Effect of microbial community structure on organic removal and biofouling in membrane adsorption bioreactor used in seawater pretreatment

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/600680
Title:
Effect of microbial community structure on organic removal and biofouling in membrane adsorption bioreactor used in seawater pretreatment
Authors:
Jeong, Sanghyun; Cho, Kyungjin; Bae, Hyokwan; Keshvardoust, Pejhman; Rice, Scott A.; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu; Lee, Seockheon; Leiknes, TorOve ( 0000-0003-4046-5622 )
Abstract:
Membrane bioreactors (MBRs) were operated on-site for 56 d with different powdered activated carbon (PAC) dosages of 0, 1.5 and 5.0 g/L to pretreat seawater for reverse osmosis desalination. It was hypothesized that PAC would stimulate adsorption and biological degradation of organic compounds. The microbial communities responsible for biofouling on microfiltration (MF) membranes and biological organic removal in MBR were assessed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting and 454-pyrosequencing. The PAC addition improved assimilable organic carbon removal (53-59%), and resulted in reduced biofouling development on MF (> 50%) with only a marginal development in trans-membrane pressure. Interestingly, the bacterial community composition was significantly differentiated by the PAC addition. Cyanobacterium, Pelagibaca and Maricoccus were dominant in the PAC-free conditions, while Thiothrix and Sphingomonas were presumably responsible for the better reactor performances in PAC-added conditions. In contrast, the archaeal communities were consistent with predominance of Candidatus Nitrosopumilus. These data therefore show that the addition of PAC can improve MBR performance by developing different bacterial species, controlling AOC and associated biofouling on the membranes.
KAUST Department:
Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division
Citation:
Effect of microbial community structure on organic removal and biofouling in membrane adsorption bioreactor used in seawater pretreatment 2016 Chemical Engineering Journal
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Chemical Engineering Journal
Issue Date:
3-Mar-2016
DOI:
10.1016/j.cej.2016.02.108
Type:
Article
ISSN:
13858947
Sponsors:
This study was supported by the National Centre of Excellence in Desalination Australia (NCEDA), which was funded by the Australian Government through the Water for the Future initiative (Project code: 08314).
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1385894716302170
Appears in Collections:
Articles; Water Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC); Biological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Division

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJeong, Sanghyunen
dc.contributor.authorCho, Kyungjinen
dc.contributor.authorBae, Hyokwanen
dc.contributor.authorKeshvardoust, Pejhmanen
dc.contributor.authorRice, Scott A.en
dc.contributor.authorVigneswaran, Saravanamuthuen
dc.contributor.authorLee, Seockheonen
dc.contributor.authorLeiknes, TorOveen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-06T13:12:48Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-06T13:12:48Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03-03en
dc.identifier.citationEffect of microbial community structure on organic removal and biofouling in membrane adsorption bioreactor used in seawater pretreatment 2016 Chemical Engineering Journalen
dc.identifier.issn13858947en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cej.2016.02.108en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/600680en
dc.description.abstractMembrane bioreactors (MBRs) were operated on-site for 56 d with different powdered activated carbon (PAC) dosages of 0, 1.5 and 5.0 g/L to pretreat seawater for reverse osmosis desalination. It was hypothesized that PAC would stimulate adsorption and biological degradation of organic compounds. The microbial communities responsible for biofouling on microfiltration (MF) membranes and biological organic removal in MBR were assessed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprinting and 454-pyrosequencing. The PAC addition improved assimilable organic carbon removal (53-59%), and resulted in reduced biofouling development on MF (> 50%) with only a marginal development in trans-membrane pressure. Interestingly, the bacterial community composition was significantly differentiated by the PAC addition. Cyanobacterium, Pelagibaca and Maricoccus were dominant in the PAC-free conditions, while Thiothrix and Sphingomonas were presumably responsible for the better reactor performances in PAC-added conditions. In contrast, the archaeal communities were consistent with predominance of Candidatus Nitrosopumilus. These data therefore show that the addition of PAC can improve MBR performance by developing different bacterial species, controlling AOC and associated biofouling on the membranes.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported by the National Centre of Excellence in Desalination Australia (NCEDA), which was funded by the Australian Government through the Water for the Future initiative (Project code: 08314).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1385894716302170en
dc.rightsNOTICE: this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Chemical Engineering Journal. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Chemical Engineering Journal, 3 March 2016. DOI: 10.1016/j.cej.2016.02.108en
dc.subjectBiofoulingen
dc.subjectMembrane bioreactoren
dc.subjectMicrobial community compositionen
dc.subjectPowder activated carbonen
dc.subjectSeawateren
dc.subjectSequencingen
dc.titleEffect of microbial community structure on organic removal and biofouling in membrane adsorption bioreactor used in seawater pretreatmenten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWater Desalination and Reuse Research Center (WDRC)en
dc.contributor.departmentBiological and Environmental Sciences and Engineering (BESE) Divisionen
dc.identifier.journalChemical Engineering Journalen
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.contributor.institutionFaculty of Engineering and IT, University of Technology, Sydney (UTS), PO Box 123, Broadway, NSW 2007 Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionThe Centre for Marine Bio-Innovation, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionThe School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionThe School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 Australiaen
dc.contributor.institutionCenter for Water Resource Cycle, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791, Republic of Koreaen
dc.contributor.institutionThe Singapore Centre on Environmental Life Sciences Engineering and the School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singaporeen
dc.contributor.affiliationKing Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST)en
kaust.authorJeong, Sanghyunen
kaust.authorLeiknes, TorOveen
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