Studying the Kinetics of Crystalline Silicon Nanoparticle Lithiation with In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/599790
Title:
Studying the Kinetics of Crystalline Silicon Nanoparticle Lithiation with In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy
Authors:
McDowell, Matthew T.; Ryu, Ill; Lee, Seok Woo; Wang, Chongmin; Nix, William D.; Cui, Yi
Abstract:
In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used to study the electrochemical lithiation of high-capacity crystalline Si nanoparticles for use in Li-ion battery anodes. The lithiation reaction slows down as it progresses into the particle interior, and analysis suggests that this behavior is due not to diffusion limitation but instead to the influence of mechanical stress on the driving force for reaction. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
Citation:
McDowell MT, Ryu I, Lee SW, Wang C, Nix WD, et al. (2012) Studying the Kinetics of Crystalline Silicon Nanoparticle Lithiation with In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy. Advanced Materials 24: 6034–6041. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adma.201202744.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
Advanced Materials
KAUST Grant Number:
KUK-F1-038-02
Issue Date:
4-Sep-2012
DOI:
10.1002/adma.201202744
PubMed ID:
22945804
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0935-9648
Sponsors:
M.T.M. acknowledges support from the Chevron Stanford Graduate Fellowship, the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship, and the National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship. Portions of this work are supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515 through the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory LDRD project and the Assistant Secretary for Energy efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, Subcontract No. 6951379 under the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) Program. S. W. L. acknowledges support from KAUST (No. KUK-F1-038-02). C. M. W. acknowledges support from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The in situ TEM work was conducted in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at PNNL. PNNL is operated by Battelle for the DOE under Contract DE-AC05-76RLO1830. W.D.N. and I. R. gratefully acknowledge support of the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the US Department of Energy under contract no. DE-FG02-04ER46163. The authors would like to thank Dr. Mauro Pasta for helpful comments.
Appears in Collections:
Publications Acknowledging KAUST Support

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcDowell, Matthew T.en
dc.contributor.authorRyu, Illen
dc.contributor.authorLee, Seok Wooen
dc.contributor.authorWang, Chongminen
dc.contributor.authorNix, William D.en
dc.contributor.authorCui, Yien
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-28T06:09:53Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-28T06:09:53Zen
dc.date.issued2012-09-04en
dc.identifier.citationMcDowell MT, Ryu I, Lee SW, Wang C, Nix WD, et al. (2012) Studying the Kinetics of Crystalline Silicon Nanoparticle Lithiation with In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy. Advanced Materials 24: 6034–6041. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/adma.201202744.en
dc.identifier.issn0935-9648en
dc.identifier.pmid22945804en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/adma.201202744en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/599790en
dc.description.abstractIn situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used to study the electrochemical lithiation of high-capacity crystalline Si nanoparticles for use in Li-ion battery anodes. The lithiation reaction slows down as it progresses into the particle interior, and analysis suggests that this behavior is due not to diffusion limitation but instead to the influence of mechanical stress on the driving force for reaction. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.en
dc.description.sponsorshipM.T.M. acknowledges support from the Chevron Stanford Graduate Fellowship, the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship, and the National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship. Portions of this work are supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Contract No. DE-AC02-76SF00515 through the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory LDRD project and the Assistant Secretary for Energy efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, Subcontract No. 6951379 under the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BATT) Program. S. W. L. acknowledges support from KAUST (No. KUK-F1-038-02). C. M. W. acknowledges support from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The in situ TEM work was conducted in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at PNNL. PNNL is operated by Battelle for the DOE under Contract DE-AC05-76RLO1830. W.D.N. and I. R. gratefully acknowledge support of the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the US Department of Energy under contract no. DE-FG02-04ER46163. The authors would like to thank Dr. Mauro Pasta for helpful comments.en
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.subjectenergy storageen
dc.subjectin situ TEMen
dc.subjectLi-ion batteriesen
dc.subjectphase transformationsen
dc.subjectsiliconen
dc.titleStudying the Kinetics of Crystalline Silicon Nanoparticle Lithiation with In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAdvanced Materialsen
dc.contributor.institutionStanford University, Palo Alto, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionStanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, United Statesen
dc.contributor.institutionPacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, United Statesen
kaust.grant.numberKUK-F1-038-02en

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