Hydro-chemo-mechanical coupling in sediments: Localized mineral dissolution

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/613688
Title:
Hydro-chemo-mechanical coupling in sediments: Localized mineral dissolution
Authors:
Cha, Minsu ( 0000-0002-3975-9052 ) ; Santamarina, Carlos ( 0000-0001-8708-2827 )
Abstract:
Mineral dissolution is inherently a chemo-hydro-mechanical coupled process. Field evidence and laboratory results show that dissolution may localize and form open conduits in cohesive media such as carbonate rocks. This study focuses on the evolution of localized dissolution in soils (i.e., frictional and non-cohesive granular materials) under effective confining stresses. Experimental results show the development of localized dissolution (“pipe”) when a carbonate-quartz sand is subjected to reactive fluid flow: only loosely packed quartz grains remain within pipes, and the number of pipes decreases away from the inlet port. Concurrent shear wave velocity measurements show a decrease in stiffness during dissolution due to stress and fabric changes, and more complex signal codas anticipate the development of internal heterogeneity. The discrete element method is used to simulate localized vertical dissolution features in granular materials, under constant vertical stress and zero lateral strain far-field boundaries. As porosity increases along dissolution pipes, vertical load is transferred to the surrounding soils and marked force chains develop. In terms of equivalent stress, principal stress rotation takes place within pipes and the sediment reaches the Coulomb failure condition inside pipes and in the surrounding medium. Dissolution pipes alter the geo-plumbing of the subsurface, enhance fluid transport but limit the long term performance of storage systems, alter the fluid pressure and effective stress fields, soften the sediment and may trigger shear failures.
KAUST Department:
Earth Science and Engineering
Citation:
Hydro-chemo-mechanical coupling in sediments: Localized mineral dissolution 2016 Geomechanics for Energy and the Environment
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Geomechanics for Energy and the Environment
Issue Date:
11-Jun-2016
DOI:
10.1016/j.gete.2016.06.001
Type:
Article
ISSN:
23523808
Sponsors:
Support for this research was provided by the Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office led by Dr. B. Gutierrez. Additional support was provided by the Goizueta Foundation. The authors are grateful to the anonymous reviewers for their valuable comments.
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2352380816300454
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCha, Minsuen
dc.contributor.authorSantamarina, Carlosen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-20T10:22:25Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-20T10:22:25Z-
dc.date.issued2016-06-11-
dc.identifier.citationHydro-chemo-mechanical coupling in sediments: Localized mineral dissolution 2016 Geomechanics for Energy and the Environmenten
dc.identifier.issn23523808-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.gete.2016.06.001-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/613688-
dc.description.abstractMineral dissolution is inherently a chemo-hydro-mechanical coupled process. Field evidence and laboratory results show that dissolution may localize and form open conduits in cohesive media such as carbonate rocks. This study focuses on the evolution of localized dissolution in soils (i.e., frictional and non-cohesive granular materials) under effective confining stresses. Experimental results show the development of localized dissolution (“pipe”) when a carbonate-quartz sand is subjected to reactive fluid flow: only loosely packed quartz grains remain within pipes, and the number of pipes decreases away from the inlet port. Concurrent shear wave velocity measurements show a decrease in stiffness during dissolution due to stress and fabric changes, and more complex signal codas anticipate the development of internal heterogeneity. The discrete element method is used to simulate localized vertical dissolution features in granular materials, under constant vertical stress and zero lateral strain far-field boundaries. As porosity increases along dissolution pipes, vertical load is transferred to the surrounding soils and marked force chains develop. In terms of equivalent stress, principal stress rotation takes place within pipes and the sediment reaches the Coulomb failure condition inside pipes and in the surrounding medium. Dissolution pipes alter the geo-plumbing of the subsurface, enhance fluid transport but limit the long term performance of storage systems, alter the fluid pressure and effective stress fields, soften the sediment and may trigger shear failures.en
dc.description.sponsorshipSupport for this research was provided by the Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office led by Dr. B. Gutierrez. Additional support was provided by the Goizueta Foundation. The authors are grateful to the anonymous reviewers for their valuable comments.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S2352380816300454en
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Geomechanics for Energy and the Environment. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Geomechanics for Energy and the Environment, 11 June 2016. DOI: 10.1016/j.gete.2016.06.001en
dc.subjectMineral dissolutionen
dc.subjectOne-dimensional flow testen
dc.subjectReactive flowen
dc.subjectDiscrete element methoden
dc.subjectLocalized dissolutionen
dc.subjectHydro-chemo-mechanical couplingen
dc.titleHydro-chemo-mechanical coupling in sediments: Localized mineral dissolutionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentEarth Science and Engineeringen
dc.identifier.journalGeomechanics for Energy and the Environmenten
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Civil Engineering, Texas A&M University, 3136 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-3136, USAen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorSantamarina, Carlosen
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