Biological Stability of Drinking Water: Controlling Factors, Methods, and Challenges

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/600718
Title:
Biological Stability of Drinking Water: Controlling Factors, Methods, and Challenges
Authors:
Prest, Emmanuelle I.; Hammes, Frederik; van Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.; Vrouwenvelder, Johannes S. ( 0000-0003-2668-2057 )
Abstract:
Biological stability of drinking water refers to the concept of providing consumers with drinking water of same microbial quality at the tap as produced at the water treatment facility. However, uncontrolled growth of bacteria can occur during distribution in water mains and premise plumbing, and can lead to hygienic (e.g., development of opportunistic pathogens), aesthetic (e.g., deterioration of taste, odor, color) or operational (e.g., fouling or biocorrosion of pipes) problems. Drinking water contains diverse microorganisms competing for limited available nutrients for growth. Bacterial growth and interactions are regulated by factors, such as (i) type and concentration of available organic and inorganic nutrients, (ii) type and concentration of residual disinfectant, (iii) presence of predators, such as protozoa and invertebrates, (iv) environmental conditions, such as water temperature, and (v) spatial location of microorganisms (bulk water, sediment, or biofilm). Water treatment and distribution conditions in water mains and premise plumbing affect each of these factors and shape bacterial community characteristics (abundance, composition, viability) in distribution systems. Improved understanding of bacterial interactions in distribution systems and of environmental conditions impact is needed for better control of bacterial communities during drinking water production and distribution. This article reviews (i) existing knowledge on biological stability controlling factors and (ii) how these factors are affected by drinking water production and distribution conditions. In addition, (iii) the concept of biological stability is discussed in light of experience with well-established and new analytical methods, enabling high throughput analysis and in-depth characterization of bacterial communities in drinking water. We discussed, how knowledge gained from novel techniques will improve design and monitoring of water treatment and distribution systems in order to maintain good drinking water microbial quality up to consumer’s tap. A new definition and methodological approach for biological stability is proposed.
KAUST Department:
Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)
Citation:
Biological Stability of Drinking Water: Controlling Factors, Methods, and Challenges 2016, 7 Frontiers in Microbiology
Publisher:
Frontiers Media SA
Journal:
Frontiers in Microbiology
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2016
DOI:
10.3389/fmicb.2016.00045
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1664-302X
Sponsors:
This publication is based upon work supported by Evides Waterbedrijf and the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Office of Sponsored Research (OSR) under Award No. URF/1/1728-01-01.
Additional Links:
http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fmicb.2016.00045
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPrest, Emmanuelle I.en
dc.contributor.authorHammes, Frederiken
dc.contributor.authorvan Loosdrecht, Mark C. M.en
dc.contributor.authorVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-07T13:06:21Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-07T13:06:21Zen
dc.date.issued2016-02-01en
dc.identifier.citationBiological Stability of Drinking Water: Controlling Factors, Methods, and Challenges 2016, 7 Frontiers in Microbiologyen
dc.identifier.issn1664-302Xen
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fmicb.2016.00045en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/600718en
dc.description.abstractBiological stability of drinking water refers to the concept of providing consumers with drinking water of same microbial quality at the tap as produced at the water treatment facility. However, uncontrolled growth of bacteria can occur during distribution in water mains and premise plumbing, and can lead to hygienic (e.g., development of opportunistic pathogens), aesthetic (e.g., deterioration of taste, odor, color) or operational (e.g., fouling or biocorrosion of pipes) problems. Drinking water contains diverse microorganisms competing for limited available nutrients for growth. Bacterial growth and interactions are regulated by factors, such as (i) type and concentration of available organic and inorganic nutrients, (ii) type and concentration of residual disinfectant, (iii) presence of predators, such as protozoa and invertebrates, (iv) environmental conditions, such as water temperature, and (v) spatial location of microorganisms (bulk water, sediment, or biofilm). Water treatment and distribution conditions in water mains and premise plumbing affect each of these factors and shape bacterial community characteristics (abundance, composition, viability) in distribution systems. Improved understanding of bacterial interactions in distribution systems and of environmental conditions impact is needed for better control of bacterial communities during drinking water production and distribution. This article reviews (i) existing knowledge on biological stability controlling factors and (ii) how these factors are affected by drinking water production and distribution conditions. In addition, (iii) the concept of biological stability is discussed in light of experience with well-established and new analytical methods, enabling high throughput analysis and in-depth characterization of bacterial communities in drinking water. We discussed, how knowledge gained from novel techniques will improve design and monitoring of water treatment and distribution systems in order to maintain good drinking water microbial quality up to consumer’s tap. A new definition and methodological approach for biological stability is proposed.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis publication is based upon work supported by Evides Waterbedrijf and the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Office of Sponsored Research (OSR) under Award No. URF/1/1728-01-01.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFrontiers Media SAen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fmicb.2016.00045en
dc.rightsThis is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectbacterial competitionen
dc.subjectwater treatment optimizationen
dc.subjectwater distribution conditionsen
dc.subjectflow cytometryen
dc.subjectbacterial growth potentialen
dc.titleBiological Stability of Drinking Water: Controlling Factors, Methods, and Challengesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Microbiologyen
dc.eprint.versionPublisher's Version/PDFen
dc.contributor.institutionEnvironmental Biotechnology Group, Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Delft, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Environmental Microbiology, Eawag – Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Dübendorf, Switzerlanden
dc.contributor.institutionWetsus – European Centre of Excellence for Sustainable Water Technology, Leeuwarden, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorVrouwenvelder, Johannes S.en
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