CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Immunity to Geminiviruses: Differential Interference and Evasion

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/611199
Title:
CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Immunity to Geminiviruses: Differential Interference and Evasion
Authors:
Ali, Zahir ( 0000-0002-7814-8908 ) ; Ali, Shakila; Tashkandi, Manal; Zaidi, Syed Shan-e-Ali; Mahfouz, Magdy M. ( 0000-0002-0616-6365 )
Abstract:
The CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently been used to confer molecular immunity against several eukaryotic viruses, including plant DNA geminiviruses. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the efficiencies of targeting different coding and non-coding sequences in the genomes of multiple geminiviruses. Moreover, we analyze the ability of geminiviruses to evade the CRISPR/Cas9 machinery. Our results demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 machinery can efficiently target coding and non-coding sequences and interfere with various geminiviruses. Furthermore, targeting the coding sequences of different geminiviruses resulted in the generation of viral variants capable of replication and systemic movement. By contrast, targeting the noncoding intergenic region sequences of geminiviruses resulted in interference, but with inefficient recovery of mutated viral variants, which thus limited the generation of variants capable of replication and movement. Taken together, our results indicate that targeting noncoding, intergenic sequences provides viral interference activity and significantly limits the generation of viral variants capable of replication and systemic infection, which is essential for developing durable resistance strategies for long-term virus control.
KAUST Department:
Laboratory for Genome Engineering; Biological Sciences
Citation:
CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Immunity to Geminiviruses: Differential Interference and Evasion 2016, 6:26912 Scientific Reports
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Journal:
Scientific Reports
Issue Date:
26-May-2016
DOI:
10.1038/srep26912
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2045-2322
Sponsors:
We wish to thank members of the Laboratory for Genome Engineering at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology for helpful discussions and comments. The study was supported by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology.
Additional Links:
http://www.nature.com/articles/srep26912
Appears in Collections:
Articles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAli, Zahiren
dc.contributor.authorAli, Shakilaen
dc.contributor.authorTashkandi, Manalen
dc.contributor.authorZaidi, Syed Shan-e-Alien
dc.contributor.authorMahfouz, Magdy M.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-30T13:27:23Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-30T13:27:23Z-
dc.date.issued2016-05-26-
dc.identifier.citationCRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Immunity to Geminiviruses: Differential Interference and Evasion 2016, 6:26912 Scientific Reportsen
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep26912-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/611199-
dc.description.abstractThe CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently been used to confer molecular immunity against several eukaryotic viruses, including plant DNA geminiviruses. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the efficiencies of targeting different coding and non-coding sequences in the genomes of multiple geminiviruses. Moreover, we analyze the ability of geminiviruses to evade the CRISPR/Cas9 machinery. Our results demonstrate that the CRISPR/Cas9 machinery can efficiently target coding and non-coding sequences and interfere with various geminiviruses. Furthermore, targeting the coding sequences of different geminiviruses resulted in the generation of viral variants capable of replication and systemic movement. By contrast, targeting the noncoding intergenic region sequences of geminiviruses resulted in interference, but with inefficient recovery of mutated viral variants, which thus limited the generation of variants capable of replication and movement. Taken together, our results indicate that targeting noncoding, intergenic sequences provides viral interference activity and significantly limits the generation of viral variants capable of replication and systemic infection, which is essential for developing durable resistance strategies for long-term virus control.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe wish to thank members of the Laboratory for Genome Engineering at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology for helpful discussions and comments. The study was supported by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer Natureen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/srep26912en
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleCRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Immunity to Geminiviruses: Differential Interference and Evasionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentLaboratory for Genome Engineeringen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological Sciencesen
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorAli, Zahiren
kaust.authorAli, Shakilaen
kaust.authorTashkandi, Manalen
kaust.authorZaidi, Syed Shan-e-Alien
kaust.authorMahfouz, Magdy M.en
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