Nutrient amendment does not increase mineralisation of sequestered carbon during incubation of a nitrogen limited mangrove soil

Handle URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10754/599025
Title:
Nutrient amendment does not increase mineralisation of sequestered carbon during incubation of a nitrogen limited mangrove soil
Authors:
Keuskamp, Joost A.; Schmitt, Heike; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.; Verhoeven, Jos T.A.; Hefting, Mariet M.
Abstract:
Mangrove forests are sites of intense carbon and nutrient cycling, which result in soil carbon sequestration on a global scale. Currently, mangrove forests receive increasing quantities of exogenous nutrients due to coastal development. The present paper quantifies the effects of nutrient loading on microbial growth rates and the mineralisation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in two mangrove soils contrasting in carbon content. An increase in SOC mineralisation rates would lead to the loss of historically sequestered carbon and an enhanced CO2 release from these mangrove soils.In an incubation experiment we enriched soils from Avicennia and Rhizophora mangrove forests bordering the Red Sea with different combinations of nitrogen, phosphorus and glucose to mimic the effects of wastewater influx. We measured microbial growth rates as well as carbon mineralisation rates in the natural situation and after enrichment. The results show that microbial growth is energy limited in both soils, with nitrogen as a secondary limitation. Nitrogen amendment increased the rate at which labile organic carbon was decomposed, while it decreased SOC mineralisation rates. Such an inhibitory effect on SOC mineralisation was not found for phosphorus enrichment.Our data confirm the negative effect of nitrogen enrichment on the mineralisation of recalcitrant carbon compounds found in other systems. Based on our results it is not to be expected that nutrient enrichment by itself will cause degradation of historically sequestered soil organic carbon in nitrogen limited mangrove forests. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
Citation:
Keuskamp JA, Schmitt H, Laanbroek HJ, Verhoeven JTA, Hefting MM (2013) Nutrient amendment does not increase mineralisation of sequestered carbon during incubation of a nitrogen limited mangrove soil. Soil Biology and Biochemistry 57: 822–829. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2012.08.007.
Publisher:
Elsevier BV
Journal:
Soil Biology and Biochemistry
KAUST Grant Number:
KUK-C1-017-12
Issue Date:
Feb-2013
DOI:
10.1016/j.soilbio.2012.08.007
Type:
Article
ISSN:
0038-0717
Sponsors:
This publication was supported by Award No KUK-C1-017-12, made available by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Saudi Arabia.
Appears in Collections:
Publications Acknowledging KAUST Support

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKeuskamp, Joost A.en
dc.contributor.authorSchmitt, Heikeen
dc.contributor.authorLaanbroek, Hendrikus J.en
dc.contributor.authorVerhoeven, Jos T.A.en
dc.contributor.authorHefting, Mariet M.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-25T13:51:25Zen
dc.date.available2016-02-25T13:51:25Zen
dc.date.issued2013-02en
dc.identifier.citationKeuskamp JA, Schmitt H, Laanbroek HJ, Verhoeven JTA, Hefting MM (2013) Nutrient amendment does not increase mineralisation of sequestered carbon during incubation of a nitrogen limited mangrove soil. Soil Biology and Biochemistry 57: 822–829. Available: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2012.08.007.en
dc.identifier.issn0038-0717en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.soilbio.2012.08.007en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10754/599025en
dc.description.abstractMangrove forests are sites of intense carbon and nutrient cycling, which result in soil carbon sequestration on a global scale. Currently, mangrove forests receive increasing quantities of exogenous nutrients due to coastal development. The present paper quantifies the effects of nutrient loading on microbial growth rates and the mineralisation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in two mangrove soils contrasting in carbon content. An increase in SOC mineralisation rates would lead to the loss of historically sequestered carbon and an enhanced CO2 release from these mangrove soils.In an incubation experiment we enriched soils from Avicennia and Rhizophora mangrove forests bordering the Red Sea with different combinations of nitrogen, phosphorus and glucose to mimic the effects of wastewater influx. We measured microbial growth rates as well as carbon mineralisation rates in the natural situation and after enrichment. The results show that microbial growth is energy limited in both soils, with nitrogen as a secondary limitation. Nitrogen amendment increased the rate at which labile organic carbon was decomposed, while it decreased SOC mineralisation rates. Such an inhibitory effect on SOC mineralisation was not found for phosphorus enrichment.Our data confirm the negative effect of nitrogen enrichment on the mineralisation of recalcitrant carbon compounds found in other systems. Based on our results it is not to be expected that nutrient enrichment by itself will cause degradation of historically sequestered soil organic carbon in nitrogen limited mangrove forests. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis publication was supported by Award No KUK-C1-017-12, made available by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal, Saudi Arabia.en
dc.publisherElsevier BVen
dc.subjectAvicenniaen
dc.subjectDecompositionen
dc.subjectFertilisationen
dc.subjectMangroveen
dc.subjectMicrobial activityen
dc.subjectNitrogen miningen
dc.subjectRhizophoraen
dc.subjectSaudi Arabiaen
dc.subjectSIRen
dc.subjectSOCen
dc.titleNutrient amendment does not increase mineralisation of sequestered carbon during incubation of a nitrogen limited mangrove soilen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalSoil Biology and Biochemistryen
dc.contributor.institutionUtrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.institutionNetherlands Institute of Ecology, Wageningen, Netherlandsen
kaust.grant.numberKUK-C1-017-12en
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