Oxygen-Reducing Biocathodes Operating with Passive Oxygen Transfer in Microbial Fuel Cells

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/599127
Title:
Oxygen-Reducing Biocathodes Operating with Passive Oxygen Transfer in Microbial Fuel Cells
Authors:
Xia, Xue; Tokash, Justin C.; Zhang, Fang; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia; Logan, Bruce E.
Abstract:
Oxygen-reducing biocathodes previously developed for microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have required energy-intensive aeration of the catholyte. To avoid the need for aeration, the ability of biocathodes to function with passive oxygen transfer was examined here using air cathode MFCs. Two-chamber, air cathode MFCs with biocathodes produced a maximum power density of 554 ± 0 mW/m 2, which was comparable to that obtained with a Pt cathode (576 ± 16 mW/m2), and 38 times higher than that produced without a catalyst (14 ± 3 mW/m2). The maximum current density with biocathodes in this air-cathode MFC was 1.0 A/m2, compared to 0.49 A/m2 originally produced in a two-chamber MFC with an aqueous cathode (with cathode chamber aeration). Single-chamber, air-cathode MFCs with the same biocathodes initially produced higher voltages than those with Pt cathodes, but after several cycles the catalytic activity of the biocathodes was lost. This change in cathode performance resulted from direct exposure of the cathodes to solutions containing high concentrations of organic matter in the single-chamber configuration. Biocathode performance was not impaired in two-chamber designs where the cathode was kept separated from the anode solution. These results demonstrate that direct-air biocathodes can work very well, but only under conditions that minimize heterotrophic growth of microorganisms on the cathodes. © 2013 American Chemical Society.
Citation:
Xia X, Tokash JC, Zhang F, Liang P, Huang X, et al. (2013) Oxygen-Reducing Biocathodes Operating with Passive Oxygen Transfer in Microbial Fuel Cells. Environ Sci Technol 47: 2085–2091. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es3027659.
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Journal:
Environmental Science & Technology
KAUST Grant Number:
KUS-I1-003-13
Issue Date:
19-Feb-2013
DOI:
10.1021/es3027659
PubMed ID:
23360098
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0013-936X; 1520-5851
Sponsors:
We thank Dan Sun for her assistance with some of the experiments. This research was supported by funding through the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) (Award KUS-I1-003-13), and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (863 Program) (2011AA060907).
Appears in Collections:
Publications Acknowledging KAUST Support

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorXia, Xueen
dc.contributor.authorTokash, Justin C.en
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Fangen
dc.contributor.authorLiang, Pengen
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Xiaen
dc.contributor.authorLogan, Bruce E.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-25T13:53:22Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-25T13:53:22Zen
dc.date.issued2013-02-19en
dc.identifier.citationXia X, Tokash JC, Zhang F, Liang P, Huang X, et al. (2013) Oxygen-Reducing Biocathodes Operating with Passive Oxygen Transfer in Microbial Fuel Cells. Environ Sci Technol 47: 2085–2091. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es3027659.en
dc.identifier.issn0013-936Xen
dc.identifier.issn1520-5851en
dc.identifier.pmid23360098en
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/es3027659en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/599127en
dc.description.abstractOxygen-reducing biocathodes previously developed for microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have required energy-intensive aeration of the catholyte. To avoid the need for aeration, the ability of biocathodes to function with passive oxygen transfer was examined here using air cathode MFCs. Two-chamber, air cathode MFCs with biocathodes produced a maximum power density of 554 ± 0 mW/m 2, which was comparable to that obtained with a Pt cathode (576 ± 16 mW/m2), and 38 times higher than that produced without a catalyst (14 ± 3 mW/m2). The maximum current density with biocathodes in this air-cathode MFC was 1.0 A/m2, compared to 0.49 A/m2 originally produced in a two-chamber MFC with an aqueous cathode (with cathode chamber aeration). Single-chamber, air-cathode MFCs with the same biocathodes initially produced higher voltages than those with Pt cathodes, but after several cycles the catalytic activity of the biocathodes was lost. This change in cathode performance resulted from direct exposure of the cathodes to solutions containing high concentrations of organic matter in the single-chamber configuration. Biocathode performance was not impaired in two-chamber designs where the cathode was kept separated from the anode solution. These results demonstrate that direct-air biocathodes can work very well, but only under conditions that minimize heterotrophic growth of microorganisms on the cathodes. © 2013 American Chemical Society.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank Dan Sun for her assistance with some of the experiments. This research was supported by funding through the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) (Award KUS-I1-003-13), and the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (863 Program) (2011AA060907).en
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society (ACS)en
dc.titleOxygen-Reducing Biocathodes Operating with Passive Oxygen Transfer in Microbial Fuel Cellsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEnvironmental Science & Technologyen
dc.contributor.institutionTsinghua University, Beijing, Chinaen
dc.contributor.institutionPennsylvania State University, State College, United Statesen
kaust.grant.numberKUS-I1-003-13en
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