Comparative genomics explains the evolutionary success of reef-forming corals

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/613035
Title:
Comparative genomics explains the evolutionary success of reef-forming corals
Authors:
Bhattacharya, Debashish; Agrawal, Shobhit; Aranda, Manuel ( 0000-0001-6673-016X ) ; Baumgarten, Sebastian ( 0000-0003-2646-7699 ) ; Belcaid, Mahdi; Drake, Jeana L; Erwin, Douglas; Foret, Sylvian; Gates, Ruth D; Gruber, David F; Kamel, Bishoy ( 0000-0003-2934-3827 ) ; Lesser, Michael P; Levy, Oren; Liew, Yi Jin ( 0000-0003-2553-8870 ) ; MacManes, Matthew ( 0000-0002-2368-6960 ) ; Mass, Tali; Medina, Monica; Mehr, Shaadi; Meyer, Eli; Price, Dana C; Putnam, Hollie M; Qiu, Huan; Shinzato, Chuya; Shoguchi, Eiichi; Stokes, Alexander J ( 0000-0002-3526-4685 ) ; Tambutté, Sylvie; Tchernov, Dan; Voolstra, Christian R. ( 0000-0003-4555-3795 ) ; Wagner, Nicole; Walker, Charles W; Weber, Andreas PM; Weis, Virginia; Zelzion, Ehud; Zoccola, Didier ( 0000-0002-1524-8098 ) ; Falkowski, Paul G ( 0000-0002-2353-1969 )
Abstract:
Transcriptome and genome data from twenty stony coral species and a selection of reference bilaterians were studied to elucidate coral evolutionary history. We identified genes that encode the proteins responsible for the precipitation and aggregation of the aragonite skeleton on which the organisms live, and revealed a network of environmental sensors that coordinate responses of the host animals to temperature, light, and pH. Furthermore, we describe a variety of stress-related pathways, including apoptotic pathways that allow the host animals to detoxify reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that are generated by their intracellular photosynthetic symbionts, and determine the fate of corals under environmental stress. Some of these genes arose through horizontal gene transfer and comprise at least 0.2% of the animal gene inventory. Our analysis elucidates the evolutionary strategies that have allowed symbiotic corals to adapt and thrive for hundreds of millions of years.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
Citation:
Comparative genomics explains the evolutionary success of reef-forming corals 2016, 5 eLife
Publisher:
eLife Sciences Organisation, Ltd.
Journal:
eLife
Issue Date:
24-May-2016
DOI:
10.7554/eLife.13288
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2050-084X
Sponsors:
This work was made possible by grants from the National Science Foundation, especially EF-1408097, to PGF, DB, RDG, HMP and TM, which sponsored the workshop. Additional funding was provided by the National Science Foundation through grants EF-1041143/RU 432635 and EF-1416785 awarded to PGF, DB, and TM, respectively. RDG, HMP, and AJS were supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, NIMHD P20MD006084, the Hawaii Community Foundation, Leahi Fund 13ADVC-60228 and NSF OCE PRF 1323822 and National Science Foundation Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research Hawaii: EPS-0903833. CRV and MA acknowledge funding by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).
