Quantum Dot Photovoltaics in the Extreme Quantum Confinement Regime: The Surface-Chemical Origins of Exceptional Air- and Light-Stability

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/599428
Title:
Quantum Dot Photovoltaics in the Extreme Quantum Confinement Regime: The Surface-Chemical Origins of Exceptional Air- and Light-Stability
Authors:
Tang, Jiang; Brzozowski, Lukasz; Barkhouse, D. Aaron R.; Wang, Xihua; Debnath, Ratan; Wolowiec, Remigiusz; Palmiano, Elenita; Levina, Larissa; Pattantyus-Abraham, Andras G.; Jamakosmanovic, Damir; Sargent, Edward H.
Abstract:
We report colloidal quantum dot (CQDs) photovoltaics having a ∼930 nm bandgap. The devices exhibit AM1.5G power conversion efficiencies in excess of 2%. Remarkably, the devices are stable in air under many tens of hours of solar illumination without the need for encapsulation. We explore herein the origins of this ordersof-magnitude improvement in air stability compared to larger PbS dots. We find that small and large dots form dramatically different oxidation products, with small dots forming lead sulfite primarily and large dots, lead sulfate. The lead sulfite produced on small dots results in shallow electron traps that are compatible with excellent device performance; whereas the sulfates formed on large dots lead to deep traps, midgap recombination, and consequent catastrophic loss of performance. We propose and offer evidence in support of an explanation based on the high rate of oxidation of sulfur-rich surfaces preponderant in highly faceted large-diameter PbS colloidal quantum dots. © 2010 American Chemical Society.
Citation:
Tang J, Brzozowski L, Barkhouse DAR, Wang X, Debnath R, et al. (2010) Quantum Dot Photovoltaics in the Extreme Quantum Confinement Regime: The Surface-Chemical Origins of Exceptional Air- and Light-Stability. ACS Nano 4: 869–878. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nn901564q.
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Journal:
ACS Nano
KAUST Grant Number:
KUS-11-009-21
Issue Date:
23-Feb-2010
DOI:
10.1021/nn901564q
PubMed ID:
20104859
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1936-0851; 1936-086X
Sponsors:
We thank Vlad Sukhovatkin, Kyle Kemp, Ghada Koleilat, Illan Kramer, and Steven Huang for their assistance and insights. J. Tang thanks Dr. Dan Grozea, Dr. Srebri Petrov and Dr. Haizheng Zhong for material characterization and fruitful discussion. R. Debnath acknowledges the financial support of an e8 scholarship. This publication was supported in part by Award No. KUS-11-009-21 made by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).
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Publications Acknowledging KAUST Support

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTang, Jiangen
dc.contributor.authorBrzozowski, Lukaszen
dc.contributor.authorBarkhouse, D. Aaron R.en
dc.contributor.authorWang, Xihuaen
dc.contributor.authorDebnath, Ratanen
dc.contributor.authorWolowiec, Remigiuszen
dc.contributor.authorPalmiano, Elenitaen
dc.contributor.authorLevina, Larissaen
dc.contributor.authorPattantyus-Abraham, Andras G.en
dc.contributor.authorJamakosmanovic, Damiren
dc.contributor.authorSargent, Edward H.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-28T05:50:56Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-28T05:50:56Zen
dc.date.issued2010-02-23en
dc.identifier.citationTang J, Brzozowski L, Barkhouse DAR, Wang X, Debnath R, et al. (2010) Quantum Dot Photovoltaics in the Extreme Quantum Confinement Regime: The Surface-Chemical Origins of Exceptional Air- and Light-Stability. ACS Nano 4: 869–878. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nn901564q.en
dc.identifier.issn1936-0851en
dc.identifier.issn1936-086Xen
dc.identifier.pmid20104859en
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/nn901564qen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/599428en
dc.description.abstractWe report colloidal quantum dot (CQDs) photovoltaics having a ∼930 nm bandgap. The devices exhibit AM1.5G power conversion efficiencies in excess of 2%. Remarkably, the devices are stable in air under many tens of hours of solar illumination without the need for encapsulation. We explore herein the origins of this ordersof-magnitude improvement in air stability compared to larger PbS dots. We find that small and large dots form dramatically different oxidation products, with small dots forming lead sulfite primarily and large dots, lead sulfate. The lead sulfite produced on small dots results in shallow electron traps that are compatible with excellent device performance; whereas the sulfates formed on large dots lead to deep traps, midgap recombination, and consequent catastrophic loss of performance. We propose and offer evidence in support of an explanation based on the high rate of oxidation of sulfur-rich surfaces preponderant in highly faceted large-diameter PbS colloidal quantum dots. © 2010 American Chemical Society.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank Vlad Sukhovatkin, Kyle Kemp, Ghada Koleilat, Illan Kramer, and Steven Huang for their assistance and insights. J. Tang thanks Dr. Dan Grozea, Dr. Srebri Petrov and Dr. Haizheng Zhong for material characterization and fruitful discussion. R. Debnath acknowledges the financial support of an e8 scholarship. This publication was supported in part by Award No. KUS-11-009-21 made by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).en
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society (ACS)en
dc.subjectColloidal quantum dot photovoltaicsen
dc.subjectOptoelectronic device stabilityen
dc.subjectOxidation productsen
dc.subjectRecombinationen
dc.subjectSurface spectroscopyen
dc.subjectTransport in colloidal quantum dot solidsen
dc.subjectTrapsen
dc.titleQuantum Dot Photovoltaics in the Extreme Quantum Confinement Regime: The Surface-Chemical Origins of Exceptional Air- and Light-Stabilityen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalACS Nanoen
dc.contributor.institutionUniversity of Toronto, Toronto, Canadaen
kaust.grant.numberKUS-11-009-21en

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