Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/601417
Title:
The power of data: structural bioinformatics yesterday and today
Authors:
Tramontano, Anna
Abstract:
The protein structure database was established in 1971. At the time it contained seven structures, today there are more than 100,000. The improvement is not only a matter of quantity, but also of quality. Did we effectively exploit this information to gain knowledge? The answer is certainly affirmative. I will illustrate how this wealth of experimental data has allowed us to explore the landscape of macromolecular structures on one side, and to uncover the properties of specific protein families on the other. The latter plays an essential role in pursuing exciting new avenues in biomedical and biotechnological sciences. Experimental data are also part of a virtuous cycle whereby they reinforce and guide our ability to infer unknown macromolecular structures, which, while providing relevant information to scientists, permits to gauge the level of our understanding of the complex problem of protein folding. A paradigmatic example of the latter is represented by the “Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction” (CASP) initiative that I will briefly discuss.
Conference/Event name:
KAUST Research Conference on Computational and Experimental Interfaces of Big Data and Biotechnology
Issue Date:
25-Jan-2016
Type:
Presentation
Appears in Collections:
KAUST Research Conference on Computational and Experimental Interfaces of Big Data and Biotechnology, January 2016

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTramontano, Annaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-16T12:53:39Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-16T12:53:39Zen
dc.date.issued2016-01-25en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/601417en
dc.description.abstractThe protein structure database was established in 1971. At the time it contained seven structures, today there are more than 100,000. The improvement is not only a matter of quantity, but also of quality. Did we effectively exploit this information to gain knowledge? The answer is certainly affirmative. I will illustrate how this wealth of experimental data has allowed us to explore the landscape of macromolecular structures on one side, and to uncover the properties of specific protein families on the other. The latter plays an essential role in pursuing exciting new avenues in biomedical and biotechnological sciences. Experimental data are also part of a virtuous cycle whereby they reinforce and guide our ability to infer unknown macromolecular structures, which, while providing relevant information to scientists, permits to gauge the level of our understanding of the complex problem of protein folding. A paradigmatic example of the latter is represented by the “Critical Assessment of Techniques for Protein Structure Prediction” (CASP) initiative that I will briefly discuss.en
dc.titleThe power of data: structural bioinformatics yesterday and todayen
dc.typePresentationen
dc.conference.dateJanuary 25-27, 2016en
dc.conference.nameKAUST Research Conference on Computational and Experimental Interfaces of Big Data and Biotechnologyen
dc.conference.locationKAUST, Thuwal, Saudi Arabiaen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Romeen
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