Taking Advantage of the Strengths of 2 Different Dietary Assessment Instruments to Improve Intake Estimates for Nutritional Epidemiology

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/599862
Title:
Taking Advantage of the Strengths of 2 Different Dietary Assessment Instruments to Improve Intake Estimates for Nutritional Epidemiology
Authors:
Carroll, R. J.; Midthune, D.; Subar, A. F.; Shumakovich, M.; Freedman, L. S.; Thompson, F. E.; Kipnis, V.
Abstract:
With the advent of Internet-based 24-hour recall (24HR) instruments, it is now possible to envision their use in cohort studies investigating the relation between nutrition and disease. Understanding that all dietary assessment instruments are subject to measurement errors and correcting for them under the assumption that the 24HR is unbiased for usual intake, here the authors simultaneously address precision, power, and sample size under the following 3 conditions: 1) 1-12 24HRs; 2) a single calibrated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ); and 3) a combination of 24HR and FFQ data. Using data from the Eating at America's Table Study (1997-1998), the authors found that 4-6 administrations of the 24HR is optimal for most nutrients and food groups and that combined use of multiple 24HR and FFQ data sometimes provides data superior to use of either method alone, especially for foods that are not regularly consumed. For all food groups but the most rarely consumed, use of 2-4 recalls alone, with or without additional FFQ data, was superior to use of FFQ data alone. Thus, if self-administered automated 24HRs are to be used in cohort studies, 4-6 administrations of the 24HR should be considered along with administration of an FFQ.
Citation:
Carroll RJ, Midthune D, Subar AF, Shumakovich M, Freedman LS, et al. (2012) Taking Advantage of the Strengths of 2 Different Dietary Assessment Instruments to Improve Intake Estimates for Nutritional Epidemiology. American Journal of Epidemiology 175: 340–347. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwr317.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press (OUP)
Journal:
American Journal of Epidemiology
KAUST Grant Number:
KUS-CI-016-04
Issue Date:
24-Jan-2012
DOI:
10.1093/aje/kwr317
PubMed ID:
22273536
PubMed Central ID:
PMC3271815
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0002-9262; 1476-6256
Sponsors:
Dr. Raymond J. Carroll’s research was supported by a grant (R37-CA057030) from the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Carroll was also supported by Award KUS-CI-016-04 from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology. Dr. Laurence S. Freedman was supported by the National Institutes of Health (under contract HHSN261200633000).
Appears in Collections:
Publications Acknowledging KAUST Support

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCarroll, R. J.en
dc.contributor.authorMidthune, D.en
dc.contributor.authorSubar, A. F.en
dc.contributor.authorShumakovich, M.en
dc.contributor.authorFreedman, L. S.en
dc.contributor.authorThompson, F. E.en
dc.contributor.authorKipnis, V.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-28T06:31:08Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-28T06:31:08Zen
dc.date.issued2012-01-24en
dc.identifier.citationCarroll RJ, Midthune D, Subar AF, Shumakovich M, Freedman LS, et al. (2012) Taking Advantage of the Strengths of 2 Different Dietary Assessment Instruments to Improve Intake Estimates for Nutritional Epidemiology. American Journal of Epidemiology 175: 340–347. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwr317.en
dc.identifier.issn0002-9262en
dc.identifier.issn1476-6256en
dc.identifier.pmid22273536en
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/aje/kwr317en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/599862en
dc.description.abstractWith the advent of Internet-based 24-hour recall (24HR) instruments, it is now possible to envision their use in cohort studies investigating the relation between nutrition and disease. Understanding that all dietary assessment instruments are subject to measurement errors and correcting for them under the assumption that the 24HR is unbiased for usual intake, here the authors simultaneously address precision, power, and sample size under the following 3 conditions: 1) 1-12 24HRs; 2) a single calibrated food frequency questionnaire (FFQ); and 3) a combination of 24HR and FFQ data. Using data from the Eating at America's Table Study (1997-1998), the authors found that 4-6 administrations of the 24HR is optimal for most nutrients and food groups and that combined use of multiple 24HR and FFQ data sometimes provides data superior to use of either method alone, especially for foods that are not regularly consumed. For all food groups but the most rarely consumed, use of 2-4 recalls alone, with or without additional FFQ data, was superior to use of FFQ data alone. Thus, if self-administered automated 24HRs are to be used in cohort studies, 4-6 administrations of the 24HR should be considered along with administration of an FFQ.en
dc.description.sponsorshipDr. Raymond J. Carroll’s research was supported by a grant (R37-CA057030) from the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Carroll was also supported by Award KUS-CI-016-04 from the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology. Dr. Laurence S. Freedman was supported by the National Institutes of Health (under contract HHSN261200633000).en
dc.publisherOxford University Press (OUP)en
dc.subjectcombining dietary instrumentsen
dc.subjectdata collectionen
dc.subjectdietary assessmenten
dc.subjectenergy adjustmenten
dc.subjectepidemiologic methodsen
dc.subjectmeasurement erroren
dc.subjectnutrient densityen
dc.subjectnutrient intakeen
dc.subject.meshQuestionnairesen
dc.subject.meshEpidemiologic Research Designen
dc.titleTaking Advantage of the Strengths of 2 Different Dietary Assessment Instruments to Improve Intake Estimates for Nutritional Epidemiologyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAmerican Journal of Epidemiologyen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3271815en
dc.contributor.institutionDepartment of Statistics, College of Science, Texas A&M University, College Station, 77843-3143, USA. carroll@stat.tamu.eduen
kaust.grant.numberKUS-CI-016-04en

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