Structure, Ion Transport, and Rheology of Nanoparticle Salts

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/599773
Title:
Structure, Ion Transport, and Rheology of Nanoparticle Salts
Authors:
Wen, Yu Ho; Lu, Yingying; Dobosz, Kerianne M.; Archer, Lynden A.
Abstract:
Above a critical surface chemistry-dependent particle loading associated with nanoscale interparticle spacing, ligand-ligand interactions-both electrostatic and steric-come into play and govern the structure and dynamics of charged oligomer-functionalized nanoparticle suspensions. We report in particular on the structure, ion transport, and rheology of suspensions of nanoparticle salts created by cofunctionalization of silica particles with tethered sulfonate salts and oligomers. Dispersion of the hairy ionic particles into medium and high dielectric constant liquids yields electrolytes with unique structure and transport properties. We find that electrostatic repulsion imparted by ion dissociation can be tuned to control the dispersion state and rheology through counterion size (i.e., Li+, Na+, and K+) and dielectric properties of the dispersing medium. Analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) structure factors and the mechanical modulus shows that when the interparticle spacing approaches nanometer dimensions, weakly entangled anchored ligands experience strong and long-lived topological constraints analogous to those normally found in well-entangled polymeric fluids. This finding provides insight into the molecular origins of the surprisingly similar rubbery plateau moduli observed in hairy nanoparticle suspensions and entangled polymers of the same chemistry as the tethered ligands. Additionally, we find that a time-composition superposition (TCS) principle exists for the suspensions, which can be used to substantially extend the observation time over which dynamics are observed in jammed, soft glassy suspensions. Application of TCS reveals dynamical similarities between the suspensions and entangled solutions of linear polymer chains; i.e., a hairy particle trapped in a cage appears to exhibit analogous dynamics to a long polymer chain confined to a tube. © 2014 American Chemical Society.
Citation:
Wen YH, Lu Y, Dobosz KM, Archer LA (2014) Structure, Ion Transport, and Rheology of Nanoparticle Salts. Macromolecules 47: 4479–4492. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ma5004002.
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Journal:
Macromolecules
KAUST Grant Number:
KUS-C1-018-02
Issue Date:
8-Jul-2014
DOI:
10.1021/ma5004002
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0024-9297; 1520-5835
Sponsors:
This work was supported by the National Science Foundation, Award DMR-1006323, and is based on work supported as part of the Energy Materials Center at Cornell, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Award DESC0001086. The work made use of the electrochemical characterization facilities of the KAUST-CU Center for Energy and Sustainability, which is supported by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) through Award KUS-C1-018-02. Electron microscopy facilities at the Cornell Center for Materials Research (CCMR), an NSF supported MRSEC through Grant DMR-1120296, were also used for the study.
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Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWen, Yu Hoen
dc.contributor.authorLu, Yingyingen
dc.contributor.authorDobosz, Kerianne M.en
dc.contributor.authorArcher, Lynden A.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-28T06:09:28Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-28T06:09:28Zen
dc.date.issued2014-07-08en
dc.identifier.citationWen YH, Lu Y, Dobosz KM, Archer LA (2014) Structure, Ion Transport, and Rheology of Nanoparticle Salts. Macromolecules 47: 4479–4492. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ma5004002.en
dc.identifier.issn0024-9297en
dc.identifier.issn1520-5835en
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/ma5004002en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/599773en
dc.description.abstractAbove a critical surface chemistry-dependent particle loading associated with nanoscale interparticle spacing, ligand-ligand interactions-both electrostatic and steric-come into play and govern the structure and dynamics of charged oligomer-functionalized nanoparticle suspensions. We report in particular on the structure, ion transport, and rheology of suspensions of nanoparticle salts created by cofunctionalization of silica particles with tethered sulfonate salts and oligomers. Dispersion of the hairy ionic particles into medium and high dielectric constant liquids yields electrolytes with unique structure and transport properties. We find that electrostatic repulsion imparted by ion dissociation can be tuned to control the dispersion state and rheology through counterion size (i.e., Li+, Na+, and K+) and dielectric properties of the dispersing medium. Analysis of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) structure factors and the mechanical modulus shows that when the interparticle spacing approaches nanometer dimensions, weakly entangled anchored ligands experience strong and long-lived topological constraints analogous to those normally found in well-entangled polymeric fluids. This finding provides insight into the molecular origins of the surprisingly similar rubbery plateau moduli observed in hairy nanoparticle suspensions and entangled polymers of the same chemistry as the tethered ligands. Additionally, we find that a time-composition superposition (TCS) principle exists for the suspensions, which can be used to substantially extend the observation time over which dynamics are observed in jammed, soft glassy suspensions. Application of TCS reveals dynamical similarities between the suspensions and entangled solutions of linear polymer chains; i.e., a hairy particle trapped in a cage appears to exhibit analogous dynamics to a long polymer chain confined to a tube. © 2014 American Chemical Society.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the National Science Foundation, Award DMR-1006323, and is based on work supported as part of the Energy Materials Center at Cornell, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Award DESC0001086. The work made use of the electrochemical characterization facilities of the KAUST-CU Center for Energy and Sustainability, which is supported by the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) through Award KUS-C1-018-02. Electron microscopy facilities at the Cornell Center for Materials Research (CCMR), an NSF supported MRSEC through Grant DMR-1120296, were also used for the study.en
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society (ACS)en
dc.titleStructure, Ion Transport, and Rheology of Nanoparticle Saltsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMacromoleculesen
dc.contributor.institutionCornell University, Ithaca, United Statesen
kaust.grant.numberKUS-C1-018-02en
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