Oceanography
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
Limnology and Oceanography
Issue Date:
24-Mar-2016
DOI:
10.1002/lno.10281
Type:
Article
ISSN:
00243590
Sponsors:
We thank C.M. Duarte for the coordination of the Malaspina expedition; the chief scientists of the seven legs, the staff of the Marine Technology Unit (CSIC-UTM) and the Captain and crew of R/V Hesp erides for their outright support during the circumnavigation. Also, we thank the Physics block for collecting, calibrating and processing the CTD data. Dolors Blasco for facilitating the nutrients data. T.S.C acknowledges funding through a predoctoral fellowship (reference AP2009-2138) from the Ministerio de Educaci on, Cultura y Deporte. A. Fuentes-Lema and E. Ortega- Retuerta for their contribution to sampling collection and measurements. A. Gomes for coordinating the bacterial analyses. J. Otero was supported by “Junta para la Ampliaci on de Estudios” Fellowship (JAEDoc program 2011) from the CSIC and ESF. M. Nieto-Cid was funded by the EU FP/-IOF project FeBOL-220172 and the CSIC Program “Junta para la Ampliaci on de Estudios” co-financed by the ESF. B. Horstkotte was supported by JAE 2010 Postdoctoral fellowship from the CSIC. This study was financed by the Malaspina 2010 circumnavigation expedition (grant number CSD2008–00077).
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/lno.10281
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCatalá, T. S.en
dc.contributor.authorÁlvarez-Salgado, X. A.en
dc.contributor.authorOtero, J.en
dc.contributor.authorIuculano, F.en
dc.contributor.authorCompanys, B.en
dc.contributor.authorHorstkotte, B.en
dc.contributor.authorRomera-Castillo, C.en
dc.contributor.authorNieto-Cid, M.en
dc.contributor.authorLatasa, M.en
dc.contributor.authorMorán, X. A. G.en
dc.contributor.authorGasol, J. M.en
dc.contributor.authorMarrasé, C.en
dc.contributor.authorStedmon, C. A.en
dc.contributor.authorReche, I.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-23T11:12:25Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-23T11:12:25Z-
dc.date.issued2016-03-24-
dc.identifier.citationDrivers of fluorescent dissolved organic matter in the global epipelagic ocean 2016, 61 (3):1101 Limnology and Oceanographyen
dc.identifier.issn00243590-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/lno.10281-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/614413-
dc.description.abstractFluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) in open surface waters (< 200 m) of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans was analysed by excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). A four-component PARAFAC model was fit to the EEMs, which included two humic- (C1 and C2) and two amino acid-like (C3 and C4) components previously identified in ocean waters. Generalized-additive models (GAMs) were used to explore the environmental factors that drive the global distribution of these PARAFAC components. The explained variance for the humic-like components was substantially larger (> 70%) than for the amino acid-like components (< 35%). The environmental variables exhibiting the largest effect on the global distribution of C1 and C2 were apparent oxygen utilisation followed by chlorophyll a. Positive non-linear relationships between both predictor variables and the two humic-like PARAFAC components suggest that their distribution are biologically controlled. Compared with the dark ocean (> 200 m), the relationships of C1 and C2 with AOU indicate a higher C1/AOU and C2/AOU ratios of the humic-like substances in the dark ocean than in the surface ocean where a net effect of photobleaching is also detected. C3 (tryptophan-like) and C4 (tyrosine-like) variability was mostly dictated by salinity (S), by means of positive non-linear relationships, suggesting a primary physical control of their distributions at the global surface ocean scale that could be related to the changing evaporation-precipitation regime. Remarkably, bacterial biomass (BB) only contributed to explain a minor part of the variability of C1 and C4.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank C.M. Duarte for the coordination of the Malaspina expedition; the chief scientists of the seven legs, the staff of the Marine Technology Unit (CSIC-UTM) and the Captain and crew of R/V Hesp erides for their outright support during the circumnavigation. Also, we thank the Physics block for collecting, calibrating and processing the CTD data. Dolors Blasco for facilitating the nutrients data. T.S.C acknowledges funding through a predoctoral fellowship (reference AP2009-2138) from the Ministerio de Educaci on, Cultura y Deporte. A. Fuentes-Lema and E. Ortega- Retuerta for their contribution to sampling collection and measurements. A. Gomes for coordinating the bacterial analyses. J. Otero was supported by “Junta para la Ampliaci on de Estudios” Fellowship (JAEDoc program 2011) from the CSIC and ESF. M. Nieto-Cid was funded by the EU FP/-IOF project FeBOL-220172 and the CSIC Program “Junta para la Ampliaci on de Estudios” co-financed by the ESF. B. Horstkotte was supported by JAE 2010 Postdoctoral fellowship from the CSIC. This study was financed by the Malaspina 2010 circumnavigation expedition (grant number CSD2008–00077).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/lno.10281en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Limnology and Oceanographyen
dc.titleDrivers of fluorescent dissolved organic matter in the global epipelagic oceanen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalLimnology and Oceanographyen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartamento de Ecología and Instituto del Agua; Universidad de Granada; Granada Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionCSIC Instituto de Investigacións Mariñas; Vigo Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionCSIC Instituto de Investigacións Mariñas; Vigo Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionUIB - CSIC Instituto Mediterráneo de Estudios Avanzados; Esporles Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionCSIC Institut de Ciències del Mar; Barcelona Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Pharmacy; Charles University; Hradec Králové, Prague, Czech Republicen
dc.contributor.institutionCSIC Instituto de Investigacións Mariñas; Vigo Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionCSIC Instituto de Investigacións Mariñas; Vigo Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionIEO Centro Oceanográfico de Gijón/Xixón; Gijón/Xixón Asturias Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionIEO Centro Oceanográfico de Gijón/Xixón; Gijón/Xixón Asturias Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionCSIC Institut de Ciències del Mar; Barcelona Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionCSIC Institut de Ciències del Mar; Barcelona Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionNational Institute of Aquatic Resources, Technical University of Denmark; Charlottenlund Denmarken
dc.contributor.institutionDepartamento de Ecología and Instituto del Agua; Universidad de Granada; Granada Spainen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorMoran, X. A. G.en
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