Prelithiated Silicon Nanowires as an Anode for Lithium Ion Batteries

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/599388
Title:
Prelithiated Silicon Nanowires as an Anode for Lithium Ion Batteries
Authors:
Liu, Nian; Hu, Liangbing; McDowell, Matthew T.; Jackson, Ariel; Cui, Yi
Abstract:
Silicon is one of the most promising anode materials for the next-generation high-energy lithium ion battery (LIB), while sulfur and some other lithium-free materials have recently shown high promise as cathode materials. To make a full battery out of them, either the cathode or the anode needs to be prelithiated. Here, we present a method for prelithiating a silicon nanowire (SiNW) anode by a facile self-discharge mechanism. Through a time dependence study, we found that 20 min of prelithiation loads ∼50% of the full capacity into the SiNWs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies show that the nanostructure of SiNWs is maintained after prelithiation. We constructed a full battery using our prelithiated SiNW anode with a sulfur cathode. Our work provides a protocol for pairing lithium-free electrodes to make the next-generation high-energy LIB. © 2011 American Chemical Society.
Citation:
Liu N, Hu L, McDowell MT, Jackson A, Cui Y (2011) Prelithiated Silicon Nanowires as an Anode for Lithium Ion Batteries. ACS Nano 5: 6487–6493. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nn2017167.
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Journal:
ACS Nano
KAUST Grant Number:
KUS-I1-001-12
Issue Date:
23-Aug-2011
DOI:
10.1021/nn2017167
PubMed ID:
21711012
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1936-0851; 1936-086X
Sponsors:
This work was partially supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, Subcontract No. 6951379, under the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BAIT) Program. Y.C. acknowledges support from the ONR Young Investigator Award and the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Investigator Award (No. KUS-I1-001-12). M.T.M. acknowledges support from the Chevron Stanford Graduate Fellowship, the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship, and the National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship. A.J. acknowledges support from the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship,
Appears in Collections:
Publications Acknowledging KAUST Support

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Nianen
dc.contributor.authorHu, Liangbingen
dc.contributor.authorMcDowell, Matthew T.en
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Arielen
dc.contributor.authorCui, Yien
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-28T05:50:10Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-28T05:50:10Zen
dc.date.issued2011-08-23en
dc.identifier.citationLiu N, Hu L, McDowell MT, Jackson A, Cui Y (2011) Prelithiated Silicon Nanowires as an Anode for Lithium Ion Batteries. ACS Nano 5: 6487–6493. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nn2017167.en
dc.identifier.issn1936-0851en
dc.identifier.issn1936-086Xen
dc.identifier.pmid21711012en
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/nn2017167en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/599388en
dc.description.abstractSilicon is one of the most promising anode materials for the next-generation high-energy lithium ion battery (LIB), while sulfur and some other lithium-free materials have recently shown high promise as cathode materials. To make a full battery out of them, either the cathode or the anode needs to be prelithiated. Here, we present a method for prelithiating a silicon nanowire (SiNW) anode by a facile self-discharge mechanism. Through a time dependence study, we found that 20 min of prelithiation loads ∼50% of the full capacity into the SiNWs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies show that the nanostructure of SiNWs is maintained after prelithiation. We constructed a full battery using our prelithiated SiNW anode with a sulfur cathode. Our work provides a protocol for pairing lithium-free electrodes to make the next-generation high-energy LIB. © 2011 American Chemical Society.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was partially supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, Subcontract No. 6951379, under the Batteries for Advanced Transportation Technologies (BAIT) Program. Y.C. acknowledges support from the ONR Young Investigator Award and the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Investigator Award (No. KUS-I1-001-12). M.T.M. acknowledges support from the Chevron Stanford Graduate Fellowship, the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship, and the National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship. A.J. acknowledges support from the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship,en
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society (ACS)en
dc.subjectlithium ion batteryen
dc.subjectlithium-sulfur batteryen
dc.subjectprelithiationen
dc.subjectsilicon nanowiresen
dc.titlePrelithiated Silicon Nanowires as an Anode for Lithium Ion Batteriesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalACS Nanoen
dc.contributor.institutionStanford University, Palo Alto, United Statesen
kaust.grant.numberKUS-I1-001-12en

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