Impact of mooring activities on carbon stocks in seagrass meadows

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/601579
Title:
Impact of mooring activities on carbon stocks in seagrass meadows
Authors:
Serrano, O.; Ruhon, R.; Lavery, P. S.; Kendrick, G. A.; Hickey, S.; Masqué, P.; Arias-Ortiz, A.; Steven, A.; Duarte, Carlos M. ( 0000-0002-1213-1361 )
Abstract:
Boating activities are one of the causes that threaten seagrass meadows and the ecosystem services they provide. Mechanical destruction of seagrass habitats may also trigger the erosion of sedimentary organic carbon (Corg) stocks, which may contribute to increasing atmospheric CO2. This study presents the first estimates of loss of Corg stocks in seagrass meadows due to mooring activities in Rottnest Island, Western Australia. Sediment cores were sampled from seagrass meadows and from bare but previously vegetated sediments underneath moorings. The Corg stores have been compromised by the mooring deployment from 1930s onwards, which involved both the erosion of existing sedimentary Corg stores and the lack of further accumulation of Corg. On average, undisturbed meadows had accumulated ~6.4 Kg Corg m−2 in the upper 50 cm-thick deposits at a rate of 34 g Corg m−2 yr−1. The comparison of Corg stores between meadows and mooring scars allows us to estimate a loss of 4.8 kg Corg m−2 in the 50 cm-thick deposits accumulated over ca. 200 yr as a result of mooring deployments. These results provide key data for the implementation of Corg storage credit offset policies to avoid the conversion of seagrass ecosystems and contribute to their preservation.
KAUST Department:
Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)
Citation:
Impact of mooring activities on carbon stocks in seagrass meadows 2016, 6:23193 Scientific Reports
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Journal:
Scientific Reports
Issue Date:
16-Mar-2016
DOI:
10.1038/srep23193
Type:
Article
ISSN:
2045-2322
Sponsors:
This work was supported by the ECU Faculty Research Grant Scheme and the CSIRO Flagship Marine & Coastal Carbon Biogeochemical Cluster (Coastal Carbon Cluster). RR was funded by the Australia Award Scholarship. PM was supported in part by a Gledden Visiting Fellowship awarded by the The University of Western Australia and the Generalitat de Catalunya (MERS 2014 SGR – 1356. AAO was supported by a PhD grant of Obra Social “la Caixa”. GAK was partly funded by an ARC Linkage grant (LP130100155). The authors are grateful to T. Rocha, Y. Brasil, C. Bedulli, H. Jabour, R. Czarnik, Y. Olsen, and I. Hendricks for their help in field and/or laboratory tasks, and to J. Coombes, U. Hernawan and J. Lo for statistical support.
Additional Links:
http://www.nature.com/articles/srep23193
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Red Sea Research Center (RSRC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSerrano, O.en
dc.contributor.authorRuhon, R.en
dc.contributor.authorLavery, P. S.en
dc.contributor.authorKendrick, G. A.en
dc.contributor.authorHickey, S.en
dc.contributor.authorMasqué, P.en
dc.contributor.authorArias-Ortiz, A.en
dc.contributor.authorSteven, A.en
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-17T13:15:47Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-17T13:15:47Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-16en
dc.identifier.citationImpact of mooring activities on carbon stocks in seagrass meadows 2016, 6:23193 Scientific Reportsen
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/srep23193en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/601579en
dc.description.abstractBoating activities are one of the causes that threaten seagrass meadows and the ecosystem services they provide. Mechanical destruction of seagrass habitats may also trigger the erosion of sedimentary organic carbon (Corg) stocks, which may contribute to increasing atmospheric CO2. This study presents the first estimates of loss of Corg stocks in seagrass meadows due to mooring activities in Rottnest Island, Western Australia. Sediment cores were sampled from seagrass meadows and from bare but previously vegetated sediments underneath moorings. The Corg stores have been compromised by the mooring deployment from 1930s onwards, which involved both the erosion of existing sedimentary Corg stores and the lack of further accumulation of Corg. On average, undisturbed meadows had accumulated ~6.4 Kg Corg m−2 in the upper 50 cm-thick deposits at a rate of 34 g Corg m−2 yr−1. The comparison of Corg stores between meadows and mooring scars allows us to estimate a loss of 4.8 kg Corg m−2 in the 50 cm-thick deposits accumulated over ca. 200 yr as a result of mooring deployments. These results provide key data for the implementation of Corg storage credit offset policies to avoid the conversion of seagrass ecosystems and contribute to their preservation.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the ECU Faculty Research Grant Scheme and the CSIRO Flagship Marine & Coastal Carbon Biogeochemical Cluster (Coastal Carbon Cluster). RR was funded by the Australia Award Scholarship. PM was supported in part by a Gledden Visiting Fellowship awarded by the The University of Western Australia and the Generalitat de Catalunya (MERS 2014 SGR – 1356. AAO was supported by a PhD grant of Obra Social “la Caixa”. GAK was partly funded by an ARC Linkage grant (LP130100155). The authors are grateful to T. Rocha, Y. Brasil, C. Bedulli, H. Jabour, R. Czarnik, Y. Olsen, and I. Hendricks for their help in field and/or laboratory tasks, and to J. Coombes, U. Hernawan and J. Lo for statistical support.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nature.com/articles/srep23193en
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleImpact of mooring activities on carbon stocks in seagrass meadowsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRed Sea Research Center (RSRC)en
dc.identifier.journalScientific Reportsen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Science and Centre for Marine Ecosystems Research, Edith Cowan University, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup WA 6027, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionUWA Oceans Institute, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley 6009, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionCentro de Estudios Avanzados de Blanes, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas; Acceso a la Cala S. Francesc 14, 17300 Blanes, Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Plant Biology, The University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionResearch and Development Centre for Marine, Coast, and Small Islands, Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia 90245en
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Earth and Environment, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionInstitut de Ciència i Tecnologia Ambientals and Departament de Física, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Bellaterra, 08193 Barcelona, Spainen
dc.contributor.institutionSchool of Physics, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionCSIRO, EcoSciences Precinct-Dutton Park 41 Boggo Road Dutton Park QLD 4102, Australiaen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorDuarte, Carlos M.en
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