Analysis of Stomatal Patterning in Selected Mutants of MAPK Pathways

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/608677
Title:
Analysis of Stomatal Patterning in Selected Mutants of MAPK Pathways
Authors:
Felemban, Abrar ( 0000-0002-3531-6967 )
Abstract:
Stomata are cellular valves in plants that play an essential role in the regulation of gas exchange and are distributed in the epidermis of aerial organs. In Arabidopsis thaliana, stomatal production and development are coordinated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway, which modulates a variety of other processes, including cell proliferation, regulation of cytokinesis, programed cell death, and response to abiotic and biotic stress. The environment also plays a role in stomatal development, by influencing the frequency at which stomata develop in leaves. This thesis presents an analysis of stomatal development in Arabidopsis mutants in two MAPK pathways: MEKK1-MKK1/MKK2-MPK4, and MAP3K17/18-MKK3. Obtained results demonstrate the effect of stress conditions on stomatal development and specify the involvement of analysed MAPK in stomatal patterning. First, both analysed pathways modulate stomatal patterning in Arabidopsis cotyledons. Second, plant growth-promoting bacteria tested enhance stomatal density and affect guard cell morphology. Third, the sucrose or mannitol treatment increases defects in stomatal patterning. Finally, salt stress or high temperature can suppress stomatal defects in mutants of the MEKK1-MKK1/MKK2-MPK4 pathway.
Advisors:
Hirt, Heribert ( 0000-0003-3119-9633 )
Committee Member:
Voolstra, Christian R. ( 0000-0003-4555-3795 ) ; Fischle, Wolfgang ( 0000-0002-2335-8932 )
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Bioscience
Program:
Bioscience
Issue Date:
May-2016
Type:
Thesis
Appears in Collections:
Theses; Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.advisorHirt, Heriberten
dc.contributor.authorFelemban, Abraren
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-09T11:25:56Zen
dc.date.available2016-05-09T11:25:56Zen
dc.date.issued2016-05en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/608677en
dc.description.abstractStomata are cellular valves in plants that play an essential role in the regulation of gas exchange and are distributed in the epidermis of aerial organs. In Arabidopsis thaliana, stomatal production and development are coordinated by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway, which modulates a variety of other processes, including cell proliferation, regulation of cytokinesis, programed cell death, and response to abiotic and biotic stress. The environment also plays a role in stomatal development, by influencing the frequency at which stomata develop in leaves. This thesis presents an analysis of stomatal development in Arabidopsis mutants in two MAPK pathways: MEKK1-MKK1/MKK2-MPK4, and MAP3K17/18-MKK3. Obtained results demonstrate the effect of stress conditions on stomatal development and specify the involvement of analysed MAPK in stomatal patterning. First, both analysed pathways modulate stomatal patterning in Arabidopsis cotyledons. Second, plant growth-promoting bacteria tested enhance stomatal density and affect guard cell morphology. Third, the sucrose or mannitol treatment increases defects in stomatal patterning. Finally, salt stress or high temperature can suppress stomatal defects in mutants of the MEKK1-MKK1/MKK2-MPK4 pathway.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectStomatal Patterningen
dc.subjectMAPK Pathwayen
dc.subjectArabidopsis Thalianaen
dc.subjectPlant Stressen
dc.subjecttranscription regulationen
dc.titleAnalysis of Stomatal Patterning in Selected Mutants of MAPK Pathwaysen
dc.typeThesisen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentBioscienceen
thesis.degree.grantorKing Abdullah University of Science and Technologyen_GB
dc.contributor.committeememberVoolstra, Christian R.en
dc.contributor.committeememberFischle, Wolfgangen
thesis.degree.disciplineBioscienceen
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Scienceen
dc.person.id133904en
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