Additional Links:
http://elifesciences.org/lookup/doi/10.7554/eLife.13288
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBhattacharya, Debashishen
dc.contributor.authorAgrawal, Shobhiten
dc.contributor.authorAranda, Manuelen
dc.contributor.authorBaumgarten, Sebastianen
dc.contributor.authorBelcaid, Mahdien
dc.contributor.authorDrake, Jeana Len
dc.contributor.authorErwin, Douglasen
dc.contributor.authorForet, Sylvianen
dc.contributor.authorGates, Ruth Den
dc.contributor.authorGruber, David Fen
dc.contributor.authorKamel, Bishoyen
dc.contributor.authorLesser, Michael Pen
dc.contributor.authorLevy, Orenen
dc.contributor.authorLiew, Yi Jinen
dc.contributor.authorMacManes, Matthewen
dc.contributor.authorMass, Talien
dc.contributor.authorMedina, Monicaen
dc.contributor.authorMehr, Shaadien
dc.contributor.authorMeyer, Elien
dc.contributor.authorPrice, Dana Cen
dc.contributor.authorPutnam, Hollie Men
dc.contributor.authorQiu, Huanen
dc.contributor.authorShinzato, Chuyaen
dc.contributor.authorShoguchi, Eiichien
dc.contributor.authorStokes, Alexander Jen
dc.contributor.authorTambutté, Sylvieen
dc.contributor.authorTchernov, Danen
dc.contributor.authorVoolstra, Christian R.en
dc.contributor.authorWagner, Nicoleen
dc.contributor.authorWalker, Charles Wen
dc.contributor.authorWeber, Andreas PMen
dc.contributor.authorWeis, Virginiaen
dc.contributor.authorZelzion, Ehuden
dc.contributor.authorZoccola, Didieren
dc.contributor.authorFalkowski, Paul Gen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-14T09:19:07Z-
dc.date.available2016-06-14T09:19:07Z-
dc.date.issued2016-05-24-
dc.identifier.citationComparative genomics explains the evolutionary success of reef-forming corals 2016, 5 eLifeen
dc.identifier.issn2050-084X-
dc.identifier.doi10.7554/eLife.13288-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/613035-
dc.description.abstractTranscriptome and genome data from twenty stony coral species and a selection of reference bilaterians were studied to elucidate coral evolutionary history. We identified genes that encode the proteins responsible for the precipitation and aggregation of the aragonite skeleton on which the organisms live, and revealed a network of environmental sensors that coordinate responses of the host animals to temperature, light, and pH. Furthermore, we describe a variety of stress-related pathways, including apoptotic pathways that allow the host animals to detoxify reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that are generated by their intracellular photosynthetic symbionts, and determine the fate of corals under environmental stress. Some of these genes arose through horizontal gene transfer and comprise at least 0.2% of the animal gene inventory. Our analysis elucidates the evolutionary strategies that have allowed symbiotic corals to adapt and thrive for hundreds of millions of years.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was made possible by grants from the National Science Foundation, especially EF-1408097, to PGF, DB, RDG, HMP and TM, which sponsored the workshop. Additional funding was provided by the National Science Foundation through grants EF-1041143/RU 432635 and EF-1416785 awarded to PGF, DB, and TM, respectively. RDG, HMP, and AJS were supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, NIMHD P20MD006084, the Hawaii Community Foundation, Leahi Fund 13ADVC-60228 and NSF OCE PRF 1323822 and National Science Foundation Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research Hawaii: EPS-0903833. CRV and MA acknowledge funding by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publishereLife Sciences Organisation, Ltd.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://elifesciences.org/lookup/doi/10.7554/eLife.13288en
dc.rightsThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use and redistribution provided that the original author and source are credited. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleComparative genomics explains the evolutionary success of reef-forming coralsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journaleLifeen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Ecology, Evolution and Natural Resources, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionHawaii Institute of Marine Biology, Kaneohe, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionEnvironmental Biophysics and Molecular Ecology Program, Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionSmithsonian Institution, National Museum of Natural History, Washington, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionResearch School of Biology, Australian National University, Canberra, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionAmerican Museum of Natural History, Sackler Institute for Comparative Genomics, New York, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Natural Sciences, City University of New York, Baruch College and The Graduate Center, New York, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Biology, Mueller Lab, Penn State University, University Park, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Marine Science and Ocean Engineering, University of New Hampshire, Durham, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionThe Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gam, Israelen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Molecular, Cellular and Biomedical Sciences, University of New Hampshire, Durham, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionMarine Biology Department, The Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences, University of Haifa, Mt. Carmel, Israelen
dc.contributor.institutionBiological Science Department, State University of New York, College at Old Westbury, New York, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Integrative Biology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Plant Biology and Pathology, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionMarine Genomics Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, Okinawa, Japanen
dc.contributor.institutionLaboratory of Experimental Medicine and Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Honolulu, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionChaminade University, Honolulu, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionCentre Scientifique de Monaco, Quai Antoine Ier, Monacoen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitute of Plant Biochemistry, Heinrich-Heine-Universitat, Dusseldorf, Germanyen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Rutgers University, New Jersey, United Statesen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorAgrawal, Shobhiten
kaust.authorAranda, Manuelen
kaust.authorBaumgarten, Sebastianen
kaust.authorLiew, Yi Jinen
kaust.authorVoolstra, Christian R.en
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